The Comic Book Thread

Talk about anything on your mind!

Moderator: Controllers

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby Dr Kain » Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:37 pm

These arrived today:

Image
Image
User avatar
Dr Kain
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 9925
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 4:00 pm
Location: Englewood CO but originally from Buffalo NY

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby tbeasley » Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:51 pm

Dark Horse Reveals Mike Mignola’s ‘Hellboy in Hell’ Library Edition
Image
Hellboy's final adventure isn't the only thing getting the hardcover treatment from Dark Horse. Get ready for 'B.P.R.D.: Hell on Earth' Deluxe Vol. # 1!

Image

I hope the Plague of Frogs hardcovers are reprinted someday... I got the first volume but no the others.
~ Tyler

This is indeed a disturbing universe.
User avatar
tbeasley
Godzilla
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: South MS

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby lhb412 » Wed Mar 22, 2017 8:03 pm

WOOHOO! Can't wait to have the complete Mignola Hellboy (on the current 'Hellboy and the BPRD' series he's just the co-writer) in oversized hardcover.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 12562
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby Dr Kain » Fri Mar 24, 2017 1:47 am

Couldn't pass this up given it was onnly $25:

Image
Image
User avatar
Dr Kain
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 9925
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 4:00 pm
Location: Englewood CO but originally from Buffalo NY

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby lhb412 » Fri Mar 24, 2017 8:03 pm

YEEEHAAAW! DC is hitting the Kirby reprint motherload this fall and winter: I'm already really looking forward to the Kamandi omnibus this summer, but starting in November there's Mister Miracle, The Demon, and Challengers of the Unknown paperbacks and an enormous Fourth World omnibus! I suppose since Mister Miracle is getting a paperback that the other three Kirby books in the Fourth World saga will also be reprinted individually in paperback, but I think I'll go with that big honking hardcover.

.... ahhhh, and a huge Swamp Thing omnibus collecting everything up to Alan Moore's reboot, too!!!

ImageImageImage
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 12562
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby Dr Kain » Mon Mar 27, 2017 11:32 pm

I've now completed what has come out so far for the Stan Lee/Jack Kirby era of Fantastic Four. Hopefully Volume 4 isn't too far behind.

Image
Image
User avatar
Dr Kain
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 9925
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 4:00 pm
Location: Englewood CO but originally from Buffalo NY

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Mar 30, 2017 6:56 am

User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 6795
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby klen7 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 8:35 am

I have always found it to be frustrating trying to find collections of old Marvel monster comics due how painfully incomplete they are.. Fortunately it looks like they are about to remedy that with two "Monsterbus" releases giving us over 1700 pages of vintage monsters from Kirby, Stan Lee and Larry Lieber

https://www.amazon.com/Monsters-Vol-Mar ... 302908618/

https://www.amazon.com/Monsters-Vol-Mar ... 302908626/
User avatar
klen7
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 6424
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:34 pm
Location: beyond your peripheral vision

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby lhb412 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:43 pm

^I think both Marvel and DC have hit a spate of great classic reprints this year, especially in regards to Jack Kirby!
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 12562
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby lhb412 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 10:59 pm

How did it take three days after the announcement for me to learn that Stan Sakai is doing a 40 page Usagi Yojimbo/TMNT team-up comic? I'm supposed to be this huge fan and it just flew past me! Stan took a few months off from the regular Usagi series for some mystery project, and this is it. Should roughly coincide with Usagi's appearance in Nickelodeon's TMNT cartoon and toyline.

http://ew.com/books/2017/04/01/stan-sak ... ow_twitter

Image
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 12562
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby klen7 » Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:01 pm

@lhb412 - Do you know if there is a reason for a delay on Kitaro and the Great Tanuki War? I pre-ordered it last July and Amazon just notified me that there is no new estimate for delivery. It seems like its out in the wild, so maybe Amazon got a very limited stock?
User avatar
klen7
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 6424
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:34 pm
Location: beyond your peripheral vision

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby lhb412 » Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:05 pm

^Zack Davisson (the translator) mentioned on his twitter last week that he just did the final proofreading of the translation, so I automatically assumed it was running behind schedule and we wouldn't be getting it this week.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 12562
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby klen7 » Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:23 pm

