Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North Ameri

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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Dr Kain » Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:14 pm

H-Man wrote:I'm not going to go into Ultraman's video quality because it's been discussed quite a bit here already. Simply re-read any critical posts from the last several pages.

As I said, if that's all fine with you, cool. You don't have to understand my position, and to be frank I'm sure you won't, but I ask you don't disrespect it.


But you are not making any sense. You keep saying it has no grain, which is totally false as there is grain present, you say the image look soft, but they are are completely detailed and clean, so you never explained what you are comparing the video quality too. It's been proven time and again that these are the same transfers they have had in Japan for the last several years and I never once heard anyone complain about them then. You would think people would be more upset about them when they are dropping $300+ on them than they are at $20. So what exactly is your go to image when talking about Ultraman because I don't see anyone posting a superior looking video quality for this series.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Dr Kain » Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:24 pm

Jinzo Ningen wrote:My principle objection to this set is the pitiful level of INattention to DETAIL. You tout the awesomeness of the booklet. Here are 2 examples of said awesomeness:

"ULTRA PSYCHIC By rapidly spinning his body, Ultraman releases multifold beam rings toward the enemy and incapacitates its movements by puts it in a straitjacket.


Okay, for that, you are right, but they clearly meant putting instead of puts.

CATCH RING It is executed by converting the energy used for attack into defensing. Ultraman generates the energy by moving both hands horizontally over its head, and created a barrier of light by lowering them down."


I don't see the issue here. It tells exactly what it does. Could they have worded it better? Sure, but it gets to the point.

With regards to the subtitles, there are multiple spelling errors that I caught in episode 6 (as far as I've gotten to date), in which 'monster' is misspelled as 'mosnter' - not once or twice, but several times.


Okay, that part is bad, though if that is the worst thing to come out of the subtitles, then whatever. I've seen more professional companies do worse.

These kinds of mistakes are something that could and SHOULD have been caught by those in charge of proofreading everything over at Mill Creek before it was finalized. For chrissake, computers have built-in programs that automatically spellcheck to find spelling & grammatical errors!!! - but these were either turned off, or said goofs were duly noted & ignored.


I guess I have watched enough shows subbed that I don't even care anymore at this point. Bandai had a ton of subtitles issues with many of their Gundam releases and they were a company 50 times bigger than Mill Creek. Funimation has it happen too. If the big companies can get away with doing it, why shouldn't the small companies that have little to no teams working on them get away with it to? All they need to do is learn from this experience and try to do better next time.

Then again, considering how the Ultra shows on Crunchyroll were full of errors in the subs, as are the subs on The Next DVD, this might not even be Mill Creek's doing, but Tsuburaya's. I guess we'll have to wait to know for sure when Nexus comes out to see if they actually have an episode title that is just "???."

I don't HATE this release. I just wish it had gone through a few more inspection & clean-up passes before it went to print.


My mistake then. I totally misread your post in my head then.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Benjamin Haines » Sun Oct 20, 2019 12:00 am

I don't like the fact that the audio tracks were remixed with more modern sound effects. Since that's exactly how TPC has presented these shows on BRD in Japan, though, it seems unavoidable for these North American releases. Why would TPC do that?
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby SeaHawk » Sun Oct 20, 2019 12:13 am

The whole audiovisual presentation of Ultraman as supplied by TPC is just an abomination. It's like they wanted it to look and sound like a modern, shot-on-video series.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby lhb412 » Sun Oct 20, 2019 12:32 am

I'm very happy with these first two releases. Ultraman isn't perfect, but it's far superior to what's come before and, although your mileage may vary, the fact that it is an actual, official release feels like such a big moral victory.

That being said, if in a few years Tsuburaya Productions turns out a superior remaster of the 1966 series and makes it available to Mill Creek I'd be down for that, too! And hearing what Keith Aiken said on that podcast about trying to hunt down the original American dubs of not just Ultraman, but possibly Ultra Q and Ultraseven? I'd buy a 'just the dubs' set as well, if that became a thing.

Can't wait for further releases!
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Garasharp K7 » Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:07 am

Benjamin Haines wrote:I don't like the fact that the audio tracks were remixed with more modern sound effects. Since that's exactly how TPC has presented these shows on BRD in Japan, though, it seems unavoidable for these North American releases. Why would TPC do that?


