Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

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Postby king_ghidorah » Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:25 pm

Don't know how I missed this thread.

Anyone else prefer The Outer Limits to TZ?
FTW
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Postby mr.negativity » Fri Aug 16, 2013 5:44 pm

'Tron' Helmer Joseph Kosinski to Direct 'Twilight Zone' Film (Exclusive)
Leonardo DiCaprio's Appian Way is producing the property, which is now being redeveloped.
Tatiana Siegel wrote:Joseph Kosinski is about to enter The Twilight Zone. The Tron helmer is in negotiations to direct the big-screen redo of the sci-fi property for Warner Bros.

Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Davisson Killoran are producing via their Appian Way banner, which is based at Warners.

A number of writers have taken a crack at the screenplay, including Anthony Peckham (Sherlock Holmes). The project is now being redeveloped for Kosinski. Plot details are being kept under wraps.

Created by Rod Serling, The Twilight Zone began as a TV series that ran for five seasons on CBS from 1959 to 1964. Subsequent TV series were revived in 1985 and 2002. The sci-fi classic, which revolves around paranormal and futuristic storylines, also spawned a 1983 film starring John Lithgow.

Scott Bloom is executive producing the new film version.

Kosinski most recently directed the Tom Cruise starrer Oblivion for Universal. He is attached to helm a Tron sequel at Disney.

Kosinski is repped by Verve, Reset and attorneys Barry Hirsch and David Matlof.
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Postby Xenorama » Fri Aug 16, 2013 6:05 pm

king_ghidorah wrote:Don't know how I missed this thread.

Anyone else prefer The Outer Limits to TZ?


I do, but I know that's because I grew up watching OL before I ever saw TZ.
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The Twilight Zone: “Nightmare At 20,000 Feet”

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Mar 17, 2017 8:51 am

A.V. Club:
The Twilight Zone: “Nightmare At 20,000 Feet”
Todd VanDerWerff wrote:“Nightmare At 20,000 Feet” (season 5, episode 3; originally aired 10/11/1963)

In which there’s very good reason to fear flying

(Available on Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon.)

I am not a particularly great flyer. Yeah, I’ll get on a plane if I have to, and once I’m in the air, I can distract myself well enough. But I’d much rather drive, all things considered, even if it’s clear across the country. Being jammed into one of those little seats is no fun, of course, especially when it’s for long periods of time. But beneath even that is the sense that this shouldn’t be happening, that we shouldn’t be in a long metal tube that’s been flung through the sky, as if by some angry child god. I understand how the science works. I understand why this giant metal husk can stay in the sky as well as a bird can (and when was the last time you worried about a bird suddenly plummeting out of the air?). But deep down in my most primitive brain, this feels like something that shouldn’t exist, a waking nightmare that can only end in fiery death.

“Nightmare At 20,000 Feet” is one of the most famous Twilight Zone episodes—perhaps the last of the gold standard ones that everybody knows, even without seeing them (give or take a “Living Doll”)—and I think it maintains its resonance to this day because of that simple fact. Is there anybody who really enjoys flying, who doesn’t find themselves a little terrified at the thought that somebody might be clinging to the outside of the plane, tearing away at the surface and dooming everyone onboard to plunge to their deaths. And it needn’t even be a supernatural occurrence. You don’t need a gremlin involved, I don’t think. It could just be a really enterprising bird or a squirrel who went for a ride and woke up terrified. There are many, many logical reasons why this wouldn’t happen. But the best horror stories don’t speak to the logical brain. They speak to something deeper and more complicated.

Like many of the best Zones, “Nightmare” is a model of narrative efficiency. Everything you need to know about, outside of the gun used to fire upon the monster at the episode’s end, is established in the first few minutes. There’s a man who had a nervous breakdown the last time he flew, and now, he’s flying back home after a quick stay in a mental hospital. His wife is by his side, and they’re both happy he’s cured. They’re seated by the exit window, and it’s a late night flight, so most everyone (including the wife) will be sleeping. He, however, looks out that window and sees a hunched figure wandering around on the wing, bent on destruction.