Thanks! Glad its not canceled :)

::EDIT:: Amazon now has April 28th as release date :)
User avatar
klen7
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 6424
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:34 pm
Location: beyond your peripheral vision

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby lhb412 » Wed Apr 19, 2017 8:16 pm

^ Davisson says the next Kitaro volume, The Great Tanuki War, has been rescheduled for June. So it was delayed two months.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 12562
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby Dr Kain » Sat Apr 22, 2017 9:57 am

I finished reading the Spectacular issues of the Roger Stern Omnibus last night and I gotta say that those stories were on par with the stories I have read that Stan Lee wrote. Roger also made me like Beetle, which has never been done before. Peter is a pimp though. In the stories I have read over the last few months he has gone through Betty, MJ, Gwen, Debbie, and now Marcy (who I never knew about before as I don't remember her from any cartoon or the 90s comics). :D Only about 15 more issues until I get to Hobgoblin's introduction, I cannot wait!
Image
User avatar
Dr Kain
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 9925
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 4:00 pm
Location: Englewood CO but originally from Buffalo NY

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Sat Apr 22, 2017 8:09 pm

Marvel Comics Going Retro for 'Legacy' Relaunch
Graeme McMillan wrote:This fall, Marvel Entertainment is going back to its comic book roots.

The company announced Marvel Legacy during Saturday's Marvel: Next Big Thing panel at the C2E2 comic convention in Chicago — a relaunch of its superhero comic book line that will refocus on its long history and most iconic characters.

The fall relaunch will follow the conclusion of the current Secret Empire storyline — in which Hydra, as led by a corrupted Captain America, has taken over the United States — and see a renewed focus on "hope, wonder, enjoyment and fun," according to the publisher. It also will see a number of changes for the comics themselves, including a restoration of "legacy numbering" on long-running series — which is to say, an issue number that will reflect the overall cumulative number of issues published, as opposed to the number in that particular volume. For example, Captain America: Steve Rogers would jump from somewhere in the early 20s to an issue number closer to 690. There will also be a new consistent cover design across the line reminiscent of Marvel's 1980s and '90s output.

Some of the retro moves Marvel is planning go back even further, with the return of both the Marvel Value Stamp — a collectable clip-and-save program from the mid-1970s and F.O.O.M., a self-published Marvel fanzine from the same era (The title is an acronym for "Friends Of Ol' Marvel"), reportedly underway.

"The Marvel Legacy initiative is a celebration of everything that makes Marvel the best in fiction and it’s a signifier of a new era for Marvel Comics," Marvel CCO Joe Quesada said in a statement. "It’s a loving look at the heart of Marvel as we embrace our roots and move enthusiastically forward with all the Marvel characters you know and love starring in the biggest, boldest, best Marvel stories. All of which kicks off with the giant Marvel Legacy special."

The Marvel Legacy special will be a 50-page comic book by The Mighty Thor and Doctor Strange writer Jason Aaron and Secret Wars artist Esad Ribic that will set up the new status quo for the comic book universe, and return a fan-favorite character into active service — although, of course, Marvel isn't revealing just who right now. The issue is scheduled for a fall release, although no official date was revealed just yet; the cover for the issue will come from Joe Quesada himself.

More information about Marvel Legacy — including the complete line-up of titles and attached creators — will be released in coming months.

MARVEL's LEGACY Brings Back Original Numbering, 'Hope, Wonder, Enjoyment & Fun' and a 'Beloved Mainstay'
Image
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 6795
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby tbeasley » Tue May 09, 2017 7:19 pm

~ Tyler

This is indeed a disturbing universe.
User avatar
tbeasley
Godzilla
 
Posts: 800
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: South MS

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby lhb412 » Wed May 10, 2017 9:25 am

Found this in a used bookshop the other day. It's a facsimile edition original published in 1954.

Image

It collects comics from the first two years of Mad Magazine, with the panels somewhat awkwardly formatted vertically - so you read the book on it's side. That weird formatting is because at the time there was no precedent for trade paperbacks and so it was made to fit in with normal paperback books, and this is the very first paperback comic book reprint in the US! It is trade paperback patient zero!

