TALKBACK #1: Gojira

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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira SXSW 2014

Postby mr.negativity » Mon Mar 10, 2014 2:36 pm

SXSW Unveils 2014 Lineup, Including World Debut of Seth Rogen's 'Neighbors'
1954's Godzilla: The Japanese Original, with a Q&A following with 2014 Godzilla director Gareth Edwards.

Jessica Chobot to Host GODZILLA Panel at SXSW!
Clarke Wolfe wrote:Did the premiere of the new Godzilla trailer yesterday cause your monster loving heart to flutter? Brace yourselves for a big announcement: Nerdist’s own Jessica Chobot will be hosting the Godzilla panel at SXSW next week! Chobot will be joined by director Gareth Edwards.

The panel will take place on Tuesday, March 11 at 9:30PM. In addition to a Q&A with Edwards, the panel will first feature a screening of the original 1954 classic Gojira, directed by Ishiro Honda. The version of the film being screened will feature 40 minutes of footage that were cut from the US release. Gojira celebrates its 60th anniversary this year.

For details on the panel and screening, click here.

Godzilla, directed by Gareth Edwards, opens on May 16.
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Re: Godzilla: The Japanese Original - SXSW 2014

Postby mr.negativity » Mon Mar 10, 2014 2:53 pm

GODZILLA: THE JAPANESE ORIGINAL
The 1954 classic Godzilla is one of the most influential monster films of all time. For its 60th anniversary in 2014, Rialto Pictures will re-release the restored Japanese original as envisioned by writer/director Ishiro Honda & SFX legend Eiji Tsuburaya incl. 40 mins cut from the US release version. Whether you’re a die-hard fan or have yet to witness the original, uncut masterpiece, this is the perfect time to see how the epic saga began. After join a Q&A w Gareth Edwards (2010’s Monsters) director of the new Godzilla from Warner Bros & Legendary Pictures out May 16, 2014. Godzilla® Gojira and the character design are trademarks of Toho Co., Ltd. © 1954 Toho Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby tbeasley » Thu May 08, 2014 1:02 am

I started my Honda Godzilla marathon today before the new movie and I had no idea it was Ishiro Honda's birthday. So I guess it was extra fitting I watched the original. Every time I view the film I leave with something different, or at least remember something I forgot from the previous viewing. I like to think if I weren't a Godzilla fan I'd enjoy the film just as much - and that nonfans check out the original before or after the new movie and get into the series as a whole.

I'm going to watch King Kong vs. Godzilla next. I've never seen the Japanese version, and I don't know this forum's stance on this sort of thing, but if I could get some help with obtaining the original version I'd appreciate it...
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby Dr Kain » Sun May 11, 2014 5:50 pm

In 1954 Ishiro Honda had directed a movie about a monster that was mean to symbolize the atomic bombs that had been dropped on Japan during World War II. Unbeknownst to Toho, this movie was about to become a worldwide phenomenon that was going to pave the way for a brand new type of genre in Japanese cinema known as the Kaiju genre. In addition to this genre in movies, it is thanks to “Godzilla” that we even have various super hero shows such as “Ultraman” and “Super Sentai.”

“Godzilla” is about a giant radioactive monster that resembles a dinosaur and brings destruction to everything in its wake. The movie starts off with several ships being destroyed all in the same area off the Coast of Odo Island. In time, Dr. Yamane, his daughter Emiko, and Emiko’s lover Odata venture to Odo Island after statements are made of a giant monster attacking the island have risen to public awareness. Some of the islanders believe it to be the work of a sea monster of legend named Godzilla, while others believe it is Mother Nature causing destruction. Nevertheless, Godzilla is revealed to be true during Dr. Yamane’s investigations on Odo Island and the Japanese government is left up to decide what to do with this proven monster’s existence.