The economy is astounding. Richard Matheson’s script uses this basic setup throughout the entire running time, but it finds every possible iteration of it that it can. The gremlin gets up in the man’s face for a big, spooky moment, but it also starts ripping away at the wing. When that’s not enough to up the stakes, our hero’s wife insists he take a sleeping pill, which further creates the suggestion that this might be all in his head. Because this is The Twilight Zone, we know that this is very likely actually happening, rather than being imagined, but Matheson makes very good use of the thought that everybody else thinks our hero is crazy. To stop the gremlin, he’s going to have to give away the appearance of his sanity, and yet, he must, because if he doesn’t, he and the woman he loves will die. It’s a neat twist on the standard “nobody believes the hero that there’s a monster, but there totally is” storyline that’s come up more than a few times on this show and others like it.

It goes without saying that none of this would work without William Shatner. Shatner’s a ham of an actor, and his work here as Bob Wilson is far from subtle. But that’s also always been his charm, and it’s turned all the way up in this guest spot. He had previously appeared on the show in the excellent second-season episode “Nick Of Time,” in which he faced off with a coin-operated fortune-telling machine that seemed to be the real deal, and something about the combination of his wild-eyed fervor and Matheson’s words in that episode must have spoken to somebody on the show, because the two were paired to even better effect here. The times when Shatner doesn’t work on screen are the times when he’s going so huge that he’s blowing away everybody else sharing the screen with him, but it’s hard to blow a monster crawling around on an airplane wing off the screen. When his eyes bug out and his mouth hangs open in slack-jawed awe, he’s note perfect. Furthermore, he’s helped by a really simple, really effective monster design. The gremlin seems like it’s covered in shag carpeting, sure, but it also has this horrifying, frozen face that suggests some abandoned line of primate evolution that’s been going on under our noses all this time, even if only a few of us can see it.

The episode also marks one of the earliest directorial efforts by Richard Donner, the man who would go on to direct Superman and all four Lethal Weapon films. “Nightmare” shows off a young man who’s already in near-perfect control of action direction, as he manages to turn a set that’s essentially filmed from only a handful of camera setups into something that feels filled with infinite variety. In particular, Donner makes great use of the curtain that blocks our hero’s view out the window, swiping it closed so none of us can see what’s going on, then tossing it open to reveal the monster’s face frozen against the glass or the dim glow of the electrical panel casting light up on its face. Amazingly enough, “Nightmare” must have been a very cheap episode to shoot, with only the one set and just a handful of camera setups. But Donner keeps things moving so briskly that it never feels cramped or small, outside of the fact that airplanes feel cramped and small. He even makes the gremlin floating away from the plane’s wing like a flying squirrel look eerie, rather than goofy. The ruthless efficiency of Matheson’s script makes it into Donner’s directing, and that makes so much of the difference.

Of the major Twilight Zone writers, Matheson was the one who least went in for grand, shocking twists, and “Nightmare” follows that paradigm. Rather than turning everything on its ear at the end, Matheson merely answers the story’s central question—is Bob Wilson crazy?—in the negative. (The closing narration also suggests he’ll be vindicated by the signs of the gremlin’s tampering left on the plane’s wing.) That’s, again, part of Matheson’s story economy, but it also reflects a certain affection for this man, who puts everything on the line—maybe even his marriage—to save lives. This allows for the story to become something beyond just a horror or science fiction tale, something much richer.

See, “Nightmare At 20,000 Feet,” strange as it might sound, is one of the most romantic episodes of The Twilight Zone. It reminds me of the X-Files episode “Folie A Deux” in the fact that at its center is the story of a desperately mentally ill man who only wants to find someone else to share his madness, to prove that he’s not crazy. But where “Folie” eventually showed a Mulder and Scully who could share each other’s delusions to track down things that go bump in the night, “Nightmare” has a certain tragedy at its center. It’s easy to forget—because of how thoroughly Shatner chews up this script and spits it out—that Bob’s wife is sitting there all along, played by Christine White. But there she is, and she’s just as good as Shatner, only the monster she’s worried she might be seeing is the one sitting next to her in his assigned seat. She, too, wishes what she’s seeing isn’t real, and she, too, slowly realizes that she’ll have to deal with what’s happening.

Because the episode puts us in Bob’s point-of-view—and because that gremlin really is real—it’s easy to miss that the same thing is playing out in the seat right next to him. Because of where they’ve been, Julia Wilson must always suspect her husband is rounding the bend into true insanity. The irony is that he’s never been more sane. And yet there’s that chewed-up wing, that tangible proof of Bob’s mental certainty. It might be enough to give these two space to trust each other again, or it might tear them apart in the end, simply because she couldn’t let go and trust that he would not mislead her, no matter how sound her reasons for doing so. But I want to choose to believe they’ll find their way back to each other. After all, this is an episode that ends with proof of the Twilight Zone’s existence. That, in and of itself, has to stand as a kind of hope.