I know I've seen some similarly formatted Marvel reprints from the '70s.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 12562
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby canofhumdingers » Thu May 11, 2017 8:10 pm

Weird. Can you post a picture? I'm having trouble picturing the format you describe.
User avatar
canofhumdingers
Burning Godzilla
 
Posts: 2465
Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2003 11:17 pm
Location: TN -> MS -> LA -> TN -> MN -> TX -> where next?

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby lhb412 » Thu May 11, 2017 9:15 pm

This eBay listing gives a good look at the book's insides:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/The-MAD-Reader- ... Sw42dZDbaV

Image

Apparently it was popular enough that Mad paperback reprints were done in this format for decades, as I said: the first paperback comic reprints commonly found in bookstores and the predecessor to todays culturally enshrined tpb and graphic novel. I've seen some Marvel reprints in a similar style from the '70s (reprints of '60s Lee/Kirby/Ditko stuff). Even though more 'respectful' (at least in terms of retaining or surpassing the original size and print quality of the artwork) reprints began being published in the '70s and '80s as recently as the mid-'80s Usagi Yojimbo's paperback collections were formatted much smaller than usual comic book size (about 6 x 9 inches) because there was simply no comic book sized section for something like that in a bookstore, and the book would have been shelved in section with miscellaneous, humor and gift books that would be formatted smaller. In fact, I notice that a lot of Dark Horse books are still in this format. I think First Second Publishing and some other indie publishers use it, too.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 12562
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Sat May 13, 2017 1:53 am

Mister Miracle #1 Cover by Nick Derington
Image
Paste Magazine May 12, 2017:
Exclusive: Tom King & Mitch Gerads Attempt to Escape the Absurdity of 2017 in Heady New Mister Miracle Comic
Sean Edgar wrote:Shortly before the release of his debut issue on Batman last summer, Tom King awoke in the emergency room. The former CIA officer and comic writer behind such modern classics as The Sheriff of Babylon, The Vision and The Omega Men anticipated a heart attack that would send him to an early grave. Fortunately, the diagnosis revealed a severe panic attack. Though King didn’t pass into the great beyond, he returned to a reality that didn’t quite feel the same. “I’d flirted with the edge of death and came back from it, and I woke up and the whole world seemed different. I don’t mean this in a political way, but the world as it is today—what’s happening every single day—doesn’t seem to make any sense. And that can be as simple as the Super Bowl didn’t make sense. Or it can be as crazy as people are breaking laws in our country that shouldn’t ever be broken,” King explains on the phone.

His illustrating partner on Sheriff, Mitch Gerads, chimes in: “The Cubs won the World Series.”

The pair is discussing their upcoming series, Mister Miracle, about a cosmic Jesus Christ analogue who’s also an escape artist, and how in this moment, it’s very, very hard not to feel trapped in a never-ending loop of the bizarre, anxious and absurd. But if their previous collaboration is any indication, the project won’t offer any escapism. King and Gerads excel at creating incredibly likable characters who attempt to untangle doomed causes—a legacy perfect for this new book.

Mister Miracle was created by comic trailblazer Jack Kirby in the early ‘70s after his fallout with Marvel over creator rights. The yellow, red and green superhero fronted a line of comics loosely identified as The Fourth World, a kaleidoscope-colored remix of the Bible with Wagnerian battles and sci-fi bombast. In the mythos, Miracle (born Scott Free) was imprisoned on an industrial hellscape planet called Apokolips before escaping to his family on the paradise of New Genesis. King describes the saga—which ran through comics including the New Gods and The Forever People—like “dipping your head into madness.”

And though Mister Miracle could escape any terror orphanage, death trap or elaborate constraint, Free perpetually felt trapped in his childhood nightmare. The character fits perfectly in King’s oeuvre of tragic irony, including the tortured space radicals of The Omega Men and the imploding dreams of The Vision—all portraits of gods with destructive vulnerabilities. It’s also a new, bright canvas for Gerads, whose work has mostly addressed military and street-level intrigue, further adding empathy to the almighty. The artist channels an intoxicating array of visuals for the project, mimicking distortion lines on antique tube TVs and tactile watercolor backdrops.