One of the best thing about “Godzilla” is its ability to create a monstrous force of nature that represents the horrors of Japan’s past without turning it into a cheesy looking B movie that were known to be coming out in the United States at the time. “Godzilla” brings a sense of suspense as even the characters in the movie talk about surviving the nuclear attacks in Japan while knowing there is a giant monster lurking around at any moment to destroy the country. Not just that, but Ishiro Honda also showcased the horror the bombs brought to Japan even through the actions of its inhabitants during Godzilla’s attack, such as the woman telling her children that they are going to be meeting their dad soon, which is something rarely ever seen or felt in a monster movie of this caliber. In fact, that is one of the things that makes this masterpiece stand out amongst its brethren, as even though it is about a giant monster, it shows the horror of what the monster represents at every interval.

The characters themselves are well rounded and likable, even if some of them are under developed. Dr. Yamane’s disdain for the government wanting to destroy Godzilla instead of study him is an admirable one, as he is a scientist first and foremost. He wants to know how the monster survived a nuclear attack in order to find a way to help those effected by the nuclear holocaust. Emiko seems to be more of the generic female character, but Momoko Koichi plays off her role quite well for what she is. Odata is the exact opposite to Dr. Yamane, as he believes Godzilla needs to be destroyed for the better of Japan. He is pretty straight forward as they go. Finally, there is Dr. Serizawa, who seems to be the most interesting of the cast even though he is in the movie the least. Serizawa is a scientist with an implied past of helping the Germans during WWII and it is his experiments that lead to the defeat of Godzilla. He seems to be an extremely tragic and complicated character as he has created a weapon more power than an atomic bomb. He hates himself for it because he knows it will be used for evil regardless of his intentions even so to the point that he is willing to sacrifice his own life to ensure this never comes to fruition.
Unfortunately, the one character that feels like he was wasted is Shinkichi. He is a teenager whose family was killed when Godzilla first appeared on the island and then he is suddenly living with Dr. Yamane. While it was stated in later movies that Yamane had adopted him, the viewer is just left to wonder what he is even doing there as the movie states nothing of this at all. This is one moment were a simple line could have fixed this little issue. It also does not help that he really does nothing but stand in the background and let Odata know when someone has arrived. There is no bearing on his personality or how he feels about Godzilla nor the death of his family. I personally do not even know what the point of him being adopted by Yamane was, as nothing ever comes out of it.

Being that this is the first Godzilla movie ever, there is really nothing negative to say about the monster’s design. He looks like a giant walking weapon. The only negative would be that sometimes he face looks awkward during the close up shots due to the way his neck moves. It looks like it could be a sock puppet at times rather than a giant monster. It does not detract from the movie, but it seems laughable at times. Nevertheless, Godzilla is big and has a sense of destruction surrounding him. It is also amazing to see how useless Japan is against this creature as their plan to surround the coast with an electrical fence does little to halt Godzilla’s onslaught. He is a walking nuclear bomb and nothing can hold him back.

Lastly, the effects of the movie are still some of the best found in the entire series. The burning of Tokyo is tragic and looks like they actually set the city on fire even though they clearly have not. The breath of Godzilla comes off looking like a person’s breath would in the cold, but it brought an unexpected touch to the monster the first time you see him breath it on screen. All of this is brought together with an incredible score from composer Akira Ifukube, who provides a truly terrific theme for the title monster. His theme will come to be enjoyed by many for years to come and is still to this day one of the best movie character themes of all time.

Overall, I can give the movie nothing short of praises. It does have a few moments of oddity (such as some really weird scene edits) and Shinkichi is a wasted character, but the movie does what it is meant to do. Show the horrors of war and most of all, the terror of what a nuclear weapon can have on a populace that succumbs to its devastation. Unfortunately, out of the countless sequels, no movie in the franchise has been able to fully capture the essence Ishiro Honda brought forth in this movie. There are a few that have come close, but it seems like the majority pushed that aside as they tried to just turn Godzilla into a kid friendly super hero over the years. Even some of the later movies that made Godzilla a villain again seemed to forget what the monster was originally created for as time went on. Hopefully, someone in the future will be able to capture the spirit of this movie be it in another Godzilla sequel or maybe even in an entirely new series yet to be created. Despite its flaws, “Godzilla” deserves a grand 9/10 stars as it is not only the best in its genre, but one of the best movies ever made.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby mr.negativity » Sun Nov 02, 2014 5:35 am

WSJ:
Godzilla Was Very Different 60 Years Ago
Directors, Designers, Actors and Producers All Had Ideas on How Godzilla Should Look
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby mr.negativity » Mon Nov 03, 2014 7:37 pm

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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby lhb412 » Mon Nov 03, 2014 11:44 pm

Released this day 60 years ago.