What a twist!: The gremlin is real, as revealed by the damage done to the wing during flight.

Stray observations:

    Nick Cravat plays the gremlin, and he’s very good, traipsing around on the wing like some sort of long-lost missing link between ape and man.

    The remake of this episode in the Twilight Zone movie is very good and just might be the best part of that film. A lot of that is the direction of a young George Miller, but just as much is thanks to John Lithgow’s performance. (The inside joke about this in a 3rd Rock episode Shatner guest-starred in was pretty amazing.)

    I wonder how you’d remake this episode today. It certainly seems made for an age of slightly less omnipresent airline security and small propeller planes that didn’t fly nearly as high as modern jets. My guess: Put the gremlin inside the plane somewhere.
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Mar 30, 2017 1:24 am

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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby lhb412 » Sat Apr 01, 2017 10:08 pm

For decades we've said sci-fi movies are actually remakes of TZ episodes, but Alexander Payne's new movie is totally a remake of an Ultra Q episode.

http://io9.gizmodo.com/we-saw-10-minute ... 1793753129
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby Dai » Sun Apr 02, 2017 8:41 am

lhb412 wrote:For decades we've said sci-fi movies are actually remakes of TZ episodes, but Alexander Payne's new movie is totally a remake of an Ultra Q episode.

http://io9.gizmodo.com/we-saw-10-minute ... 1793753129


The 1/8th Project was one of the best episodes of Ultra Q, so this is great news. Based on the clip described in the link, here's my guess as to the direction I hope they go. I think it's conspicuous that they split up the men and women. Maybe the process doesn't work on Kristen Wiig's character, forcing Matt Damon to go on with his shrunken life without her. Damon falls for another shrunken woman, bitter love triangle ensues, and the third act is Wiig going full-on kaiju in a downsized city. Please let that be it!
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby Dai » Tue Sep 12, 2017 3:54 pm

First trailer for Downsizing:

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Looks good, and

Spoiler Below:
I think my guess in my previous post is at least partially right. We don't see Kristen Wiig in any scene that can be identified as small scale, and that looks like a divorce document Matt Damon is signing. Seems like she backs out. Of course, if she divoirces him, that makes it less likely she'll go on a jealous kaiju rampage at the end, but we can hope.
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Nov 03, 2017 12:10 am

CBS Will Revive ‘Twilight Zone’ on All Access Streaming Service
Brian Steinberg and Daniel Holloway wrote:With its ability to provide programming on demand, streaming-video services are akin to a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. Little wonder, then, that CBS has chosen its “All Access” streaming video service to launch a new version of “The Twilight Zone,” the seminal sci-fi series that opened each week with a distinctive introduction from creator Rod Serling that used those aforementioned words.

“All Access will be the home of a new version of one of the most iconic television shows of all time – The Twilight Zone,” said Leslie Moonves, CEO of CBS Corp., during a conference call with investors Thursday.

According to sources, CBS is in talks with Jordan Peele to executive produce the new version of the show through his company Monkeypaw with Marc Ramirez serving as showrunner. CBS declined to comment on the show’s auspices.

Moonves did not offer many details about the program, but the company has burnished science fiction on its “All Access” service, which currently offers the latest iteration of the venerable “Star Trek” series. CBS last month said it would renew the series, “Star Trek: Discovery,” for a second season.

CBS has long eyed a reboot of “The Twilight Zone.” As recently as last year, CBS Television Studios had been developing the property with “X-Men” filmmakers Bryan Singer and Simon Kinberg and “Limitless” showrunner Craig Sweeny. At the time, CBS was weighing whether to shop the project wide or place it on digital service CBS All Access.

Kinberg left the project to go to work on the upcoming “X-Men” feature film at Fox. He, Singer, and Sweeney are no longer involved in “The Twilight Zone.”