On the Japanese BDs (and the previous DVDs) those effects were created for an optional 5.1 mix for some episodes, but not all of them. Offhand, i don't know which episodes used the effects, but watching the colorized Ultra Q DVDs recently I noticed that the 'Mammoth Flower' episode had the optional 5.1 track. Same goes for the Ultraman and Ultraseven Blu rays too. Ep. 2 of Ultraman had the added effects, and ep.15 of Ultraseven used 'em as well.

Just had a quick look at that episode on Shout's Ultraseven dvd set, and those effects are on there too. They definitely stand out in the scene where King Joe splits into its' component parts. I didn't know those were the remixed effects until I watched the Japanese BD.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Jinzo Ningen » Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:25 am

lhb412 wrote:I'm very happy with these first two releases. Ultraman isn't perfect, but it's far superior to what's come before and, although your mileage may vary, the fact that it is an actual, official release feels like such a big moral victory.

That being said, if in a few years Tsuburaya Productions turns out a superior remaster of the 1966 series and makes it available to Mill Creek I'd be down for that, too! And hearing what Keith Aiken said on that podcast about trying to hunt down the original American dubs of not just Ultraman, but possibly Ultra Q and Ultraseven? I'd buy a 'just the dubs' set as well, if that became a thing.

Can't wait for further releases!


This, x Infinity.

I've purchased & re-purchsed so many TV series and movies multiple times over the years (format changes, upgrades, special editions, etc., etc., etc.) that one more run-thru won't bother me if it's a worthwhile, justifiable expenditure. In fact, I'd pay DOUBLE (you hear that, Mill Creek!?!) DOUBLE what this set cost IF it had the American dub, cleaned up & properly synched.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby lhb412 » Sun Oct 20, 2019 1:48 pm

^ How cool would it be if they manage to find a true 'lost dub' in Ultra Q?! Or more Hawaiin Ultraseven episodes?
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby RobD » Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:28 pm

Having watched a few Ultra Q episodes: amazing HD restoration by Tsuburaya there. It's a great release.

Ultraman-no doubt the best picture we've ever gotten and OFFICIAL. That being said, there is very pronounced "digital noise" on many of the characters or scenes that
can be jarring at times. Perhaps it's watching it through a 4k/hdr television instead of a 1080p tv that's making the noise more pronounced. I've tinkered a bit with my
television settings and certain modes like "natural" or "movie" seem to make the picture more clear but I prefer my "dynamic" setting with maximum color and
contrast on.

Apparently Tsuburaya is in the midst of mastering Ultra Q in 4k and hopefully Ultraman will follow which would help clear up the noise. Don't get me wrong, I LOVE
that we finally have official Ultra blu-rays in North America as it was a long time in coming. However, I do think Tsuburaya has plenty of room to give us a "Remaster 2.0"
for the original series in 4k.

Mill Creek has done a great job with the license so far IMO. They just didn't throw the discs in a cheap plain blu ray case and call it a day. They went the extra mile
to give us the best presentation I think they could while keeping the price very reasonable.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby H-Man » Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:50 pm

Dr Kain wrote:
H-Man wrote:I'm not going to go into Ultraman's video quality because it's been discussed quite a bit here already. Simply re-read any critical posts from the last several pages.

As I said, if that's all fine with you, cool. You don't have to understand my position, and to be frank I'm sure you won't, but I ask you don't disrespect it.


But you are not making any sense. You keep saying it has no grain, which is totally false as there is grain present, you say the image look soft, but they are are completely detailed and clean, so you never explained what you are comparing the video quality too. It's been proven time and again that these are the same transfers they have had in Japan for the last several years and I never once heard anyone complain about them then. You would think people would be more upset about them when they are dropping $300+ on them than they are at $20. So what exactly is your go to image when talking about Ultraman because I don't see anyone posting a superior looking video quality for this series.


I don't need to see another transfer of the show to know what film should or can look like. This is not representative of film. Look at the attached link below. I don't see grain but I do see a great deal of digital noise, and I also see where some of that noise has been removed, leaving smeary textures and macroblocking. Look at Yoshio Tsuchiya and Fuji's faces: there is no definition. Look at the left side of the wall to the left of him: clear macroblocking. Plus all the haloing: Fuji's eyebrows are blue (!), Mura's outline is plagued with halos. This is a disgusting look whether you're spending $20 or $300.

https://i2.wp.com/www.doblu.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/ultraman2019-10-11-23h45m15s618.png?ssl=1

In general, 16mm does have a much softer look when compared to 35mm, but what you're seeing in Ultraman is not representative of 16mm film. Compare this screenshot from The Corpse Grinders here. I chose this title for a specific reason, that being it dates to approximately the same era ('72, vs. UM in 1966), but as an exploitation movie was probably photographed on cheaper film stock. Bear in mind too that the cinematographer may not have been as experienced as those working for Tsuburaya, resulting in a sorta blurry image. Also, it was shot flat but was presented here in a widescreen image. In other words, as would have been the case theatrically, the frame is blown up and the top/bottom is matted out, so naturally a widescreen presentation of 16mm should be inherently less-detailed than a full frame image, as Ultraman is.