Happy Birthday Godzilla!
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Nov 04, 2014 9:52 pm

SciFi Japan TV #15: City of Monsters

Godzilla appears in Tokyo as Setagaya Ward marks 60th anniversary of debut
TOMOKO SAITO wrote:Tokyo’s Setagaya Ward honored Godzilla on Nov. 3 as one of its most globally recognized citizens during a ceremony marking the 60th anniversary of the fictional prehistoric monster's big screen debut.

The award ceremony took place at Toho Studios in the ward’s Seijo district, where most of the Godzilla movies were filmed. The long-running franchise is one of the world's most popular movie series.

At the event, crowds looked on as Setagaya Mayor Nobuto Hosaka presented Minami Ichikawa, the director of the board at Toho, with a certificate. Also on hand was an actor in a Godzilla suit, no taller than the mayor, who appeared with the two in front of a 14-meter-high wall featuring a giant mural of the popular creature.

"Godzilla, born and raised in Setagaya,” Hosaka said. “He has made his name known across the world."

The original "Godzilla" movie was first screened on Nov. 3, 1954. In the 97-minute black-and-white film, the giant prehistoric monster attacks Tokyo after being awakened by a hydrogen bomb test in the Pacific Ocean.

The film was inspired by the Daigo Fukuryu Maru (Lucky Dragon No. 5) incident, whereby 23 crew members on board the Japanese tuna fishing boat suffered extensive radioactive contamination after they were exposed to fallout from a U.S. nuclear test on Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954.

"In a 1980s Godzilla film, a Japanese prime minister responds to American and Soviet threats to use tactical nuclear weapons on the creature by saying, 'Our nation will follow the three non-nuclear principles,' " Hosaka said on Nov. 3. "Godzilla films have continued to take a firm stance on nuclear disarmament and justice. They have also warned against mankind's arrogance and have stopped civilization from running wild countless times. I want to thank the series for continuously providing us with such thought-provoking themes."

The original film, with Ishiro Honda in the director's chair and aided by legendary special effects supervisor Eiji Tsuburaya, who would later go on to create the Ultraman series, became a major hit, attracting 9.61 million viewers at the box office in Japan alone.

The movie marked the beginning of the Japanese “kaiju” (strange creature) film craze. Films such as "Mothra vs. Godzilla" and "Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla" soon followed. A total of 30 films have been created in the franchise, including the latest, "Godzilla," which was produced in Hollywood and released in July.

All 28 Japanese Godzilla movies, which garnered a cumulative total of 99.75 million moviegoers, were filmed at Toho Studios.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Nov 07, 2014 4:00 pm

TotalFilm:
The seven ages of sci-fi (part two)
Five movies inspired by the bomb
Part Two - Nuclear paranoia
"When Man entered the atomic age, he opened a door into a new world" (1951-1962)
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby Joseph Goodman » Sun Dec 06, 2015 7:51 pm

For those who are interested in such things (and who are also skilled at making sense of the gibberish Google translate makes of Japanese), here's a somewhat in-depth article regarding the new 4k digital restoration that Toho ran in theaters in Japan last year:

http://www.stereosound.co.jp/review/art ... 34660.html

The most interesting detail that I could glean from this was that the master positive, which the the previous Toho and Criterion Blu-Ray discs were mastered from, was revealed to be further away from the long-gone camera negative than was thought, so this new scan should look even better than Criterion's master.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby canofhumdingers » Sun Dec 06, 2015 9:49 pm

Joseph Goodman wrote:The most interesting detail that I could glean from this was that the master positive, which the the previous Toho and Criterion Blu-Ray discs were mastered from, was revealed to be further away from the long-gone camera negative than was thought, so this new scan should look even better than Criterion's master.