The original “Twilight Zone” aired for five seasons on CBS from 1959 to 1964. Serling wrote or co-wrote most of the 156 episodes in the series. The episodes told original tales rooted in science fiction and horror, and featured well-known and rising actors — among them Buster Keaton, Burgess Meredith, Dennis Hopper, Elizabeth Montgomery, Leonard Nimoy, Robert Redford, and William Shatner.

The series has been revived twice before. The first reboot premiered in 1986 on CBS and ran for 110 episodes. The second, featuring Forest Whitaker in Serling’s on-air role, premiered in 2002 on UPN and lasted 43 episodes. A 1983 feature-film version, “The Twilight Zone: The Movie,” included vignettes directed by John Landis, Steven Spielberg, Joe Dante and George Miller.
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby lhb412 » Fri Nov 03, 2017 2:09 am

There was certainly something Serling-esque about Get Out, so I approve of Peele's involvement.
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Re: THE TWILIGHT ZONE

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:03 pm

Deadline, September 13, 2019:
‘The Twilight Zone’ At 60: Rod Serling’s Big Return Includes TV, Graphic Novel, Film
Geoff Boucher wrote:EXCLUSIVE The 60th anniversary of The Twilight Zone arrives next month and the late, great Rod Serling is clearly a man in demand more than four decades after his death at age 50 in 1975.

The Twilight Zone premiered on CBS in the waning months of the Eisenhower era, but more than a half-century later the brand is enjoying a resurgence, as is Serling, the creator, host, producer and social conscience behind the pioneering anthology that specialized in “imaginative tales that are not bound by time or space or the established laws of nature.”

Few shows plant a flag in the public imagination the way The Twilight Zone did. Its name, its theme music, and many of its characters (including monotone narrator Serling) became part of the American lexicon. In 2013, the WGA named it the third-best written show in television history (behind The Sopranos and Seinfeld) while TV Guide ranked it as the fifth best television series in broadcast history.

Among the show’s many fans: three-time Oscar nominee Frank Darabont, the writer-director of The Shawshank Redemption and co-creator of The Walking Dead series on AMC.

“The twist endings are fun, that’s icing for me, it’s the cherry on top of the sundae, but the aspect that stays with you are the moral complexities of what Serling would work into the textures of the thing,” Darabont told Deadline. “He was telling adult stories, and mind you, this was at the time when television was not really that adult. You look back in the 1960s we had a lot of shows that were apparently aimed at 10-year olds, you know, the Gilligan’s Island era of television. So, to have something that was really smart, really adult, and dared to have that moral compass in the storytelling was so refreshing. Even as a kid I appreciated how smart and adult that was, and what a sneaky triumph that was for him. Issues he dealt with in The Twilight Zone were issues that the suits would never let him deal with if it weren’t science fiction, these really intriguing, ironic stories about the human condition. I’m a big, big, big, big, big fan of Mr. Serling.”

Serling introduced the pioneering CBS series as a place as “vast as space and as timeless as infinity” and the brand and the man behind it seem to be living up to that promise with their 21st century reach. Consider:

Series revival: The Twilight Zone series on CBS All Access is a linchpin (along with the new Star Trek shows) of the subscription streaming service. Developed by Simon Kinberg, Jordan Peele and Marco Ramirez, and hosted by Peele, the series has been renewed for a second season. The series earned Kumail Nanjiani his first Emmy nomination for the episode titled “The Comedian.” The Season 1 finale (directed by Kinberg) was titled “Blurryman” and featured a startling guest appearance: Serling himself, resurrected in CG form, ushered a fan of the original series into a black-and-white realm that lies somewhere between the living past and the meta-present.

New biopic: Richard Kelly, the writer-director behind the brilliantly off-kilter Donnie Darko (2001), is ramping up a biopic on Serling for Mandalay Pictures that’s scheduled to go into production next year. Jason Michael Berman is producing with Kevin Turen (Arbitrage), Matthew Lindner (Nine Days) and Kelly’s manager Brian Young.

Graphic novel biography: The venerable publishing house called Humanoids delivers a surprisingly poignant, intensely researched and crisply illustrated biography of Serling in the form of The Twilight Man, a 180-page graphic novel by cartoonist Koren Shadmi. Deadline has an exclusive preview of the book’s eerie opening chapter, which introduces Serling in a fashion that suits the late storyteller’s sensibilities. (Preview below.)