Anyway - my point is this. Look at the grain structure. It's consistent through the entire frame, not just in splotches where the studio didn’t crush all the detail with digital noise reduction. Even on the man's face there's consistent and definite grain and not a smeary flat texture like the UM transfer. There is considerably less haloing here. In fact, there's almost none. This transfer isn't even the best you can get from 16mm, but it's a hell of a lot closer to film than the Ultraman transfer is.

Sometimes it's not about having another version to compare to; it's about having standards for what represents decent video (and audio) quality, and I'm sorry, but this release does not meet them. And yes, I fully understand that's not Mill Creek's fault.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby SeaHawk » Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:22 pm

That's not even grain. It looks like blocking of some kind, like the Simitar Godzilla DVDs.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Dr Kain » Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:49 pm

H-Man wrote:I don't need to see another transfer of the show to know what film should or can look like. This is not representative of film. Look at the attached link below. I don't see grain but I do see a great deal of digital noise, and I also see where some of that noise has been removed, leaving smeary textures and macroblocking. Look at Yoshio Tsuchiya and Fuji's faces: there is no definition. Look at the left side of the wall to the left of him: clear macroblocking. Plus all the haloing: Fuji's eyebrows are blue (!), Mura's outline is plagued with halos. This is a disgusting look whether you're spending $20 or $300.

https://i2.wp.com/www.doblu.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/ultraman2019-10-11-23h45m15s618.png?ssl=1


I see the macroblocking in the center of Marumatsa's and the other dude's head, but that's it. I don't see any halos and the eye brows are definitely not blue.

Sometimes it's not about having another version to compare to; it's about having standards for what represents decent video (and audio) quality, and I'm sorry, but this release does not meet them. And yes, I fully understand that's not Mill Creek's fault.


I guess my standards for Japanese material from the 60s is different than yours then. That's all there is to it. I will never expect anything from Japan to look as good as something from America.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby H-Man » Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:11 pm

Dr Kain wrote:


I see the macroblocking in the center of Marumatsa's and the other dude's head, but that's it. I don't see any halos and the eye brows are definitely not blue.


Look at the blue haloing above her left (your right) eyebrow. I can't help it if you don't see all the blue noise around Mura's head, around Tsuchiya's head, etc.

Sometimes it's not about having another version to compare to; it's about having standards for what represents decent video (and audio) quality, and I'm sorry, but this release does not meet them. And yes, I fully understand that's not Mill Creek's fault.


I guess my standards for Japanese material from the 60s is different than yours then. That's all there is to it. I will never expect anything from Japan to look as good as something from America.


I guess so, but to be frank, I think that's a misinformed belief to hold. From a general technical standpoint there's no reason why Toho's genre films, for example, should inherently look worse because they aren't American. :? As far as video goes, Toho's recent HD transfers have been very good.

Image

Image

Maybe you're just used to really bad Japanese HD transfers and as such your standards are low. I mean, what about Ultra Q? Is that considerably worse than "something from America"? I posit that Q's transfer shouldn't be an outlier, it should be the norm. And in many cases, Japanese companies seem to be getting better with modern HD transfers.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Tom R VanSlambrouck » Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:32 pm

I finished off Ultra Q which was my first time going through the entire series. Overall I thought it was a decent show but I prefer Ultraman to Ultra Q, Ultra Q is still an amazing show.

There's only two episodes I really didn't care for and that's Goro and Goro and the final episode I also didn't care for. Some episodes I didn't think I'd like, like Metamorphisis I actually really enjoyed. Probably hold off on Ultraman for a bit.