That is an interesting detail and I hope it's true. But that also assumes that Toho does a proper and competent job of restoring and mastering the material, which we all know they have a spotty record of, at best.

I hope this bodes well for their other films. Overall I've been happy with the HD masters we've gotten of the godzilla series, but some of them are downright terrible. And at the least, all I them have some room for improvement. I'd fall out if we actually got proper, well done 4k masters of the whole series. Heck, just competent work without any glaring flaws for each film would be a dream come true!
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby lhb412 » Sun Dec 06, 2015 10:47 pm

I'm certainly happy they're taking the initiative to do this, and, like canofhumdingers said, it bodes well for the rest of the series.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Dec 02, 2016 1:57 am

Godzilla - The Soul of Japan
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby Gwangi » Fri Dec 02, 2016 12:00 pm

mr.negativity wrote:Godzilla - The Soul of Japan
phpBB [media]



I enjoyed the first couple of minutes of that video, but when he started bashing GKOTM, and rather unfairly, I thought, I had to turn against it. It is easy to play hindsight 60 years later, but one has to be in the shoes of the producers of GKOTM back in the day. Taking a Japanese monster movie and reworking it, was the first of its kind. There was no blueprint. Decisions that we will never make, had to be made by them. Sure one can disagree on how certain things were approached, but in the end, they did manage to pull it off, warts and all.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby lhb412 » Sat Dec 03, 2016 2:04 am

^ Yup, the special features for the Classic Media and Criterion releases thankfully give the KOTM version its due, even while pointing out its shortcomings. If 'Godzilla, King of the Monsters!' hadn't become a worldwide hit and made Godzilla an iconic monster would Godzilla's profile have been high enough for Toho to start thinking about reviving Godzilla for the studio's 30th anniversary? Would we even have a Godzilla series? A monster boom? Gamera and Ultraman? Probably not.

The dude who made that video would probably be content to live in a world without Ultraman, but I'm not!
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby mr.negativity » Mon Jul 31, 2017 7:09 am

A digitally remastered version of the 1954 monster classic by Ishiro Honda will be screened on Oct. 31 to mark the festival's 30th edition.
A digitally remastered version of the 1954 monster classic by Ishiro Honda will be screened on Oct. 31 to mark the festival's 30th edition.
Gavin J. Blair wrote:Tokyo International Film Festival (TIFF) will screen the original 1954 Godzilla, directed by Ishiro Honda, as one of the special events to celebrate the event's 30th edition.

The screening of the digitally remastered edition on Oct. 31 will be accompanied by the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Kaoru Wada, a student of Akira Ifukube, who scored the original soundtrack.

A talk show event before the screening at the Tokyo International Forum will feature Haruo Nakajima, the actor who wore the Godzilla suit for 12 films between 1954 and 1975, Shogo Tomiyama, who produced 12 of the iconic monster movies between 1989 and 2004, and Shinji Higuchi, co-director of Toho's reboot of the franchise last year Godzilla Resurgence (Shin-Godzilla).

Other events for the anniversary include an all-night Halloween program of films on Oct. 28 at Roppongi Hills and open air movie screenings before and during the festival.

TIFF runs from Oct. 25 to Nov. 3 at Roppongi Hills and other central Tokyo venues.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby lhb412 » Mon Sep 18, 2017 11:15 am

Apparently Rialto no longer has the US theatrical distribution rights to this movie. It's now with Janus films (who, of course, are business partners of the Criterion Collection).

http://www.janusfilms.com/films/1856

I dunno if this bodes well for further Toho genre films from Janus/Criterion, but I sure hope so!
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby klen7 » Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:11 pm

Fingers crossed for Rodan
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby jellydonut25 » Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:38 pm

I think a bunch of people might have started a few weeks ago, but I started my series re-watch this week to prep for 2019.

