Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Psycho Soldier » Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:02 am

If the rest of the trilogy has been this good, I've have thought more highly of it. Flawed as this installment is, it does generate some excitement on the strength of its thematic convictions and emphasis on action over worldbuilding. I also appreciated the Lovecraftian take on Ghidorah (though I'm not in love with his design or "fight" with Godzilla). But it does still have its ponderous moments, its weak dialogue, its dull Godzilla, and its less-than-stellar 3D anime style. I'd give this installment a 6.5 out of 10 and the trilogy overall a grudging 6.

I do have to give THE PLANET EATER credit, though: it finally delivered the anti-civilization message I've anticipated from this franchise for a while. I'm not anti-civ, mind you, but given the Godzilla series' general skepticism of technology, the expression of such a message did seem inevitable.

My take is going off of half-memories of the previous two installments, and it's probably too late at night for me to attempt this sort of analysis, so feel free to correct me on any of these points. What's worth noting is that the Houtua, IIRC, don't fit the bill of a (traditional) civilization: they lack agriculture and live a sort of hunter-gatherer lifestyle, with the only obvious hierarchy being in their worship of Mothra. They don't seem very nomadic, but Godzilla and his corruption of the planet almost certainly restrict the Houtua's movements. They also have religion and ritual, which is sometimes more characteristic of sedentary/civilized peoples than of nomadic or hunter-gatherer types, but this will fall outside of my focus for now.

Haruo's sacrifice achieves two things: it rejects not only the technology that gives rise to monsters, but civilization itself. The Bilusaludo epitomize one of civilization's potential outcomes: they have (almost?) achieved the technological singularity and can merge with Mechagodzilla City, but they lose their humanity as a result. It's a prime example of people enslaving themselves to technology and thereby dooming themselves. On the other hand, the Exif perfected their sciences to the point where nihilism became mathematically justifiable. Perhaps Haruo sees this in their and humanity's examples: if every form of civilization leads to ecological disaster and human extinction, then civilized people must abandon their former ways and live akin to the Houtua--closer to and more respectful of nature. By destroying the Vulture and Yuko's nanomental-consumed body along with himself, Haruo tries to prevent Martin from repeating history and the catastrophic mistakes of human "progress."

In that light, it's interesting that the Houtua children, at the end, sacrifice their fears to what looks like an effigy of the Vulture--the last hope for the old civilization's reestablishment, but also the Houtua's "Wrathful Lord" who purifies them of curses.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby angilas » Sat Jan 12, 2019 10:13 am

^interesting take (also glad this thread gets multiple pages since if any of the anime trilogy is worthy of commenting this one is, but many may be burned out from prior disappointment). I never thought about how the franchise has been leaning towards anti-civilization and technology for a while now as opposed to just anti-nuclear, anti-pollution, or anti-artificial-life. It’s a good way of tying all the races approaches to life in on this.

While I gave this a 7/10 I think I give the series as a whole a 5/10. It’s just too much of a wasted opportunity to have the reluctant to ever allow an anime Toho, to produce one that’s so devoid of monsters, action or any of the excitement that the anime genre is capable of producing. While I felt this last film did the most with what it had to work with and produced an inspired and compelling take on the franchise and some deep concepts without boring the audience to sleep, without it the first 2 felt like a waste, the second in particular.

While I’m obviously no director and it may not be my place to say, if I could alter these films to make them something I’d recommend, I’d delete large chunks of the first movie up until the final battle and intersperse dramatic battles from the novelizations as flashbacks ala The Godfather 2, perhaps to make you more connected with some of the characters who were there or the world but mainly to make it more fun to watch than some poorly animated repetitive scenes of servos:
phpBB [media]


I’d do the same with much of the second film including its novelization tie in during flashback scenes for galugu and the bilasaludo with mechagodzilla and Gigan or the houta for battra, gorath or Mothra:
phpBB [media]

Also instead of repeating the same strategy used on Filius either have it fail early on or replace it entirely with this (just animated at full studio quality):
phpBB [media]


Finally this may be a bit of a nitpick but for Planet Eater, show a little bit of the backstory on the alien races from their home world instead of doing so much telling. Renji Oku isn’t doing a novel for these so instead we get 2 rewrites of the trilogy: https://wikizilla.org/wiki/Godzilla:_Pl ... velization) . That’s fine, it’s just surprising we saw more backstory on the nebula space hunter m aliens in the shoestring-budget, stock-film laden Godzilla vs Gigan, than we’ve seen for any of the aliens in this. Make those changes and I’d probably rate the trilogy as a whole an 8/10 or a 9/10.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Psycho Soldier » Sat Jan 12, 2019 1:58 pm

The Godzilla franchise tends to criticize particular technologies rather than civilization, though the seeds of an anti-civ take were planted by at least the time of GODZILLA VS. MOTHRA (with Battra destroying the ancients and their weather control device). I don't see that approach as a good or bad thing per se, just a matter of emphasis. But G2014 pretty much conceives of ecological balance as the present status quo plus Godzilla, and I've been eager to see a challenge to that perspective ever since, even if I end up disagreeing with both views. I hadn't expected the anime trilogy to make the attempt, though, which makes THE PLANET EATER more interesting to me than Parts 1 and 2.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby angilas » Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:26 pm

Psycho Soldier wrote:The Godzilla franchise tends to criticize particular technologies rather than civilization, though the seeds of an anti-civ take were planted by at least the time of GODZILLA VS. MOTHRA (with Battra destroying the ancients and their weather control device). I don't see that approach as a good or bad thing per se, just a matter of emphasis. But G2014 pretty much conceives of ecological balance as the present status quo plus Godzilla, and I've been eager to see a challenge to that perspective ever since, even if I end up disagreeing with both views. I hadn't expected the anime trilogy to make the attempt, though, which makes THE PLANET EATER more interesting to me than Parts 1 and 2.