Expanded ride: The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror at Disneyland Paris is getting a major upgrade with three new storylines and an expanded name: A New Dimension of Chills has been added as a sobriquet. Visitors don’t know if their plummeting elevator will be sent plummeting by the strange creatures in the elevator shaft or hurled into a strange new dimension by a vindictive poltergeist. The revamped ride opens its doors September 28.

Art exhibit: An exhibit called Art Inspired by The Twilight Zone opens on October 4 (the actual anniversary of the original series’ premiere) at the Del Ray Gallery in Alexandria, VA. It’s one of several art openings tied to the anniversary across the country.
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby Dr Kain » Fri Sep 13, 2019 11:53 pm

That sounds like it could have been cool.

I'm halfway through Season 5 and so far it's been about average, though if I compare it to the first 3 seasons of the show, that means it is subpar. So far the only episode in this season that has truly wowed me was Nightmare at 20,000 Feet.
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby H-Man » Sun Sep 15, 2019 9:26 am

There’s a definite dip in quality in the fifth season but there are still some classic episodes sprinkled throughout. Unfortunately the show suffered in its latter two seasons because producer Buck Houghton has moved on to another series. I think in the last two years (one of which was only half a season), TZ went through three producers. It was on life support.
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby Dr Kain » Sun Sep 15, 2019 11:01 am

H-Man wrote:There’s a definite dip in quality in the fifth season but there are still some classic episodes sprinkled throughout. Unfortunately the show suffered in its latter two seasons because producer Buck Houghton has moved on to another series. I think in the last two years (one of which was only half a season), TZ went through three producers. It was on life support.


I can see that. I mean, it's fine as I kind of expected by the time I hit episode 100 there was going to be a drop, it's just disappointing that it did indeed happen, but again, 100 solid episodes is fantastic. So far for S5 I have likee The Living Doll, Night Call, An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, You Drive, and Some Kind of Stop Watch, it's just that they don't compare to the likes of The Monsters are Due on Maple Street, The After Hours, The Invaders, It's a Good Life, Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?, Five Characters in Search of an Exit, and To Serve Man.
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby mr.negativity » Wed Sep 25, 2019 12:54 pm

THR, SEPTEMBER 25, 2019:
Classic 'Twilight Zone' Episodes Coming to Theaters for 60th Anniversary (Exclusive)
Pamela McClintock wrote:Fathom and CBS Home Entertainment will celebrate the 60th anniversary of Rod Serling's The Twilight Zone by bringing digitally restored versions of six quintessential episodes to theaters across the country on Nov. 14.

The one-night only event will also include a new documentary short, Remembering Rod Serling. More than 600 cinemas will participate in The Twilight Zone: A 60th Anniversary Celebration. Tickets go on sale Friday.

After combing through 156 episodes of the mind-bending series, which originally ran from 1959-1964, CBS curated shows that were noteworthy fan favorites. It's the first time any Twilight Zone episode has been presented on the big screen, according to Fathom.

“The incredible mind of Rod Serling led to some of the most indelible moments ever created for television, and selecting these episodes was both a great pleasure and a responsibility we took seriously, knowing how much the series means to generations of fans,” CBS Home Entertainment executive vp and general manager Ken Ross said Tuesday in a statement.

Added Fathom CEO Ray Nutt: “The Twilight Zone has inspired many filmmakers and storytellers, so it is a great honor to be able to bring these classic stories to the big screen, and to offer such an incisive look into the mind of the man who created them.”

The six episodes are “Walking Distance” (original airdate Oct. 30, 1959); “Time Enough at Last” (original airdate Nov. 20, 1959); “The Invaders” (original airdate Jan. 27, 1961); “The Monsters are Due on Maple Street” (original airdate: March 4, 1960); “Eye of the Beholder” (original airdate Nov. 11, 1960); and “To Serve Man” (original airdate March 2, 1962).

The new documentary offers a look at the life experiences that inspired Serling’s unique blend of thought-provoking and visionary storytelling, from his time as a paratrooper in World War II to his early writing days in live television, and ultimately to the creation of the indelible TV series.
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby Dr Kain » Wed Sep 25, 2019 7:59 pm

Again?!

They brought episodes to theaters last week when I was in Tuscon and now they are bringing episodes to theaters when I will be in Portland. :evil: :P :D
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Re: Only 4 plots, rest are TWILIGHT ZONES

Postby Dr Kain » Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:41 am

My top 10 Twilight Zone episodes list:

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