As for the digital noise reduction I did notice it quite a bit in later episodes where there where no details on the actors faces but that could be because I use my Xbox One X for my main BD player and I left the TV on the Game mode setting which I have calibrated differently from when I normally watch movies. The updated sound effects where really annoying though. Even though I hadn't heard the original track I could tell when updated Sound Effects where used. In all honesty though the DNR isn't as bad as what some images make it out to be.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Dr Kain » Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:24 am

H-Man wrote:Look at the blue haloing above her left (your right) eyebrow. I can't help it if you don't see all the blue noise around Mura's head, around Tsuchiya's head, etc.


I'm sorry, I just don't see it.

From a general technical standpoint there's no reason why Toho's genre films, for example, should inherently look worse because they aren't American.


Lower budgets from the original films, lesser quality film stock, not having the money and top of the line equipment that allows the movies to be remastered properly, etc.

As far as video goes, Toho's recent HD transfers have been very good.

Image

Image


They're good, but what's with the blue tint over the image? The same thing was going on with the Astro-Monster image I was talking about in the other thread.

Maybe you're just used to really bad Japanese HD transfers and as such your standards are low. I mean, what about Ultra Q? Is that considerably worse than "something from America"? I posit that Q's transfer shouldn't be an outlier, it should be the norm. And in many cases, Japanese companies seem to be getting better with modern HD transfers.


Ultra Q looked fantastic, but still had a ton of print damage in various scenes, especially Mammoth Flower. However, half of that is because the show was done on 35mm and the other half is because Tsuburaya had that specialized top of the line printer that was out at the time (which only one other company in the world used).
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby SeaHawk » Mon Oct 21, 2019 11:58 pm

Dr. Kain, you are so demonstrably mistaken it's not even funny. Toho was using IDENTICAL FILM STOCKS to US film companies. So were the other Japanese majors, for the most part. So was most of the world. This has been mentioned in this thread already. Major Japanese theatrical films and US theatrical films of the '60s are equals, as far as film origination is concerned. Japanese companies had an option between Eastman color and the indigenous Fujicolor... independent producers tended to choose Fuji because it was cheaper... I could cite an academic thesis that proves this. The majors always went with Eastman, but starting in the late '60s some of them started going for Fuji, probably because the stock had improved in quality and adopted the same chemistry as Eastman, meaning it could be processed in the same bath as Eastman and that it was probably indistinguishable in quality from Eastman.

Every Toho kaiju movie of the '60s was shot on Eastman Kodak film. This isn't even a secret or obscure information, it's on the posters. And Toho DOES have access to better elements for their films and better scanners, and they could surely afford to restore everything properly and in short order... they're a freaking huge media company and real estate giant. They just won't go to the trouble with any film besides Godzilla '54 and King Kong vs. Godzilla.

Yes, it's true, Space Amoeba and Secret of the Telegian are strangely missing Toho's characteristic brown filter, so their properly balanced color does seem cooler by comparison. That doesn't mean there is a blue tint.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Dr Kain » Tue Oct 22, 2019 12:14 am

SeaHawk wrote:Dr. Kain, you are so demonstrably mistaken it's not even funny. Toho was using IDENTICAL FILM STOCKS to US film companies. So were all the other Japanese majors. So was most of the world. This has been in this thread already. Major Japanese theatrical films and US theatrical films of the '60s are equals, as far as film origination is concerned. Japanese companies had an option between Eastman color and the indigenous Fujicolor... independent producers tended to choose Fuji because it was cheaper... I could cite an academic thesis that proves this. The majors always went with Eastman. Every Toho kaiju movie of the '60s was shot on Eastman Kodak film. This isn't even a secret or obscure information, it's on the posters. And Toho DOES have access to better elements for their films and better scanners, and they could surely afford to restore everything properly and in short order... they're a freaking huge media company and real estate giant. They just won't go to the trouble with any film besides Godzilla '54 and King Kong vs. Godzilla.

Yes, it's true, Space Amoeba and Secret of the Telegian are strangely missing Toho's characteristic brown filter, so their properly balanced color does seem cooler by comparison. That doesn't mean there is a blue tint.


No offense, but I have no idea what you are talking about. Eastman or Fuji means nothing to me. I just know that I had read many years ago that they were using the best filmstock available to them, but it was still inferior compared to what Hollywood was using.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby H-Man » Tue Oct 22, 2019 12:17 am

Dr Kain wrote:No offense, but I have no idea what you are talking about. Eastman or Fuji means nothing to me. I just know that I had read many years ago that they were using the best filmstock available to them, but it was still inferior compared to what Hollywood was using.


What you read is mistaken, as the guy just said, lol.