Lettered with dire detail by Clayton Cowles and edited by Jamie Rich, the first chapter of this 12-issue series launches in August. (Spoiler Alert: it’s excellent.) Publisher DC offered Paste a first look at the comic as well as chance to discuss this ambitious new series with King and Gerads.

Paste: The first time I heard about this project, I thought, you guys are going to humanize the divine. Kirby specialized in these grand, spectacular space operas that don’t have the subtlety or vulnerability I associate with The Sheriff of Babylon. Is that the challenge, to unite the cosmic with the intimate?

Tom King: I don’t think that’s the challenge, I think that’s the theme. In going back and reading all of Kirby, you’re dipping your head in genius. No one can out-Kirby Kirby. You can’t make an epic as great as he did. It’s like trying to make Star Wars again, or like trying to rewrite the Iliad. You can take those grand cosmic space opera themes and internalize them and use them to tell a very personal story. That’s what appealed to me about it. We were going to take the bigness of Kirby and turn that into the intimacy of Mister Miracle’s life. Kirby used a metaphor for his time, written in the late ‘60s early ‘70s when the world was going utterly insane. We’re going to use it as a metaphor for our time, the late 2010s, when once again the world is going insane. It’s almost like we’re holding up a mirror to that work, or internalizing it. We’re going step-in-step with him.

Paste: Tom, your Best Intentions trilogy of The Sheriff of Babylon, The Omega Men and The Vision personally referenced your experience resolving conflict in the middle east as a CIA agent. Do you feel a kinship with Kirby, whose time in World War II served a similar purpose inspiring his comics?

King: It’s hard to ever compare yourself to the generation that fought Hitler and saved the world. I do feel a kinship with and draw inspiration from artists who did go through that experience, and came out to the other side with their eyes a little too open to the world. Kirby served, and I served in my way, but that guy was in gunfire and I was just trying to get terrorists to spy on each other. Both of us want to punch Nazis in the face, so we have that.

Paste: Mitch, there’s so much going on in Mister Miracle #1. I’m seeing Ben-Day dots, selective blurring, watercolor textures, tube TV distortion. It’s heavily atmospheric. How is this challenging you as an artist? What are your main goals?

Mitch Gerads: The book has been a crazy experience. It’s very challenging and it’s also exactly the opposite of that. Because of the theme of how Tom and I are approaching the story, it allows me to play with reality. When I do my art, I tend to be very inspired by what I’m consuming at that time, and I remember doing issue one of Mister Miracle and being very inspired by ‘60s magazine illustrators: Austin Briggs, Al Parker. I think a lot of that came through, but one of the nice things is, because of the nature of the book, as we go forward I can still be influenced by what I’m consuming at that time and just evolve with it. I get to use the reality-bending nature of the book as an excuse to do that.

Paste: Mister Miracle seems more cinematic and visual than your previous collaboration.

Gerads: Sheriff is completely grounded in reality. For all intents and purposes, it definitely could have happened. Mister Miracle is super fun because I get to play with fantasy, but at the same time, I think I play with fantasy differently than most comic book artists. I still play with it in the real world. One of the fun things for me is taking all of these Kirby designs and taking the crazy world of New Genesis and the crazy world of Apokolips and boiling it down to more Game of Thrones. All that stuff is still there and the motifs can still be there. But I’m bringing it down to a base level that everyone can understand, and feels a bit more tactile and real.

Paste: Why do you think Kirby’s neo-Christian mythos is still relevant today?

King: I think it’s a few things. If you actually read the New Gods tetralogy, this epic without an ending, it’s like dipping your head into madness. You feel a little bit like the Joker for a little while. And I mean that in the best way possible. It’s that feeling you get when you see a piece of art you can’t comprehend. I’ve been at this long enough and I know a lot of the creators, and I can see behind comics. I see what you’re trying to do, I see how they did this. I read Kirby’s stuff and I don’t see how they did this. He touched the id of America and let it flow through his fingers. There are a thousand ideas on one page and they don’t add up and then they do add up and they come apart and they come back together. Half of them are an easy metaphor to see and then the metaphor falls apart. It’s just utter insanity.