I'll be watching one per week, skipping the anime movies (I hate them so much, I've given parts 1 and 2 both a 0/5. I won't ever be putting myself through them again).

It's hard to say new things about this movie, but this time I just started thinking about how FEW Godzilla movies have even really honestly ATTEMPTED to tonally do what this film did.
I'd argue Mothra vs. Godzilla, Godzilla 84, and Shin Godzilla and that's it. Even GMK, which is certainly meant to be taken more seriously than say, Godzilla vs. Gigan, doesn't quite strive for this same tone, and ultimately is more concerned with splosions and monsters and even mysticism and the AWE of the destruction rather than the COST, and that's a sizable difference (not 'good' not 'bad' just DIFFERENT).

Here we have a series of 33, fairly soon to be 35 movies and only 4 of them have attempted this more serious tone, with a slant towards a more atmosphere-driven, one might even argue horror bent, despite all four of them being among the franchise's more successful (financially AND critically) outings. That's a rather odd state of affairs. Imagine if Nightmare on Elm Street had 30 entries and more of them were like part 2, which to my recollection doesn't feature ANY dream-killing, even though the more financially successful and well-liked entries were more in line with parts 1 and 3. Imagine if Bond had more entries like that David Niven Casino Royale. What a weird world.

Anyway, Gojira remains essentially a perfect movie. Obviously, it has flaws, but everything the movie sets out to do is done to perfection.
5/5. Not my favorite, but UNEQUIVOCALLY the BEST Godzilla movie. PERIOD.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby lhb412 » Wed Nov 07, 2018 1:22 am

I suppose I should start my rewatch soon... I was attempting to wait and see if Criterion would release their mythical box set ahead of King of the Monsters next year, but even if they do that'll be cutting it too close at this point.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby lhb412 » Fri Nov 09, 2018 9:33 pm

jellydonut25 wrote:It's hard to say new things about this movie, but this time I just started thinking about how FEW Godzilla movies have even really honestly ATTEMPTED to tonally do what this film did.
I'd argue Mothra vs. Godzilla, Godzilla 84, and Shin Godzilla and that's it. Even GMK, which is certainly meant to be taken more seriously than say, Godzilla vs. Gigan, doesn't quite strive for this same tone, and ultimately is more concerned with splosions and monsters and even mysticism and the AWE of the destruction rather than the COST, and that's a sizable difference (not 'good' not 'bad' just DIFFERENT).

Here we have a series of 33, fairly soon to be 35 movies and only 4 of them have attempted this more serious tone, with a slant towards a more atmosphere-driven, one might even argue horror bent, despite all four of them being among the franchise's more successful (financially AND critically) outings. That's a rather odd state of affairs. Imagine if Nightmare on Elm Street had 30 entries and more of them were like part 2, which to my recollection doesn't feature ANY dream-killing, even though the more financially successful and well-liked entries were more in line with parts 1 and 3. Imagine if Bond had more entries like that David Niven Casino Royale. What a weird world.


It is interesting that's so few Godzilla movies actually attempt this... But, I'd argue that the longevity of the Godzilla series hinges on the fact that Godzilla movies can be wildly different in plot, tone, feel, etc. During production of Godzilla 2014 Gareth Edwards said that he realized what makes a Godzilla movie a Godzilla movie is that Godzilla shows up. I know it may sound flippant, but it's actually a very astute observation on the malleability of the franchise and the character.

It's like that new Halloween film; doing all that work pulling from the original Halloween in plot, music, specific scene callbacks, and of course returning actors and continuing storyline - and if you didn't do those things it really wouldn't feel like Halloween, right? Although I enjoyed the movie it made me realize how hard it would be to make a truly great continuing series, and reminded me of just how bumpy a ride it has been for the past 40 years trying to make Halloween into a series and the various starts and stops and reboots therein. Meanwhile, you could have Godzilla show up in an otherwise completely unique science fiction or horror or fantasy or adventure film and not use any returning actors or storyline or even iconic theme music and it would still be instantly accepted as a Godzilla movie.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby Russzilla » Mon Nov 12, 2018 1:05 am

lhb412 wrote:Apparently Rialto no longer has the US theatrical distribution rights to this movie. It's now with Janus films (who, of course, are business partners of the Criterion Collection).

http://www.janusfilms.com/films/1856

I dunno if this bodes well for further Toho genre films from Janus/Criterion, but I sure hope so!

Just as an aside, every english subtitled Godzilla movie that has aired on IFC so far these past couple weeks or so has Janus films in front of it.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby jellydonut25 » Mon Nov 12, 2018 9:40 am

lhb412 wrote:
jellydonut25 wrote:It's hard to say new things about this movie, but this time I just started thinking about how FEW Godzilla movies have even really honestly ATTEMPTED to tonally do what this film did.
I'd argue Mothra vs. Godzilla, Godzilla 84, and Shin Godzilla and that's it. Even GMK, which is certainly meant to be taken more seriously than say, Godzilla vs. Gigan, doesn't quite strive for this same tone, and ultimately is more concerned with splosions and monsters and even mysticism and the AWE of the destruction rather than the COST, and that's a sizable difference (not 'good' not 'bad' just DIFFERENT).

Here we have a series of 33, fairly soon to be 35 movies and only 4 of them have attempted this more serious tone, with a slant towards a more atmosphere-driven, one might even argue horror bent, despite all four of them being among the franchise's more successful (financially AND critically) outings. That's a rather odd state of affairs. Imagine if Nightmare on Elm Street had 30 entries and more of them were like part 2, which to my recollection doesn't feature ANY dream-killing, even though the more financially successful and well-liked entries were more in line with parts 1 and 3. Imagine if Bond had more entries like that David Niven Casino Royale. What a weird world.


It is interesting that's so few Godzilla movies actually attempt this... But, I'd argue that the longevity of the Godzilla series hinges on the fact that Godzilla movies can be wildly different in plot, tone, feel, etc. During production of Godzilla 2014 Gareth Edwards said that he realized what makes a Godzilla movie a Godzilla movie is that Godzilla shows up. I know it may sound flippant, but it's actually a very astute observation on the malleability of the franchise and the character.

It's like that new Halloween film; doing all that work pulling from the original Halloween in plot, music, specific scene callbacks, and of course returning actors and continuing storyline - and if you didn't do those things it really wouldn't feel like Halloween, right? Although I enjoyed the movie it made me realize how hard it would be to make a truly great continuing series, and reminded me of just how bumpy a ride it has been for the past 40 years trying to make Halloween into a series and the various starts and stops and reboots therein. Meanwhile, you could have Godzilla show up in an otherwise completely unique science fiction or horror or fantasy or adventure film and not use any returning actors or storyline or even iconic theme music and it would still be instantly accepted as a Godzilla movie.

I basically agree, though I'd almost argue that there is something of a formula, or a feel, and it skews more science-fiction and/or action and/or adventure for Godzilla, and pretty far away from the (essentially) horror tone of Gojira.

KOTM56 feels more like a Godzilla movie than Gojira, in a way.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby lhb412 » Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:34 am

With the release of The Planet Eater I finally started my rewatch in preparation for this summer's Godzilla Epic!

It's interesting how affecting the destruction of Tokyo is in this movie. It just carries on for so long. The tactile joy of seeing the miniature city being destroyed is in effect at the beginning, at least. Even with this film being basically the first time something like this was done - the joy was there even at the start, but... then it just keeps going on and on and on. More people are crushed. More buildings are set on fire. You see more long-distance shots of people watching the destruction happen in the background and it just mounts until the horror really starts to get to you.
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Re: TALKBACK #1: Gojira

Postby Gojizilla » Thu Sep 05, 2019 6:48 pm

Don't watch this and Shin Gojira back to back. It will ruin every other Godzilla movie because of how damn good they are.
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