Amazing GvsMothra didn’t even come to mind when I thought of the films anti civilization/tech take. Probably because it’s the only Heisei film I only owned the dub for and I despise every Heisei dub outside of 85 and Biollante (sorry but the voice acting sounded awful to me, probably because they only made international versions for those 5 instead of tailored US dubs, unlike much of the Showa, 80s and G2K) so I’ve seen it the least. Yeah the backstory for battra definitely is anti-civ. The whole film is pro environment and I guess it would resonate even more with the Houta than MvG. The novelization tie ins backstory of Battra being designated to destroy Gorath before she was killed should have jogged my memory at least. It took elements of GvM and Final Wars (which was originally supposed to be a Heisei sequel) that would have probably made the meteor Battra was supposed to destroy be the same Gorath. Though it struck in 2034 if I remember correctly and hers was supposed to arrive in 1999, so maybe not, unless there was a second one she was supposed to take out some time later

The first films I thought of were G54, Hedorah and GvMG 93 (the whole line of “life versus artificial life” that’s spoken in English by the female blonde MG pilot). This might be the first time we’ve had anti-technology as a message with aliens making the same mistake I can think of besides maybe Gigan, when they had destroyed their world in Nebula Space Hunter M the way they saw us doing. I suppose a case could be made for the Black Hole Aliens in ToMG needing Katsura’s human touch to succeed where MG had failed before (well she would have if not for love) but w/o tech they die in the black hole.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Dai » Sat Jan 12, 2019 5:40 pm

I found Planet Eater the most thematically interesting of the trilogy, but the most boring to watch. Haruo does nothing for the first 80 minutes while people state their philosophical views at him. I'm not saying he should have been running around mindlessly blasting everything, since that would have been boring too, but he doesn't even debate or struggle against what's happening until the final 10 minutes. He just...floats, first figuratively, and then literally. And that was the problem with the whole movie; it was a lot of inactive floating. Every character except Metphies shows a frustrating lack of drive in this final movie. Everyone else spends all their time commenting on the fallout of movie 2, commenting on what Godzilla and Ghidorah are doing (which mostly involved staying still, changing temperature, and more literal floating), or just standing around and dying. Nobody does anything.

The only part I enjoyed was the denouement, probably because it was the only time Haruo was thinking, deciding, and acting. It was a final flourish that conveyed the idea that, "A monster is only a monster when it's hated" in a compelling and moving way, and was far more effective than an hour of Metphies droning on.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby H-Man » Sun Jan 13, 2019 1:45 am

Dai wrote:I found Planet Eater the most thematically interesting of the trilogy, but the most boring to watch. Haruo does nothing for the first 80 minutes while people state their philosophical views at him. I'm not saying he should have been running around mindlessly blasting everything, since that would have been boring too, but he doesn't even debate or struggle against what's happening until the final 10 minutes. He just...floats, first figuratively, and then literally. And that was the problem with the whole movie; it was a lot of inactive floating. Every character except Metphies shows a frustrating lack of drive in this final movie. Everyone else spends all their time commenting on the fallout of movie 2, commenting on what Godzilla and Ghidorah are doing (which mostly involved staying still, changing temperature, and more literal floating), or just standing around and dying. Nobody does anything.


This is such a great point.

My biggest complaint is that there's too much exposition. I know this isn't Toho Kingdom but I want to clarify that I have no problem with "human scenes" or the advancement of plot through dialogue. That's how movies work. But I honestly felt there was too much talk in these movies and I wished the filmmakers had let the visuals speak for themselves more often than they did.

I was actually reminded of something I'd read in The Twilight Zone Companion by Marc Scott Zicree, and I pulled out my well worn copy so I wouldn't have to paraphrase it. Here, Zicree is quoting Theodore Sturgeon in reference to the episode "The Invaders:"

Years ago, a producer—happened to be a very schlock producer, but he knew what he was talking about—said that if a blind man sits in front of a television set listening to a drama and he can tell you afterwards what it was about, then the director, the producer, the writer and everybody else have failed. Likewise, if a deaf man watches a television show and can tell you what the whole thing was about, then it has succeeded. This is a way of underlining the fact that it's a visual medium.


And I know I'm sorta comparing apples to oranges. "The Invaders" is not the high-concept sci-fi story that Urobuchi wrote in this trilogy. I also know that all the exposition didn't simply narrate what could have been non-dialogue sequences. I only felt that as a viewer I was being told much more than I was being shown and that disappointed me. Maybe it's not bad filmmaking but it's not what I like or even what I'm used to with kaiju movies. (I believe Ishiro Honda had said something similar after viewing Biollante but I can't find that quote.) I wasn't familiar with Urobuchi's work before these movies but a quick Google search just now tells me he's best known as a novelist. I believe it!
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Gwangi » Sun Jan 13, 2019 12:14 pm

As I have been saying, this has not been the most engaging series, however, I was very much satisfied with "Planet Eater". A bummer (but ultimately necessary) ending for sure, and of course, the end credits segment leaves us with questions. Is Toho going to continue down the line in a couple of years, with Mothra as the protagonist?

I had no problem with this interpretation of Ghidrah (just as I had no problems with this version of Godzilla). Could we have seen better monster battle action throughout this series? You bet! But for this last battle between G and spaghetti Ghidrah, not only did I think it was refreshingly different, but rather fascinating as well.

I am not going to repeat what others have said about this movie and the series in general, because many of you have said it much better than I could ever write. I am just curious in 10 years from now, how many of us will see this? Will we have the same feeling - love it or hate it? Will some have mellowed out with time and perhaps think that it was not so bad after all? Or vice-versa, perhaps it was overvalued during this period? God willing, I hope I am around in 10 years to see these results.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby klen7 » Sun Jan 13, 2019 7:39 pm

^ i know i have warmed up to Final Wars over the years, so maybe the same thing will happen here... but in the case of FW it had to do with appreciating the technical execution of the suits, etc. With the anime series, the technical failures are what frustrate me the most. The animation looks cheap and stiff and does little to take advantage of the medium until Ghidorah shows up. Despite Ghidorah succeeding, there are times when 90s Flash animation is smoother, you could tell this same story with dolls.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby tbeasley » Sun Jan 13, 2019 8:01 pm

Some of the movie's themes (however you want to put them) reminded me of this -
Honda saw the first Godzilla film as a humanist statement against nuclear weapons. The message that Honda sought to transmit in Godzilla (1954) can likely be summed up by Dr. Yamane’s line at the end of the film that man should stop tinkering with nuclear weapons lest another Godzilla appear one day. Ifukube saw things a little differently. For him, Godzilla was an appealing character because he represented the superiority or supremacy of the forces of nature over man’s technological advancements. Godzilla is a god worshipped by the Odo Islanders; these are not by any means metropolitan people; this is a population far removed from the hustle and bustle and city lights of Tokyo; they cling to the old ways and Godzilla is their pagan god, their avatar. When man’s technology, i.e. the hydrogen bomb, irritates Godzilla and wakes him from his aquatic slumber, he sets off to Tokyo and obliterates it. All of man’s modern weaponry such as tanks, planes and missiles do nothing to stop him. Godzilla destroys all of modern Tokyo including the Diet Building, the literal representation of the modern, post-war Japanese government and society. At no point do we see Godzilla destroy any of Tokyo’s “old world” sites such as the Asakusa Temple or the Imperial Palace. Godzilla spares those.

Again, in Ifukube’s mind, Godzilla represented a sort of anti-technological catharsis. Pagan nature’s power over technology, as I have said. Indeed, a very different outlook from Honda’s.

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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Benjamin Haines » Sun Jan 13, 2019 11:30 pm

lhb412 wrote:King Ghidorah was really interesting, in both the way he looked and the reactions to him, like how he affected all of the equipment temporally, causing the people on the bridge of the ship to monitor their death before it happened, which is a very nice macabre touch.


That moment was great. It seemed like something that would happen on Doctor Who.

Man, seeing those people manipulated into chanting "Come forth, Ghidorah! The Wings of Death!" right before being dismembered... It's so chilling.


Gwangi wrote:I am just curious in 10 years from now, how many of us will see this? Will we have the same feeling - love it or hate it? Will some have mellowed out with time and perhaps think that it was not so bad after all? Or vice-versa, perhaps it was overvalued during this period? God willing, I hope I am around in 10 years to see these results.


I think that this anime trilogy is going to age really well. I don't think Toho will attempt another anime take on Godzilla anytime soon given the soft reception these films seem to have gotten in Japan so I think they'll remain unique as the only anime Godzilla movies for a long time. This trilogy seems to be geared toward viewers of anime who hadn't necessarily ever seen a Godzilla film before. It's not surprising that the G fandom's overall reception has been lukewarm at best and relatively indifferent considering how this trilogy doesn't aim to deliver the standard hallmarks for which Toho's live-action films are known.

While I'm thrilled to have so many different and radically diverse Godzilla projects happening concurrently, it's not something that every market really needs. The western fandom is jazzed about the Monsterverse while Japanese audiences were enthralled with Shin Godzilla. The anime trilogy isn't something that audiences are clamoring for anywhere. It's just a big bonus for viewers who happen to be interested in what it has to offer but I think it'll find its audience over time.


Psycho Soldier wrote:I do have to give THE PLANET EATER credit, though: it finally delivered the anti-civilization message I've anticipated from this franchise for a while. I'm not anti-civ, mind you, but given the Godzilla series' general skepticism of technology, the expression of such a message did seem inevitable.


I remember when I took driver's education class in high school and they showed us several videos featuring families and law enforcement talking about the horrific accidents that can occur on the road. There was also one video that had this unspeaking, seemingly invulnerable idiot demonstrating different ways that cars can spin out of control and crash. They weren't anti-driving or anti-car videos. They were meant to caution against unsafe driving and encourage safe driving. In that same vein, I don't think the message of this anime Godzilla trilogy is necessarily anti-civilization. I think it's supposed to just be a pro-humanity message and a warning against allowing the advancement of our civilization to cause us to lose touch with our humanity.

From the beginning of Planet of the Monsters, Metphies convinces Haruo that his hatred for Godzilla is an indicator of his own humanity. That was always a lie. Haruo viewed Godzilla as a challenger to humanity, a usurper of planet Earth which humanity failed to stand against. However, as Lazzari surmises in The Planet Eater, Godzilla is the ultimate manifestation of humanity itself. Metphies admits the truth when he talks about how many other planets previously produced a Godzilla of their own. Humanity's existence on Earth is not unique but part of an endless, interconnected cycle of life developing on planets throughout the universe, probably through the panspermia hypothesis. That's why humans, Exif and Bilusaludo all have the same basic hominid characteristics despite originating on different planets. That's also why so many past civilizations ultimately produced a Godzilla of their own, which the Exif then offered to Ghidorah along with the planets that produced them.

Haruo doesn't know any of that when they first return to Earth. His sense of humanity is rooted in pride and he believes that Earth is humanity's rightful home. When he is manipulated by Metphies into leading everyone against Godzilla in battle, Haruo is no different from any of the followers of the Exif's cult in the sense that he has lost touch with his humanity even as he believes that he's acting on behalf of humanity. In true religious fashion, the loss of so many lives coupled with the perception of miracles inspires devotion in the survivors to the point where they're beckoning humanity's doom out loud and they don't even realize it.

Had Haruo succumbed completely to his hatred for Godzilla, he ultimately would have worshiped Ghidorah's name and welcomed seeing Godzilla offered as a sacrifice, continuing the cycle that has occurred on countless worlds before. Instead, with help from Maina and Mothra, Haruo realized that the fates of Godzilla, humanity and the Earth are all connected and treating Godzilla as humanity's opponent is what's dooming their home planet.

The Houtua seem to represent hope for life to endure on this planet. No matter how uninhabitable we allow Earth to become, people will be able to persevere and continue on if they're resourceful, even if that means redefining our standards of civilization. Like you mentioned, Psycho Soldier, the Houtua seem to be a society of hunter-gatherers but they have traits more typical of civilizations such as ritual and religion. They arguably do fit the bill for a nontraditional civilization already but even if they don't they're certainly on that track. With Godzilla being the ultimate, seemingly inevitable product of humanity, a living embodiment of the consequences of unchecked scientific exploitation, the survival of the Houtua represents a second chance for human civilization. If people can live with the lessons of Godzilla towering above them at all times, human civilization actually can thrive without dooming itself or the planet.

Haruo and Godzilla's success in making Earth the planet that breaks the chain of Ghidorah's destruction reinforces that theme of hope for humanity going forward. I don't think Haruo's final sacrifice is about rejecting civilization itself but about giving the Houtua's civilization (which now includes his old friends and his children) a chance to keep growing without being plagued by mistakes which past civilizations already made. Wanting their civilization to live closer to and more respectful of nature isn't a rejection of the concept of civilization; it's simply a reappraisal of what's important for civilization to thrive.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Psycho Soldier » Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:08 am

Fair points. It might also be worth pointing out that, in a way, the Houtua are destined to (re)produce a monster of their own, Mothra. but she seems not to be a destructive force in the vein of Godzilla, Mechagodzilla or Ghidorah, and doesn't strictly require humans for her rebirth or summoning anyway, IIRC. So yes, the Houtua, while closer to nature than their predecessors, still retain elements of civilization, and that's why I don't go full John Zerzan at 2 A.M. on a message board.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby angilas » Mon Jan 14, 2019 8:10 am

^^interesting interpretation. I guess there’s a bit of Haruo ending the cycle of violence and hatred in there by him offing himself and the last bit of corrupting tech. I think hearing it was billusado tech reminded him of what he almost became and the need to eradicate it and the last vestiges of nano along with the woman he loved corrupted by the literally and himself corrupted by them mentally. Also worth noting was his closeness with Metpheis. He weeped at his death. The whole arc was emotionally grueling for Haruo so like her he probably needed to be put out of his misery. Like Coolio and unlike the Houta he can’t live a normal life, he was raised by the streets. Or in this case the hatred of humanities past war

Psycho Soldier wrote:Fair points. It might also be worth pointing out that, in a way, the Houtua are destined to (re)produce a monster of their own, Mothra. but she seems not to be a destructive force in the vein of Godzilla, Mechagodzilla or Ghidorah, and doesn't strictly require humans for her rebirth or summoning anyway, IIRC. So yes, the Houtua, while closer to nature than their predecessors, still retain elements of civilization, and that's why I don't go full John Zerzan at 2 A.M. on a message board.


Speaking of humanities past wars, in the second films book/backstory Mothra showed up in the earth of 20,000 years ago (aka the 2030s) and died defending earth if I’m not mistaken. Battra was offed by Godzilla too. Don’t know if books are canon to the films but just worth thinking about (or not)
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby O.Supreme » Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:43 pm

So...I finally watched this on Friday Night..I guess it's not just my thing. i heavily defended the first film, because IMHO, it wasn't that bad. But for me personally each installment has gotten worse, with #3 being definitely the lowest of the 3. I still think there is great potential for an animated Godzilla Series, so I hope Toho doesn't take any negativity in audience reaction as this is something not to be done ever again, they just need to do something more traditional.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby EricDent » Wed Jan 16, 2019 4:52 pm

angilas wrote:yeah, he’s definitely still alive. Haruo just wanted to take himself out, put out of her misery, and hurt Godzilla in the process. This should end humanities ambitions and the cycle of tech and gloom that the houta don’t understand. I personally think it’s his offspring with Miana (she definitely seemed pregnant before and older at the end) that hint at continuing the cycle in the post credits Mothra worship scene. Was that Mothra’s egg they touched when she appeared to destroy the Enola Gay? Or was it just a curved wall?


It was her egg, and they used it to help break the hold on Haruo's mind.

I watched the 3rd part recently.
It was interesting.

BTW did nobody else notice that the "idol" the kids were telling their fears (in the stinger) to was similar looking to the exo-suits they used against Godzilla?
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby CCMan » Sun Jan 20, 2019 6:54 pm

Well I enjoyed it after the slog of the first one. This is probably my favorite incarnation of Ghidorah.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Benjamin Haines » Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:59 pm

Psycho Soldier wrote:Fair points. It might also be worth pointing out that, in a way, the Houtua are destined to (re)produce a monster of their own, Mothra. but she seems not to be a destructive force in the vein of Godzilla, Mechagodzilla or Ghidorah, and doesn't strictly require humans for her rebirth or summoning anyway, IIRC. So yes, the Houtua, while closer to nature than their predecessors, still retain elements of civilization, and that's why I don't go full John Zerzan at 2 A.M. on a message board.


No your analysis was great, you provided a lot to think about. Absolutely the Houtua are on track to one day bring about another giant monster on planet Earth in the form of Mothra and that could go a number of different ways. The original Godzilla is still looming near the Houtua and there are probably several other, smaller Godzillas scattered around the world. It's still very much Godzilla's Earth so what will happen when Mothra eventually hatches from that egg? What would the Houtua want to happen? This Godzilla is apparently the first one to succeed in saving his parent planet from Ghidorah, meaning that Earth is entering a new age of uncharted territory that other worlds have yet to see. Godzilla reigns supreme, humanity lives on and the planet eater was repelled.

How would Mothra eventually factor into the equation? She seems to be another being capable of interdimensional travel and communication like Ghidorah, although the physical presence of her egg suggests that this is her home dimension. Metphies' reaction to seeing her was "Damn the blasphemous" and there do seem to be parallels between the Houtua's worship of Mothra and the Exif's worship of Ghidorah. Just how different is Mothra from Ghidorah, then? Would the Houtua eventually call upon her to confront Godzilla? What would become of Earth if Mothra emerged victorious? Would she take Godzilla's place as Earth's protector, one which allows the Houtua to prosper, or would Mothra eventually consume the planet in her own way?

Speaking of the Houtua...


EricDent wrote:BTW did nobody else notice that the "idol" the kids were telling their fears (in the stinger) to was similar looking to the exo-suits they used against Godzilla?


Yes! It seems that the Houtua understood why Haruo sacrificed himself and they began that annual ritual in his honor, with the burning effigy resembling the Vulture. That scene seems to be set several years later based on the dialogue and Miana's slightly aged appearance and at least one of those kids is probably the child of Maina and Haruo.


angilas wrote:^^interesting interpretation. I guess there’s a bit of Haruo ending the cycle of violence and hatred in there by him offing himself and the last bit of corrupting tech. I think hearing it was billusado tech reminded him of what he almost became and the need to eradicate it and the last vestiges of nano along with the woman he loved corrupted by the literally and himself corrupted by them mentally. Also worth noting was his closeness with Metpheis. He weeped at his death. The whole arc was emotionally grueling for Haruo so like her he probably needed to be put out of his misery. Like Coolio and unlike the Houta he can’t live a normal life, he was raised by the streets. Or in this case the hatred of humanities past war


It was definitely a grueling journey for Haruo. I like how each of these films takes a broader view of the proceedings as Haruo's own perspective is broadened. Planet of the Monsters puts the audience in the thick of a military endeavor as humanity fights to reclaim the planet from Godzilla, but by the end of The Planet Eater the bigger picture comes into view and it's clear that Haruo had been embroiled in the cycle of demise since the beginning.

Humanity brought about Godzilla on Earth when Haruo was a child and his fear became a deep-seeded hatred over time, cushioned in pride and a misguided sense of humanity. Haruo's hatred led to dozens of his comrades dying in futile battle against Godzilla and it was nearly the catalyst for Ghidorah taking root in this world. That cycle of demise had taken countless worlds before but Haruo managed to break it. Then Lazzari inadvertently threatened to revive it with the Bilusaludo's nanometal.

Haruo knew that his mental link to Ghidorah originated with his hatred for Godzilla. Fear is natural but hatred is a pitfall and Haruo admired how the Houtua didn't even have a word for hate. He wanted them to continue to live in peace and balance with Godzilla and the planet, and he didn't want his friends to replicate their past civilization, so Haruo took all of that potential for corruption and burned it up. The Houtua's annual ritual seems meant to reconcile their fears in a healthy way and they acknowledge Haruo's intent with their chant: "Our Wrathful Lord. Please purify us again this year. Please forget the curses with this flame."
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Psycho Soldier » Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:42 am

I appreciate that; thank you. Now that we've had the discussion, I still think the trilogy is skeptical of civilization itself, but the ending's ambiguity leaves room for questioning. We're not inclined to see Mothra as a threat to humans, but that comes as much from franchise tradition as her role in the story of the trilogy. Plus, we see her primarily through the eyes of the protagonists. It also seems whenever humans and aliens worship monsters--Mothra, Ghidorah, Mechagodzilla (not in a religious sense, perhaps, but in a similar vein)--in 66.6% of cases, it works out poorly for the worshipers and their civilizations. We don't know if or how Mothra and the Houtua might prove different, but comparisons to the Exif and Bilusaludo are downplayed quite a bit, as I recall.

It's a lot to sift through casually like this. For all this intellectual meat to consume, I wish the trilogy were more watchable so I could have an even more detailed discussion. I just can't see myself sitting through Part 1 again, even if Parts 2 and 3 deliver some goods. I hope the next anime project (if there is one) comes from Madhouse, Studio Trigger or another good studio like them. At a minimum, I need to see a better script and more creative use of the animation medium. If you're not bound to rubber suits, do the right thing--make Godzilla fly again.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Mexigojira » Tue Jan 22, 2019 2:21 am

Well, have to say, this ws an interesting experiment, of how would Godzilla would look as an anime.

Personally, I wont say I was dissapointed, after knowing that Gen Urobuchi was behind the script, I kinda knew were this was going, still hoped to see some kaiju vs kaiju action, but nonetheless, maybe I'm alone on this, but for me the trilogy wasn't a total dissapointment, there were some interesting ideas.

I heva ethe impressio thta alot of people though this would be more like a classic Godzilla movie, with alot of monster fights, rather than a philosopical movie about revenge, and got really dissapointed, even angry.

I guess next time Toho could come with another anime, but this time, could be a good idea to be more about monster battles, of course, with an interesting story, even if its just a short animated series.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby angilas » Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:10 am

Benjamin Haines wrote:
angilas wrote:^^interesting interpretation. I guess there’s a bit of Haruo ending the cycle of violence and hatred in there by him offing himself and the last bit of corrupting tech. I think hearing it was billusado tech reminded him of what he almost became and the need to eradicate it and the last vestiges of nano along with the woman he loved corrupted by them literally and himself corrupted by them mentally. Also worth noting was his closeness with Metpheis. He weeped at his death. The whole arc was emotionally grueling for Haruo so like her he probably needed to be put out of his misery. Like Coolio and unlike the Houta he can’t live a normal life, he was raised by the streets. Or in this case the hatred of humanities past war


It was definitely a grueling journey for Haruo. I like how each of these films takes a broader view of the proceedings as Haruo's own perspective is broadened. Planet of the Monsters puts the audience in the thick of a military endeavor as humanity fights to reclaim the planet from Godzilla, but by the end of The Planet Eater the bigger picture comes into view and it's clear that Haruo had been embroiled in the cycle of demise since the beginning.

Humanity brought about Godzilla on Earth when Haruo was a child and his fear became a deep-seeded hatred over time, cushioned in pride and a misguided sense of humanity. Haruo's hatred led to dozens of his comrades dying in futile battle against Godzilla and it was nearly the catalyst for Ghidorah taking root in this world. That cycle of demise had taken countless worlds before but Haruo managed to break it. Then Lazzari inadvertently threatened to revive it with the Bilusaludo's nanometal.

Haruo knew that his mental link to Ghidorah originated with his hatred for Godzilla. Fear is natural but hatred is a pitfall and Haruo admired how the Houtua didn't even have a word for hate. He wanted them to continue to live in peace and balance with Godzilla and the planet, and he didn't want his friends to replicate their past civilization, so Haruo took all of that potential for corruption and burned it up. The Houtua's annual ritual seems meant to reconcile their fears in a healthy way and they acknowledge Haruo's intent with their chant: "Our Wrathful Lord. Please purify us again this year. Please forget the curses with this flame."


One thing I do like about this film is that it has a moral lesson. I feel that was something common in cinema. While some hate being hit over the head with it, most films now just seem to be out for profit. Not saying that wasn’t a primary concern here, and while I would have much preferred a trilogy that showed off Tohos kaiju catalogue, the message here is meaningful. It’s easy to get caught up in the cycle of hate if you aren’t careful. I guess that’s a lesson in Star Wars etc too.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Benjamin Haines » Thu Jan 24, 2019 1:23 am

Mexigojira wrote:maybe I'm alone on this, but for me the trilogy wasn't a total dissapointment, there were some interesting ideas.


You are not alone! I've been very pleasantly surprised by just how original, unconventional and thought-provoking this Godzilla anime trilogy turned out to be.


Psycho Soldier wrote:I appreciate that; thank you. Now that we've had the discussion, I still think the trilogy is skeptical of civilization itself, but the ending's ambiguity leaves room for questioning. We're not inclined to see Mothra as a threat to humans, but that comes as much from franchise tradition as her role in the story of the trilogy. Plus, we see her primarily through the eyes of the protagonists. It also seems whenever humans and aliens worship monsters--Mothra, Ghidorah, Mechagodzilla (not in a religious sense, perhaps, but in a similar vein)--in 66.6% of cases, it works out poorly for the worshipers and their civilizations. We don't know if or how Mothra and the Houtua might prove different, but comparisons to the Exif and Bilusaludo are downplayed quite a bit, as I recall.

It's a lot to sift through casually like this. For all this intellectual meat to consume, I wish the trilogy were more watchable so I could have an even more detailed discussion. I just can't see myself sitting through Part 1 again, even if Parts 2 and 3 deliver some goods. I hope the next anime project (if there is one) comes from Madhouse, Studio Trigger or another good studio like them. At a minimum, I need to see a better script and more creative use of the animation medium. If you're not bound to rubber suits, do the right thing--make Godzilla fly again.


The trilogy is definitely skeptical of civilization. I think it's specifically critical of the post-atomic civilization of the modern era. The Houtua seem to be there to suggest that civilization can be done better, that we can be more in touch with our own humanity by living in balance with our planet. Of course, the ending leaves those prospects ambiguous because of both Mothra's unknown intent and the question of how the Houtua's civilization will develop over time. Haruo prevented them from being cursed by the mistakes of past civilizations and the final post-credits scene suggests that they understood his intent, at least for several years. Over time, as the people who knew Haruo eventually pass on, would the lessons of his sacrifice fade from memory? Would the Houtua's civilization eventually crave prosperity at the expense of nature through science and technology, all on their own?

I've probably watched Planet of the Monsters close to 10 times over the past year. But then, I'm insane. With Toho and Legendary both now bringing Godzilla to life exclusively through CGI, we're at a point where even the live-action films feature Godzilla as an animated character. I'm expecting King of the Monsters to fill the niche for old-fashioned monster rumbles with physics-defying animated action.


angilas wrote:One thing I do like about this film is that it has a moral lesson. I feel that was something common in cinema. While some hate being hit over the head with it, most films now just seem to be out for profit. Not saying that wasn’t a primary concern here, and while I would have much preferred a trilogy that showed off Tohos kaiju catalogue, the message here is meaningful. It’s easy to get caught up in the cycle of hate if you aren’t careful. I guess that’s a lesson in Star Wars etc too.


The Godzilla movies that stand out as unique historically tend to be films that have a socially relevant point to make. G'54, Mothra vs. Godzilla, Godzilla's Revenge, Hedorah and GMK all come to mind. Between Shin Godzilla and the anime trilogy, I'm glad that the Toho of today is putting the series in the hands of filmmakers who have something to say.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby klen7 » Fri Jan 25, 2019 1:00 pm

Mexigojira wrote:there were some interesting ideas.

Aside from the visuals, this is probably my biggest disappointment. There were a lot of legitimately interesting ideas, but to quote a friend they were more like writing prompts

Idea: What if Godzilla were plant based?!
Fan: Umm ok i guess? so what does that change? Hold on. come back. Are we going to revisit this?

Idea: What if we reveal there is more than one Godzilla?
Fan: That's an interesting reveal, how many? is the world full of them? is it just two? wait! is this ever going to be mentioned again?

Idea: What if there are these flying bird monsters that share Godzilla's DNA?
Fan: Oh cool, kind of like a flock of Gyaos? That would be cool, do the humans fight them? does Godzilla fight them? wait! are we going to revisit this?

Idea: What if this Godzilla is like the biggest ever?!
Fan: Bigger is better, but it looks the same size as the little one because of the cheap animation and absence of points of reference or ground shots? wait are we going to revisit this?

Idea: What if Godzilla shoots his beam from an area in front of his nose and can sling an energy wave from his tale?
Fan: Umm... I guess i have to allow it, Shin Godzilla did something different, Heisei Godzilla mixed things up too. At least it will make for a more dynamic kaiju battle, right?

Idea: What if Mechagodzilla had multiple forms that it could transform into because it is made with nano-metal?
Fan: Oh cool, can't wait to see those in action... the design is a little odd, but once we see it in action it'll make sense? We are going to get to see all those in action right?

Idea: But what if Mechagodzilla took the form of a city?!
Fan: Ummm and then turned into a Mechagodzilla? is it at least shaped like mechagodzilla? Wait how is this different from any other city?

Idea: What if there are tentacle monsters that capture girls and pull their legs open?
Fan: No! Bad anime! This is why we couldn't talk about you publicly during the 90s! ... Does Godzilla fight them? Wait... will we even see these mentioned again?

Idea: What if humanity is now part bug?!
Fan: ummm... wait... is this like the plant thing? are we going to revisit this?

Idea: What if Godzilla was part of all civilization's destinies to be created?
Fan: Is this what the plant thing was about? No? what about the other Godzilla that spawned after civilization was destroyed? No? I give up, just show me Ghidorah...

There are a lot of cool ideas, but the execution fails to bring them to life. It's fine to let the ideas speak for themselves on the screen and in the narrative, but this series is packed with exposition dumps and for the most part leaves these dangling narratively and visually. Going back to my thoughts on the first movie, i think the strength of these movies are in their implications, but much like a writing prompt its left up to the viewer to develop these, which can be interesting but it is not good story telling, because of this I don't think people should be surprised by how strongly many fans dislike this series given the visual story telling nature of tokusatsu.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby canofhumdingers » Fri Jan 25, 2019 3:44 pm

I finally got around to watching this last night. Eh. Pretty much what everyone else has said. Lots of neat ideas and implications that are rarely properly explored and are delivered in the most uninspired and lifeless presentation imaginable. This trilogy could have been absolutely amazing if only the execution had been better.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby jellydonut25 » Wed Jan 30, 2019 10:40 am

klen7 wrote:
Mexigojira wrote:there were some interesting ideas.

Aside from the visuals, this is probably my biggest disappointment. There were a lot of legitimately interesting ideas, but to quote a friend they were more like writing prompts

Idea: What if Godzilla were plant based?!
Fan: Umm ok i guess? so what does that change? Hold on. come back. Are we going to revisit this?

Idea: What if we reveal there is more than one Godzilla?
Fan: That's an interesting reveal, how many? is the world full of them? is it just two? wait! is this ever going to be mentioned again?

Idea: What if there are these flying bird monsters that share Godzilla's DNA?
Fan: Oh cool, kind of like a flock of Gyaos? That would be cool, do the humans fight them? does Godzilla fight them? wait! are we going to revisit this?

Idea: What if this Godzilla is like the biggest ever?!
Fan: Bigger is better, but it looks the same size as the little one because of the cheap animation and absence of points of reference or ground shots? wait are we going to revisit this?

Idea: What if Godzilla shoots his beam from an area in front of his nose and can sling an energy wave from his tale?
Fan: Umm... I guess i have to allow it, Shin Godzilla did something different, Heisei Godzilla mixed things up too. At least it will make for a more dynamic kaiju battle, right?

Idea: What if Mechagodzilla had multiple forms that it could transform into because it is made with nano-metal?
Fan: Oh cool, can't wait to see those in action... the design is a little odd, but once we see it in action it'll make sense? We are going to get to see all those in action right?

Idea: But what if Mechagodzilla took the form of a city?!
Fan: Ummm and then turned into a Mechagodzilla? is it at least shaped like mechagodzilla? Wait how is this different from any other city?

Idea: What if there are tentacle monsters that capture girls and pull their legs open?
Fan: No! Bad anime! This is why we couldn't talk about you publicly during the 90s! ... Does Godzilla fight them? Wait... will we even see these mentioned again?

Idea: What if humanity is now part bug?!
Fan: ummm... wait... is this like the plant thing? are we going to revisit this?

Idea: What if Godzilla was part of all civilization's destinies to be created?
Fan: Is this what the plant thing was about? No? what about the other Godzilla that spawned after civilization was destroyed? No? I give up, just show me Ghidorah...

There are a lot of cool ideas, but the execution fails to bring them to life. It's fine to let the ideas speak for themselves on the screen and in the narrative, but this series is packed with exposition dumps and for the most part leaves these dangling narratively and visually. Going back to my thoughts on the first movie, i think the strength of these movies are in their implications, but much like a writing prompt its left up to the viewer to develop these, which can be interesting but it is not good story telling, because of this I don't think people should be surprised by how strongly many fans dislike this series given the visual story telling nature of tokusatsu.

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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby Mexigojira » Sat Feb 02, 2019 7:29 pm

Been reading some reviews, as far as I've read, I think at the end, people just wanted a Godzilla fight.

Well, hope to see more Godzilla anime, maybe something more traditional, would love a Godzilla anime with Jet Jaguar on it.
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Re: Godzilla: The Planet Eater (spoilers)

Postby lhb412 » Sun Feb 03, 2019 7:53 pm

Mexigojira wrote:Been reading some reviews, as far as I've read, I think at the end, people just wanted a Godzilla fight.


Well, besides the fridging of Yuko and the Shobijin fetish (the only things I found truly disagreeable) the trilogy's cardinal sin is being boring, not by virtue of being uninteresting, but by virtue of everything taking too long.

I think everything could be cut down, including the Godzilla scenes, especially in the third one. In terms of pacing I think the second movie is the best. I'd largely leave that one untouched. With the first movie I'd cut down the Godzilla Centric second half. Many complained about the spaceship-bound first part of the movie, but that's all necessary for the plot. The third movie can just be whittled down everywhere, and more brevity would have lent to the story's tension and suspense, instead of allowing those things to dissipate. The horror of a helpless Godzilla being drawn into the sky loses effect when you're seeing basically the same shot with little difference over and over again. It's the difference between "how will they ever get out of this?" and "this is taking so long that I no longer care."
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