Yet somehow, that utter insanity became the modern myth of America. You read New Gods, and you say that’s where Star Wars came from. It’s 100%. You can just see it on the page. This is why my kids wear Fantastic Four pajamas. This is why when I walk out in the street every day, I see half of the people wearing superhero t-shirts. This is the spine of our modern American myth, and it came from this outpouring of insanity from a man who, for all accounts and purposes, should have been past his prime. He should have done his best work, but instead, he channeled the energy of this new generation that was rebelling against this new perceived fascism into a child art form. How can you not try to catch that in your hands and do something with it?

Paste: Reading the first issue, I couldn’t help but think of Mister Miracle as an evolution of The Last Temptation of Christ, a son of a god attempting to escape his identity.

King: When I first started doing this project, I started talking with creators like Mark Waid and one of the things I came across was people saying, you didn’t know Mister Miracle was Jack Kirby’s Jesus? He’s Jesus as an escape artist. That’s utterly ridiculous, but the writer in you is like I get to play with Jesus as an escape artist. On the other side of that you have Darkseid, who’s the horrible evil that walks. There are religious themes in this, but it’s all inspired by Kirby. He was drawing on Old Testament and the New Testament to make a kids adventure. That’s why it worked—he’s telling old stories in new ways. So now we’re going to try the old Jack Kirby stories in new ways. We’re going to go as deep as we can.

Paste: In the first issue, Darkseid is only hinted at through these ominous, rhythmic black boxes with the sole text “Darkseid is” in varying fonts. How are you approaching the character both from a thematic and craft perspective?

King: “Darkseid is” is taken from Grant Morrison’s JLA run in the early ‘90s. He captured what Kirby had captured, which is that Darkseid isn’t just a big guy who wants to take over the world. He’s not Mongul. He’s not even Thanos, a guy obsessed with death. He’s the evil inside of us. He’s the darkness. He’s the thing inside of us that calls us to do the wrong thing or be warped the wrong way. That’s inescapable: Darkseid exists. That’s there.

Gerads: He’s the only comic book villain that I’m legitimately afraid of. When I was a kid, Darkseid scared the heck out of me. I don’t think it ever went away. My mom brought home a Burger King happy meal, and it had this little cup holder. Different DC characters have their arms outstretched, with cups that go in front. My mom brought home Darkseid and I just started crying. I wanted no part of it.

King: I want to credit a webcomic artist named Julian Lytle. He’s an old friend of mine, and we met at a con. I was telling him about Mister Miracle, and he said: “Darkseid is.” And I said, “What do you mean Darkseid is?” He’s that thing that you can’t deny is there, that’s pushing you toward darkness. And he kept saying “Darkseid is” over and over again, and as I was talking to him, I saw the black panels. It’s always there in the background. It comes from that conversation with Julian.

Paste: Tom, you’ve described this as “an epic about a harrowing tale trying not to be told.” That’s an amazing contradiction. Why would an epic not want to be told?

King: I think because it’s your epic, or it’s like in an interview like this, or when you talk to someone—you don’t want to reveal the actual epic that’s inside of you. The core of you. That’s something that you always keep hidden from everyone. The actual struggles you have every day. You make up things, and you say things and biographers or autobiographers write about them. The real hidden secrets and the real hidden battles—that’s the story that you don’t want told. You don’t want that exposed. That’s what we’re doing for Mister Miracle. He’s confronting that part of him that doesn’t want to be told.

Paste: Looking at the entire concept of escape, what do you both try to escape in your own lives that’s going to trickle into the themes here?

King: I try to escape two things at once, and I think that’s the problem. If you’re a writer, you’re constantly doubting yourself. You’re constantly saying this isn’t right, this is "OH GODZILLA! WHAT TERRIBLE LANGUAGE!", this is terrible. But then on the other side, overconfidence will kill any writing you do: you stop doubting yourself, you’re "OH GODZILLA! WHAT TERRIBLE LANGUAGE!". You escape this trap of doubt to this trap of confidence, you escape the trap of confidence to the trap of doubt. You’re stuck in a catch 22 of screaming anxiety. And that’s when you write, “Page One, Panel One.”