SeaHawk wrote:Yes, it's true, Space Amoeba and Telegian are strangely missing Toho's characteristic brown filter, so their properly balanced color does seem cooler by comparison. That doesn't mean there is a blue tint.


:lol:

Telegian is actually pretty warm, but that's because Toho's films from that era used warmer colors in clothing, sets, etc. The screencap I shared is of a shot that's not really representative of the general look of that film. I just picked that one cause it looks nice and it's a cool shot.

Edit: More random Telegian screenshots to dispel this "blue tint" nonsense. https://postimg.cc/gallery/1c8n8wpdu/

Also, yay, Toho transfers without crushed blacks.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby SeaHawk » Tue Oct 22, 2019 12:54 am

No offense, but I have no idea what you are talking about. Eastman or Fuji means nothing to me. I just know that I had read many years ago that they were using the best filmstock available to them, but it was still inferior compared to what Hollywood was using.


Well if you understood what I was talking about, then you'd realize whatever you read doesn't make any sense. The Japanese film industry adopted American-made Eastman color on a mass scale. There was nothing different about the Eastman color they imported, or the way they processed it, or they way they shot it. If anything, it was both used and processed to an extremely high quality.

From the Japan Motion Picture Almanac 1957, via Jasper Sharp's excellent thesis, Japanese Widescreen Cinema:

Although it lagged behind foreign nations largely in starting the color film production, Japan surpassed advanced nations in coloring technique and its products are being received well abroad for their beautiful shades. This is ascribed principally to the superiority of photography, advanced technique of developing and exhaustive research work prior to starting the color film production. Another factor which cannot be overlooked is that Japanese since olden times have been keen in color sense and their clothing, fixtures and paraphernalia are all fit for color photography.


Jasper adds, referring to the above quotation:

This quote is pertinent not so much with regards to the qualities of Japan’s own domestically-developed stocks, because at the time of writing Eastmancolor was the favoured process for Japanese producers.


He later writes:

From Japan’s first such production, Gate of Hell (1953), development of Eastmancolor was undertaken by the Toyo Laboratories (Tôyô Genzôjo) plant in Gotanda, Tokyo. This was originally established in 1942 as the Far East Laboratory (Kyokutô Genzôjo), and renamed in 1942 (it was renamed once more in 1986 as IMAGICA). In 1955, it expanded to a second plant in Kyoto, not only due to the rising number of domestic colour productions (from this year the company began processing other stocks as well as Eastmancolor), but also because of ‘orders flowing in from Southeast Asian nations.’ This highlights Japan’s prominent technological position among the region’s motion picture industries.


As has been detailed, in the 1950s, the country played a central role within Southeast Asian film production. Nagata Masaichi was a key driver of the establishment of the first film festival in the region, a number of international co-productions were initiated by Japanese companies, colour film from other Asian producers was processed at Tokyo’s Far East Laboratory, and Japanese ’scope technologies formed the basis of the systems adopted by industries in countries such as Hong Kong.


Japan's film industry was technologically dominant in the region during the '50s and '60s. I don't see why it is hard to believe that Japanese films - color ones, specifically - weren't produced to extremely high quality standards... just take a look at films like Gate of Hell, or The Mysterians, or even a good copy of War of the Gargantuas. Japan was one of the only choices for processing color in the region, and by far the best choice.

As for the use of Eastmancolor and the cheaper Fujicolor throughout the '60s... I was mistaken, there isn't much data on what stocks independent producers were using in the '60s, but it is known that Daiei and Nikkatsu resorted to it when they got into financial difficulties, and that Toei used it on a lot of their cheap programmers. No color stock was cheap, but Fujicolor was comparatively cheaper.

Against the decline of Agfacolor and the predominance of Eastmancolor in the early 1960s, from the middle of the decade Fujicolor begins to make a reappearance, mainly in the films of Nikkatsu and, for the first time, Daiei. Nevertheless, all listed releases by Toho, Toei, Shochiku use Eastmancolor, a trend that remains throughout 1968 and 1969. For Nikkatsu and Daiei, the division between Fujicolor and Eastmancolor is about equal by 1967. By 1969, most of Daiei’s releases and virtually all of Nikkatsu films and are listed as Fujicolor, with Nikkatsu’s one exception in Eastmancolor, The Wild Sea (Arai umi, Yamazaki Tokujirô, 1969), a drama about two brothers who work as whalers, produced by an independent company, Shinjû-sha, and only distributed by the larger studio.

In 1970, all of Daiei’s listed releases are in Fujicolor. In June of this year, Daiei and Nikkatsu integrated their distribution network as Dainichi Film Distribution (Dainichi Eihai). Nevertheless, the arrangement was dissolved in August 1971 with the withdrawal of Nikkatsu from the partnership. On 20 November 1971, Nikkatsu dramatically changed its strategy, devoting its resources almost exclusively to the production of erotic films marketed under the Roman Porno banner, while just over a week later, on 29 November, Daiei declared itself bankrupt.

The early adoption of Fujicolor by Shintoho, its use by Toei for its programme pictures, and its increased use by Nikkatsu and Daiei during a period when both companies were facing financial difficulties in the latter half of the decade strongly suggest that the domestic stock offered significant cost advantages over Eastmancolor, and that further improvements had been made to the stock at some point during the 1960s.


It is also the case that a significant number of Toei productions from the 1960s that are not listed in the UniJapan catalogues used Fujicolor, as can be ascertained in the opening titles of a random selection of films falling within the low-budget programme picture category. Fujicolor, with its slight cyan tinge, provided a vital part of the aesthetic of such films as the various entries in the nine-part Tales of Showa Era Chivalry series of yakuza films (Shôwa zankyô-den, Saeki Kiyoshi, Makino Masahiro and Yamashita Kôsaku, 1965-1972), Snake Woman’s Curse (Kaidan: Hebi onna, Nakagawa Nobuo, 1968) and Horrors of Malformed Men (Kyôfu kikei ningen, Ishii Teruo, 1969), Again, this highlights the limitations of exclusively relying on the UniJapan catalogues.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby kiryugoji04 » Wed Oct 23, 2019 1:21 am

Seahawk, that's a lot of work you're doing there to just have it all effortlessly refuted by that thing that Kain maybe read that one time at some point in the distant past. I just don't think you can compete with that kind of conviction.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby lhb412 » Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:09 am

With films like Texas Chain Saw Massacre that were filmed in 16mm then blown up to 35mm for distribution what elements are people working from to do the HD restoration?
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Joseph Goodman » Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:25 am

The most recent restoration of TCM used the 16mm Ektachrome camera original.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Dr Kain » Wed Oct 23, 2019 10:32 am

kiryugoji04 wrote:Seahawk, that's a lot of work you're doing there to just have it all effortlessly refuted by that thing that Kain maybe read that one time at some point in the distant past. I just don't think you can compete with that kind of conviction.


I read it and I find it interesting. That's good to know that they can indeed do better remasters, but for now, I'm not going to get all upset over the transfers we are getting from either Mill Creek or Criterion. It would be great if they were better, but it is what it is. It's not like these will be the last time I ever end up buying these movies/series again. There will always be better editions down the line.
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby lhb412 » Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:14 am

Joseph Goodman wrote:The most recent restoration of TCM used the 16mm Ektachrome camera original.


Groovy
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Re: Ultraman TV and Movie Licensed to Mill Creek for North A

Postby Jinzo Ningen » Wed Oct 23, 2019 1:55 pm

Dr Kain wrote:That's good to know that they can indeed do better remasters, but for now, I'm not going to get all upset over the transfers we are getting from either Mill Creek or Criterion. It would be great if they were better, but it is what it is. It's not like these will be the last time I ever end up buying these movies/series again. There will always be better editions down the line.


The biggest problem with that mindset is that a lot, in fact perhaps the majority, of Blu-ray consumers out there are not die-hard fans. As such, one time is all they're likely to buy something. With that in mind, even IF the folks at Mill Creek were to release a 2.0 version of Ultraman within a year or so that DID HAVE flawlessly cleaned up American dubs and REAMS of extra footage, interviews, and what have you, the fact is that this would be of relative interest for a small group of hardcore fans only - like us. But by and large the rest of the folks who have already picked up this BR set either won't bother buying ANOTHER edition of it... or will do so begrudgingly, upset that they had to purchase something twice to get what they feel should have been included the first time around, which would likely engender negative feelings towards Mill Creek & any future Ultra series releases.

Rabid fanboys like us will buy multiple editions of most anything genre-related if it's in some cool new packaging, has 30 seconds of "previously unreleased footage" etc., etc. But that obsession (stupidity? :lol: ) does NOT reflect the buying habits of the majority of consumers. :lol:
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