Gerads: I think Scott Free, in this book, really embodies what a lot of us, if not the vast majority of us, are feeling right now: being surrounded by a world that doesn’t make as much sense as it used to. I really sympathize with Scott, and as the book goes on you sympathize with him more. There’s so much in the book of just him giving weird looks to people. In a way, it’s Jim from The Office giving looks to people half the time. He’s just trying to process the absurd. I think that’s something I try to escape. It’s hard to do this interview and not get super political. There’s so much in this world right now that isn’t lining up. You assumed there were safeguards in place to make sure things always do line up. It’s escaping that kind of world and trying to find the real world again. Hopefully that real world is still a thing that exists.

King: I wanted to write about the Trump era, but I didn’t want to write, “Fascism sucks” or “Trump sucks.” That doesn’t get you anywhere. You’re taking your Twitter feed and putting it in panels. What I wanted to do is capture the emotion of the period, and the anxiety, the way Alan Moore captured the anxiety of the ‘80s or Kirby captured the anxiety of the ‘70s or even Lee captured the optimism of the ‘60s; to capture the feeling, more than the politics. That’s what interests me. That’s how you make something that’s just not a polemic. After page four, the whole thing goes into a 9-panel grid, and it’s to give you a sense of that claustrophobia. To give you a sense of what it is to be trapped, not only in the themes and the words, but in the actual panel structure. He’s trapped behind those bars we had in Omega Men, and how does he break out?


The Buoyant, Kirby-esque, Pop-Art Pleasures of Michael Allred

Exclusive: Alex de Campi & Victor Santos Announce Cuban Revolution Noir Graphic Novel, Bad Girls

Moebius and Beyond: An Introduction to European Comics
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 6795
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby Dr Kain » Wed May 17, 2017 1:04 am

So I've read another batch of issues from the Roger Stern Omnibus.

First off, the issues with Hobgoblin have been pretty stellar thus far. I loved how the first two parter had him not ready to fight Spidey and then the second duo where he used a goon to act as him and had the guy killed. That was badass. I already like Rodney better than Jason. Although, I do have to laugh because Peter makes a comment about how Jack O'Lantern could be the Hobgoblin. :haha: If only he knew.

In addition, the two parter that featured Vulture and his origin were well done. It's pretty amazing to think it took them 239 issues before they revealed his backstory.

On the other hand, I found the Lance Bannon and Amy stuff to be quite mediocre. They weren't bad, but I am missing part of their story since they've clearly been around for longer than the stories in this Omnibus. Not sure why they felt the need to bring MJ back though since she is just as selfish as ever. At least they got rid of that horrid short curly hair do I last saw her with in the Lee/Romita Sr books. :D

It's nice see Harry back again and the day dreaming issue was fun.

Lastly, I know this is a Stern only book, but I do wish I was able to read all of the Spectacular stories that coincide with all of the events taking place here. Oh well. Maybe they'll someday collect them in either Omnibus or Epic form.
Image
User avatar
Dr Kain
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 9925
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 4:00 pm
Location: Englewood CO but originally from Buffalo NY

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Wed May 17, 2017 1:23 am

'Robotech' Trailer Reveals Comic Book Revival's New Look
Titan Comics has released a preview of the series, based on the fan-favorite 1980s animation.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 6795
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby Dr Kain » Wed May 17, 2017 9:03 am

The only people who still touch Robotech are those still clinging to nostalgia. Everyone else moved on.
Image
User avatar
Dr Kain
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 9925
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 4:00 pm
Location: Englewood CO but originally from Buffalo NY

Re: The Comic Book Thread

Postby lhb412 » Wed May 17, 2017 9:26 am

mr.negativity wrote:Mister Miracle #1 Cover by Nick Derington
Image
Paste Magazine May 12, 2017:
Exclusive: Tom King & Mitch Gerads Attempt to Escape the Absurdity of 2017 in Heady New Mister Miracle Comic


Glad that DC is doing an admirable job celebrating Kirby's 100th birthday with Mister Mirtacle, Bug, and Kamandi (and, later this year, some nice reprints)!

I mean, it's a bit odd they're doing a better job than Marvel, right? I don't even know what Marvel is doing for the occassion.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 12562
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

PreviousNext

Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest