Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

King Kong! Star Trek! The Lord of the Rings! Hellraiser! Star Wars! The Marvel Cinematic Universe! The Universal Monsters! Freddy and Jason! The Dead Trilogy! The DC Cinematic Universe! Battlestar Galactica! Hammer Films! Gorgo! The range of Western Sci-Fi, Horror, and Fantasy Movies and Television programs span the scope of the imagination; this is the forum to discuss them!

"Come get some..."

Moderator: Controllers

Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Thu May 09, 2019 2:30 pm

STAR WARS FEBRUARY 6, 2018:
GAME OF THRONES CREATORS DAVID BENIOFF AND D.B. WEISS TO WRITE AND PRODUCE A NEW SERIES OF STAR WARS FILMS
David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are going from Winterfell to a galaxy far, far away.

It was announced today that Benioff and Weiss, creators of the smash-hit, Emmy Award-winning television series Game of Thrones, will write and produce a new series of Star Wars films.

These new films will be separate from both the episodic Skywalker saga and the recently-announced trilogy being developed by Rian Johnson, writer-director of Star Wars: The Last Jedi.

“David and Dan are some of the best storytellers working today,” said Kathleen Kennedy, president of Lucasfilm. “Their command of complex characters, depth of story and richness of mythology will break new ground and boldly push Star Wars in ways I find incredibly exciting.”

“In the summer of 1977 we traveled to a galaxy far, far away, and we’ve been dreaming of it ever since,” Benioff and Weiss said in a joint statement. “We are honored by the opportunity, a little terrified by the responsibility, and so excited to get started as soon as the final season of Game of Thrones is complete.”

No release dates have been set for the new films, and there have (thankfully) been no sightings of White Walkers around Lucasfilm.



Deadline February 6, 2018:
‘Game Of Thrones’ Duo Benioff & Weiss To Pilot New ‘Star Wars’ Movie Series
Patrick Hipes wrote:On Disney’s first-quarter earnings call after the Benioff-Weiss news went public, chairman and CEO Bob Iger was asked why the pair weren’t doing a Star Wars-centered series (like the one being developed for Disney’s new OTT service). “Their interest was in creating Star Wars films,” Iger responded. “We’ve been talking with them for some time. They didn’t express interest in a series.” He added that the pair was focused on “a particular point in time in the Star Wars franchise” with the new movies.



THR 9/20/2018:
Bob Iger Talks on Disney's Streaming Service, 'Roseanne,' James Gunn and a Coming ‘Star Wars' “Slowdown”
Matt Belloni wrote:Many believe Disney should pump the breaks and not put out a Star Wars movie each year.

I made the timing decision, and as I look back, I think the mistake that I made — I take the blame — was a little too much, too fast. You can expect some slowdown, but that doesn't mean we're not gonna make films. J.J. [Abrams] is busy making [Episode] IX. We have creative entities, including [Game of Thrones creators David] Benioff and [D.B.] Weiss, who are developing sagas of their own, which we haven't been specific about. And we are just at the point where we're gonna start making decisions about what comes next after J.J.'s. But I think we're gonna be a little bit more careful about volume and timing. And the buck stops here on that.


/film February 11th, 2019:
New ‘Star Wars’ Film Series from ‘Game of Thrones’ Creators Seems to Be a Trilogy

STAR WARS NEWS NET MARCH 19TH, 2019:
RUMOR: BENIOFF AND WEISS’ FIRST STAR WARS FILM SET WELL BEFORE THE SKYWALKERS TO BEGIN FILMING THIS FALL


THR MAY 07, 2019:
Three New 'Star Wars' Films Get Release Dates in Disney Schedule Reset
Mia Galuppo & Aaron Couch wrote:In a major overhaul, Disney has updated the studio's and Fox's theatrical release schedules.

As a part of that shake-up, multiple Fox and Disney titles have been rescheduled, unscheduled and revealed, including three untitled Star Wars movies.

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker will conclude the nine-picture saga that began with the original 1977 film, while what comes next has been a mystery. Disney has dated three untitled Star Wars films, the first hint of the franchise's big-screen future. They are set for Dec. 16, 2022; Dec. 20, 2024; and Dec. 18, 2026.

While it is unclear what the new untitled Star Wars films will tackle, it is known that The Last Jedi filmmaker Rian Johnson is developing a trilogy, while Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are penning their own trilogy.

There's been at least one Star Wars film every year since 2015's The Force Awakens, but Disney has indicated it would take a big-screen breather after Rise of Skywalker, as Lucasfilm is focusing on series for the upcoming Disney+ streaming service. Projects including Jon Favreau's The Mandalorian and an untitled Diego Luna-led Rogue One prequel. At Star Wars Celebration last month in Chicago, Lucasfilm head Kathleen Kennedy told The Hollywood Reporter she was plotting out the future of Star Wars on the big screen in consultation with Johnson, Benioff, Weiss and Favreau.

"We are looking at the next saga. We are not just looking at another trilogy, we're really looking at the next 10 years or more," Kennedy said.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Tue May 14, 2019 2:15 pm

io9 5/14/2019:
It's Official: The First Star Wars Film After Rise of Skywalker Will Be From Game of Thrones' Showrunners
Beth Elderkin wrote:We’re going from Westeros to a galaxy far, far away. While speaking at the MoffetNathanson Media & Communications summit today, Walt Disney Company chairman Bob Iger confirmed that the next Star Wars film following The Rise of Skywalker will be from Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, coming in 2022.

“We did a deal with David Benioff and D.B Weiss, who are famous for Game of Thrones, and the next movie that we release will be theirs,” Iger said. “And we’re not saying anything more about that.”

During the summit, Iger discussed the future of the Star Wars franchise in both film and television. Currently, two Star Wars shows are in the works for the new streaming platform, Disney+, but the company is planning on waiting three years between the release of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker and the next Star Wars film from Benioff and Weiss. Iger said the break was a deliberate choice on the part of the company, following the latest trilogy and two spinoff films, Solo and Rogue One.

“[We thought] it would be smart for us to take a bit of a hiatus while we figure out what’s next. Now, we’re not going to wait until [The Rise of Skywalker] is released and start figuring it out, we’re actually hard at work doing that already,” he said. “The conclusion that we reached was that three years was the proper amount of time to not only take a breather and reset, but to really gear up for the next film’s release.”

Last year, Disney announced that Benioff and Weiss would be writing and producing a new Star Wars series, which would be separate from the Skywalker saga. During his discussion, Iger only discussed the “next movie,” not a possible trilogy or series, so it’s unclear whether Benioff and Weiss are still working on a series, if they’re only doing one film, or if there will be another standalone film in between. This also leaves the future of Rian Johnson’s planned Star Wars trilogy uncertain, as we still haven’t heard when (or if) the first film in that previously announced series will debut.

Then, there’s the concern about how Benioff and Weiss will handle a Star Wars film or series, given the rising criticism about the final season of Game of Thrones—much of it centering around the writing and pace. The pair was also criticized after HBO announced they were starting a new series called Confederate, an alt-history saga that would explore life had the South had won the American Civil War. The project has been delayed, and its future is up in the air.

Benioff and Weiss’ Star Wars film is set to come out in 2022, with two more Star Wars film coming every other year through 2026. They’re set to alternate with James Cameron’s planned Avatar sequels, which start in 2021 and are expected to continue every other year through 2027.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Untitled Star Wars Project 1 (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Tue May 14, 2019 3:45 pm

Deadline May 14, 2019:
‘Star Wars’ Film Future: Disney’s Bob Iger Confirms ‘Game Of Thrones’ Duo Helming Next Feature Outing After A “Hiatus”

THR MAY 14, 2019:
'Star Wars' and the Mystery Behind Its Next Era
Graeme McMillan wrote:Now it’s official: D.B. Weiss and David Benioff are working on the 2022 Star Wars movie, the first to follow this December’s Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, Disney CEO Bob Iger confirmed Tuesday morning.

That Benioff and Weiss are behind the 2022 release shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise; the pair — currently under intense critical scrutiny as Game of Thrones crashes towards conclusion on HBO — were announced as working on a new trilogy of Star Wars movies last year, and just last month, were identified by Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy as being part of discussions over the next decade’s worth of Star Wars stories. As soon as three new Star Wars movies were placed on the schedule, it was either going to be Benioff and Weiss or Rian Johnson at the helm.

Johnson, after all, was announced as being responsible for his own Star Wars trilogy even before Star Wars: The Last Jedi was released. The three new Star Wars dates announced May 7 are for Dec. 16, 2022; Dec. 20, 2024; and Dec. 18, 2026. It's unclear if Benioff and Weiss' trilogy will fill those dates, as Iger just confirmed they will be making the 2022 film.

It’s possible that the Benioff and Weiss trilogy is getting off the ground first for purely logistical reasons; their schedules might be more clear with Game of Thrones’ finale airing on Sunday. By comparison, Johnson’s Knives Out isn’t released until November, with promotional duties meaning that he wouldn’t be able to devote himself entirely to Star Wars until early 2020, most likely — but with the next Star Wars not due for three years after Rise of Skywalker, perhaps there’s something more than scheduling at play here.

The placement of Benioff and Weiss as the first Star Wars project of what could be considered a new era — the first movie post-Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, which closes out the story that George Lucas started 40-plus years ago — could be seen as a statement on behalf of Lucasfilm in multiple ways, in that case.

Rian Johnson, at least, is somewhat of a known quantity when it comes to Star Wars, as needlessly controversial as The Last Jedi may have become inside the fandom; Benioff and Weiss, on the other hand, aren’t. Audiences might know them from Game of Thrones, but they’ve also worked on The Kite Runner, Troy and even X-Men Origins: Wolverine. Who really knows what kind of Star Wars they’ll come up with?

With what we’ll call Untitled Star Wars Project 1 now known as the first in a new trilogy from creators who haven’t previously worked on the property, or even created anything in the Space Opera vein at all — no, dragons and high fantasy don’t really count — Lucasfilm is underscoring just how unknown the future of Star Wars actually is, after this December: When in the larger mythology will the new movie be set? What kind of story will it tell, with what kind of tone? How, even, are the creators responsible for this new trilogy going to approach what many would consider to be the hallmarks of the franchise as a whole? Now that we know the release date and the creators responsible for the movie, the answer remains, very simply, we don’t know.

It’s an exciting place to be for Lucasfilm, and one that’s equally exciting and scary for fans. After five years of projects which have faithfully — perhaps, too faithfully, arguably — followed in the footsteps of the original trilogy, Star Wars once again feels like a property that has an entire galaxy to explore. All that remains to be seen across the next three-and-a-half years is how long Lucasfilm and Disney will let that uncertainty remain as the status quo.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby lhb412 » Tue May 14, 2019 10:59 pm

The Game of Thrones guys are total bores. Wake me up in 2030 when we get Johnson's trilogy.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 15502
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby Dai » Wed May 15, 2019 8:04 am

If next week's conclusion to Game of Thrones causes a critical backlash, expect Kennedy to fire them by the end of June.
User avatar
Dai
Heisei Godzilla
 
Posts: 1041
Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2007 12:07 pm
Location: UK

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby lhb412 » Wed May 15, 2019 10:25 am

^ The show has been on a downward trajectory ever since they ran out of books to adapt, but this overstuffed/rushed final season is really making everyone turn on the series.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 15502
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Wed May 15, 2019 5:28 pm

Deadline May 15, 2019:
‘Game Of Thrones’ Creators David Benioff & D.B. Weiss Shop Global Overall Deal
Mike Fleming Jr wrote:EXCLUSIVE: While millions will be tuning in to watch the Game of Thrones finale Sunday night that they wrote and directed which decides once and for all who sits on the Iron Throne and rules Westeros, Deadline hears David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have six studios waiting on a cliffhanger over what they do next. Those companies are vying to be the place where the duo next creates, writes, directs and produces film and television projects going forward.

Deadline hears that Benioff and Weiss have met with six big media companies that want the duo to sign an overall global deal with them for film, TV and streaming projects. They’ve met with HBO/WarnerMedia, Disney, Comcast, as well as the streaming companies Netflix, Amazon and Apple.

They have ties to several of these companies, and won’t rush into a decision, I’m told. After all, when they created Game of Thrones based on the George RR Martin novels, the show took off so quickly that the duo has focused solely on it for the past decade. They plowed past the plot blueprint established by Martin’s early novels and in later seasons have taken the story beyond the author’s narrative.

While they are aligned to create, write and produce one of the next Star Wars trilogies (Rian Johnson is doing his own, with others in the works), they want to be more prolific but they don’t want to be a factory like some of the producers with huge TV-centric deals. I’m sure finding another big TV followup to Game of Thrones will be a major priority; but being able to take advantage of this new multi-platform landscape is also a priority.

No one can fault their strategy of having concentrated solely on GoT: they’ve won the Prime Time Emmy for Best Drama the last three years the show was eligible, for a drama that went against the binge-ing release strategy of streaming rivals, and remained the strongest water cooler chatter zeitgeist show through its run, with a finale that will shatter ratings that have been sky high for this final season.

They’ve met with the principals across all the platforms at all six major companies. They have relationships at many of these places. The Star Wars films are at Disney and LucasFilm, while Benioff wrote for Universal and Donna Langley a Kurt Cobain project, and they are poised to adapt the prison break tale Dirty White Boys for Emma Watts at Fox. They both have movies ties pre-GoT at Warner Bros, where Benioff scripted Troy and Weiss did script work on Poseidon. The longstanding relationship at HBO is also a very strong one.

Those meetings were set up before the WGA order for writers to fire their agents. I’m told that Benioff & Weiss adhered to the WGA Code of Conduct, and that they will be repped by CAA in areas other than what Article 23 stipulates. They are repped by their longtime lawyer Gretchen Rush in all areas outside of Article 23.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Mon Jun 17, 2019 1:58 pm

THR JUNE 17, 2019:
Lucasfilm Names Michelle Rejwan SVP of Live Action Development and Production
Aaron Couch wrote:Lucasfilm has named producer Michelle Rejwan senior vice president of live action development and production.

She will oversee a new slate of feature films as well as Disney+ series and will continue to produce with Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy.

"Working with Michelle over the last seven years as a producer on both The Force Awakens and now The Rise of Skywalker, I have seen first-hand her skills collaborating with writers and directors, and I've been incredibly impressed with her creative skills and her ability to manage the complexity surrounding these massive projects,” said Kennedy in a statement.

Rejwan is serving as a producer on Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker and has worked with Skywalker filmmaker J.J. Abrams on Super 8, Star Trek Into Darkness and Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

Rise of Skywalker opens Dec. 20 and will will conclude the nine-film saga that began with 1977's Star Wars. Lucasfilm has two new film trilogies in development, one overseen by The Last Jedi director Rian Johnson, the other coming from Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weis.s

On the small screen, Lucasfilm has Jon Favreau's The Mandalorian bowing in November with the launch of Disney+, and is also developing an untitled Rogue One prequel series starring Diego Luna.

“I know the importance of building a team that you trust and have fun working with - it is paramount to our success," Kennedy said of the hire. "There's an exciting momentum building around the future of the franchise, and both myself and the Lucasfilm team look forward to working with Michelle in shaping the future in all areas of story development, from theatrical film development to live action content for Disney+.”
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Aug 15, 2019 7:25 pm

/film:
Benioff and Weiss May Not Write Scripts For All of Their New ‘Star Wars’ Trilogy

THR AUGUST 15, 2019:
Are 'Game of Thrones' Creators a Smart Gamble for Netflix?
Lesley Goldberg wrote:With a game-changing franchise behind them and another that might keep them busy for the next six years, Game of Thrones turned Star Wars maestros David Benioff and Dan Weiss have signed a five-year, $250 million overall deal with Netflix that has been met with envy and a bit of head-scratching.

The biggest TV overalls have gone to prolific showrunners like Shonda Rhimes, Ryan Murphy and Greg Berlanti, who juggle writing with overseeing other creators on multiple programs. Benioff and Weiss, both 48, have focused exclusively on one project and effectively made just 73 episodes of TV. (They wouldn't even start on Star Wars for Disney until Thrones was finished.)

In contrast, Netflix-based Rhimes (four years, $100 million-plus) has eight projects in the works halfway into her deal, Murphy (five years, $300 million) said that he has 10 projects 18 months after moving to the streamer and Berlanti has a TV-record 18 series on the air for Warner Bros. "The only way to make a deal like this work is if you have multiple shows," one top exec tells The Hollywood Reporter. "The bet is that they'll do another Game of Thrones, and that's a big bet."

Sources say the Thrones pair is writing a treatment for a Star Wars trilogy and is committed to penning at least one of the films (the original deal was to write all three). It's unclear if the duo, who also have another feature for Fox/Disney carved out, will do more than just write for Star Wars.

Still, a person familiar with the Netflix deal says the streamer was briefed on their Star Wars schedule and isn't worried: "It's not going to be 10 years [until] Netflix sees their first output," adding that Benioff and Weiss "have a lot of ambition."

"Certain people command [nine figures,] and we've made those deals," says Universal TV president Pearlena Igbokwe, who inked multitasking producer Mike Schur (The Good Place) to a five-year pact valued at $125 million. "[Benioff and Weiss] is not a deal that I went after."

The same is true for HBO, the duo's decade-plus home, which sources say was unwilling to offer the bid they wanted. Instead, HBO parent WarnerMedia is in final talks for a $500 million pact with J.J. Abrams — who already has three shows on the network.
Last edited by mr.negativity on Fri Aug 16, 2019 8:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby XvGojira » Thu Aug 15, 2019 7:31 pm

mr.negativity wrote:/film:
Benioff and Weiss May Not Write Scripts For All of Their New ‘Star Wars’ Trilogy


Having no stock in GOT, I'm fine with that. Like how Lucas didn't right two of the original three, they might work better with just coming up story ideas while focusing on the rest of a director's duties.
User avatar
XvGojira
Burning Godzilla
 
Posts: 4032
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2003 2:29 am
Location: Grand Rapids

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Mon Oct 28, 2019 11:47 pm

Deadline, October 28, 2019:
‘Star Wars’ Setback: ‘Game Of Thrones’ Duo David Benioff & D.B. Weiss Exit Trilogy
Geoff Boucher wrote:EXCLUSIVE: David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, the duo who in 2011 launched the singular screen sensation known as Game of Thrones, have walked away from their much-publicized deal with Disney’s Lucasfilm to launch a feature film trilogy in 2022.

Benioff and Weiss were supposed to usher in the post-Skywalkera era of the Star Wars brand with a 2022 new-start story that would stake out a new frontier for the era-defining cinema brand created by George Lucas. The Emmy-winning pair cited their historic deal with Netflix. They said their enthusiasm for Star Wars remains boundless but, regrettably, their schedule is full up.

“We love Star Wars,” the pair said in a statement to Deadline. “When George Lucas built it, he built us too. Getting to talk about Star Wars with him and the current Star Wars team was the thrill of a lifetime, and we will always be indebted to the saga that changed everything.”

That 2022 release date made the Benioff/Weiss start-up the next-in-line Star Wars installment following this December’s The Rise of Skywalker, the finale chapter of the Skywalker family chronicles that have been captivating moviegoers since 1977.

Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy has plenty of other Star Wars projects in the hopper — The Rise of Skywalker in December, The Madalorian in 15 days on Disney+, and the ramping Ewan McGregor series, to name just three — so it’s unclear how much of a setback the now-nixed trilogy presents. There’s no shortage of upcoming collaborators lined up, either, among them Rian Johnson and Kevin Feige.

Kennedy didn’t close shut any doors in her send-off statement on Monday: “David Benioff and Dan Weiss are incredible storytellers,. We hope to include them in the journey forward when they are able to step away from their busy schedule to focus on Star Wars.”

Clearly, it’s a big-fizzle ending for the firecracker-fuse headline from February 2018 when the deal was announced. But the duo’s deal arguably lost some luster during the much-maligned final season of Game of Thrones earlier this year as many fans questioned whether the GOT creators had the storytelling chops to handle a Jedi saga.

In the end, however, it appears the tandem’s deficiency was in time, not talent. In August, Deadline broke the news that the GOT duo had signed a nine-figure deal with Netflix and, on Monday, that commitment was the one that brought about the end of the Great Westeros Experiment by Disney and Lucasfilm.

“There are only so many hours in the day, and we felt we could not do justice to both Star Wars and our Netflix projects,” the GOT pair said in a statement to Deadline. “So we are regretfully stepping away.”
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:54 pm

VARIETY, OCTOBER 30, 2019:
‘Star Wars’: Inside ‘Game of Thrones’ Creators’ Exit and the Pressures Facing Lucasfilm (EXCLUSIVE)
JUSTIN KROLL and BRENT LANG wrote:It’s become almost comical.

On Monday, “Game of Thrones” showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss became the latest high-profile talents to part ways with the “Star Wars” universe before their movies hit theaters. They’re part of a revolving door of A-list directors who have found it impossible to realize their visions in a corporate culture that is said to invite little creative independence and argument. They join the ranks of Josh Trank, Colin Trevorrow, Phil Lord and Chris Miller in being summarily dismissed from the “Star Wars” productions they were intended to helm. In films of the size and scale of “Star Wars,” it’s not unheard of for productions to run into heated creative disagreements, but the high rate of turnover is raising eyebrows across Hollywood and among the rabid base of fans. It’s also inspiring questions about the management style of Kathleen Kennedy, the executive tasked with guiding Lucasfilm and with finding fresh ways to expand a galaxy far, far away.

“It’s like if you take a job as a ‘Star Wars’ director or creator you’re automatically thrown in the Sarlacc Pit and your chances of getting out and making that film are so unlikely you have to almost be a Jedi master,” says Jeff Bock, a box office analyst with Exhibitor Relations.

Even directors who retained credit for their work experienced issues. “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” helmer Gareth Edwards was essentially replaced by screenwriter Tony Gilroy during extensive reshoots, although he was ultimately the one credited with directing the finished product.

When Kennedy and her team pitched these filmmakers on joining the “Star Wars” family, sources say they were promised some measure of creative control. However, multiple insiders said new ideas were commonly shot down as Kennedy and her team were only looking for people to stick to the company line. If disagreements about the direction of the film became too intense it usually led to the person leaving the project rather than an attempt to find common ground. The Lucasfilm brain trust would often turn to new writers such as Lord and Miller before ultimately retreating to old standbys such as Lawrence Kasdan, the “Empire Strikes Back” writer who is still seen as a key sounding board on the productions. Even if the lack of an appetite for creative risk isn’t to blame, there are questions about whether the abrupt departures of key talent points to a problem in how directors and writers are being vetted and hired.

Benioff and Weiss had ambitious plans to take the “Star Wars” universe in a new direction, one that would exist apart from the Skywalker family saga that comprised the franchise’s centerpiece nine-film series. The “Star Wars” period the pair was interested in exploring was how the Jedi came to exist. However, Lucasfilm executives and the creators begin to see their visions for the films diverge during meetings last summer. News that the pair had signed a massive $250 million production deal with Netflix was a signal to many that they were eager to explore other opportunities. It also brought pressures. When the pact was announced, Netflix said it was aware of the duo’s commitments, but insiders say they were also wary of waiting as much as four years for them to wrap up work on “Star Wars.” The streaming service wanted Benioff and Weiss to focus on creating exclusive movies and shows for them, particularly when they looked out at a streaming landscape that is growing ever more competitive with the launch of Disney Plus and HBO Max.

As relations with Benioff and Weiss curdled, the studio had begun taking general meetings with other writers on possible “Star Wars” pitches — it’s unclear if these were just sit-downs exploring other related productions in the franchise’s cinematic and streaming universe. The departure of the two likely sends the studio back to the drawing board with the future of the series more uncertain than it has been since Disney closed its $4 billion deal for Lucasfilm in 2012. This December brings J.J. Abrams’ “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” and with it the end of that nine-film series. Abrams has been one of the few directors who has been able to successfully navigate the Lucasfilm landscape, but he has a mega-deal with WarnerMedia that will likely mean he won’t be making any more “Star Wars” films. Rian Johnson, who oversaw the more divisive “The Last Jedi,” was said to get along with Kennedy and has maintained that he had creative freedom, but fans balked at some of his decisions. He had been hired to oversee a separate trilogy of “Star Wars” films, which remains in development, though it’s unclear how far along work is on the production. On the streaming front, in November, Disney Plus will release “The Mandalorian,” a series about a mysterious bounty hunter that is getting some positive buzz, and the company is prepping a show centered on Ewan McGregor’s Obi-Wan Kenobi.

However, Disney was clearly stung by the box office failure of “Solo,” a Han Solo origin story that led to the high-profile firing of Lord and Miller. In a recent interview with The New York Times, Disney CEO Bob Iger said, “I just think that we might’ve put a little bit too much in the marketplace too fast.”

Sources at the studio insist that Kennedy’s job is secure despite the churn of filmmaking talent, but insiders at the talent agencies believe that top filmmakers may become wary of working on the series, particularly if the end result will be an embarrassing dismissal. “Star Wars” fans did receive some welcome news when it was revealed the Kevin Feige, the executive credited with guiding the Marvel Cinematic Universe, will work on a standalone “Star Wars” film. That led to speculation that Feige might be brought in to stabilize Lucasfilm, but insiders say that there are no plans to give him a larger role in that division.

Ultimately, analysts say, that the Star Wars brand is potent enough to withstand all the behind-the-scenes drama. With the exception of “Solo,” the movies haven’t just been hits, they’ve been box office juggernauts with few equals.

“I’m sure there are fans of Benioff and Weiss who would have loved to see them do something with the Star Wars world,” said Eric Handler, an analyst with MKM Partners. “But are they going to boycott all Star Wars movies because of it? Probably not. It’s a lost opportunity, but there are other people down the road who will come into the brand and do something new and exciting.”

A spokesman for Disney declined to comment, as did a spokesperson for Benioff and Weiss.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:57 pm

THR, OCTOBER 30, 2019:
Divided Attention and Toxic Fandom: Why the 'Game of Thrones' Duo Bailed on 'Star Wars'
Borys Kit & Lesley Goldberg wrote:Lucasfilm's Kathleen Kennedy is on the hunt for new filmmakers as David Benioff and Dan Weiss leave a galaxy far, far away over their commitment to a lucrative $250 million Netflix deal.

Sometime this past summer, David Benioff and Dan Weiss took their families to Italy. It was partly a vacation, but the Game of Thrones showrunners were also visiting Star Wars creator George Lucas there, doing research for the trilogy of films they were set to oversee after wrapping HBO's Emmy-winning fantasy drama.

Now, a few months later, those plans are as much in ruins as King's Landing. Late Monday came the announcement that Benioff and Weiss were no longer attached to the trilogy they were hired to shepherd back in February 2018. The news, predictably, sparked a frenzy among Star Wars fans on social media.

Some speculated the exit had to do with a rare public appearance the duo made over the weekend at the Austin Film Festival, where they were candid about the mistakes they made during their Game of Thrones reign, and how they had to learn on the job. Others were surprised that it was Benioff and Weiss' trilogy and not the other one in the works, from The Last Jedi writer-director Rian Johnson (who is also in fan crosshairs), that was being shelved.

Benioff and Weiss said Monday that they were caught in the push-and-pull that came with juggling one of the world's biggest movie franchises and the $250 million Netflix deal they signed in August. "There are only so many hours in the day, and we felt we could not do justice to both Star Wars and our Netflix projects. So we are regretfully stepping away [from Star Wars]," read their joint statement.

While there is some truth to their stated reason for parting ways with Lucasfilm, insiders say there is more nuance to the story.

Sources tell The Hollywood Reporter that Benioff and Weiss' exit has been brewing since August. Lucasfilm chief Kathleen Kennedy is said to have been unhappy with the Netflix deal, inked just as they were scheduled to begin work on Star Wars. (Benioff and Weiss had said multiple times that they would not turn their focus to Star Wars until production wrapped on the final season of Thrones, which ended in July 2018.) Kennedy was not convinced the pair — known for focusing on one project at a time — could develop a sci-fi trilogy while also overseeing film and TV projects at Netflix. Sources say that as the duo shopped for an overall deal over the summer, they told potential suitors that they planned to work on Star Wars concurrently with any projects under their new deal.

Sources say Netflix learned of Benioff and Weiss' Star Wars departure mere days before news broke Monday.

Benioff and Weiss’ departure also marks the latest in what has become a tenuous relationship between Netflix and Disney. Sources say Disney was among the early meetings the Thrones pair had for an overall deal, though the Mouse House did not make it to the final round. (Amazon was a frontrunner before Netflix swooped in.) Disney famously severed ties with the streamer years ago when it began pulling back its Marvel movies as it prepared its own Disney+ streaming service. Disney networks more recently began rejecting advertising from Netflix.

Representatives for Disney, Lucasfilm, Netflix, and Benioff and Weiss declined to comment for this story.

While Benioff and Weiss were in high demand after wrapping the megahit Thrones — controversial final season notwithstanding — nine-figure deals such as theirs have traditionally been reserved for prolific producers who can manage multiple projects at once. (Netflix, for example, paid Ryan Murphy $300 million over five years, and he's working on 10 projects less than two years after signing the deal.) Benioff and Weiss, for their part, have never tackled anything other than Game of Thrones and have effectively only made 73 episodes of television over the past decade. (It's also worth noting there was a nearly two-year delay before the abbreviated final season aired, the longest stretch the show was ever off the air.)

Many TV industry insiders at the time questioned why Netflix would spend $250 million to be in second position to Star Wars. But sources familiar with the deal say Netflix and Disney were in a shared first position, meaning the duo could work on both simultaneously. Before signing the deal, Netflix was briefed on the Star Wars plans and wasn't worried about having to wait for them to finish a potential trilogy — earmarked for 2022, 2024 and 2026. "It's not going to be 10 years [until] Netflix sees their first output," one source said, adding that Benioff and Weiss "have a lot of ambition."

At the time of the Netflix pact, Benioff and Weiss were working on a treatment for Disney and Lucasfilm. The pair was committed to penning at least one of the films though the original deal was to write all three.

"They’re deep-dive guys," says one person in their orbit. Adding to the wrinkle was that, according to one source, the Netflix deal required them to be exclusively on the sets of the projects they created during production, and not be away for Star Wars at the same time.

Kennedy, according to a source familiar with her thinking, was nervous. The duo would become the fourth directors to exit a Star Wars project since she took the helm of Lucasfilm. Josh Trank was fired from a Star Wars stand-alone movie in 2015; Chris Miller and Phil Lord was canned from Solo: A Star Wars Story mid-production in June 2017 and, that same year, Colin Trevorrow departed Episode IX, replaced by J.J. Abrams. Production under Kennedy has also run into trouble, with Tony Gilroy brought in to reshoot and rewrite much of Gareth Edwards' 2016 stand-alone Rogue One, and Ron Howard stepping in after Lord and Miller's departure from Solo to finish the project.

When THR exclusively reported last month that Marvel Studios' Kevin Feige, the architect of Disney's multibillion-dollar Marvel Cinematic Universe, will be working with Kennedy on a Star Wars movie, some speculated that the move was an acknowledgement that not all is well in the Star Wars universe. For their part, Disney co-chairmen Alan Horn and Alan Bergman continue to stand by Kennedy. "With the close of the Skywalker Saga, Kathy is pursuing a new era in Star Wars storytelling, and knowing what a die-hard fan Kevin is, it made sense for these two extraordinary producers to work on a Star Wars film together," the studio chiefs said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Benioff and Weiss were also feeling the heat and began having second thoughts about jumping into Star Wars due to what one source described as "toxic fandom."

The creators had built Thrones from the ground up — based on author George R.R. Martin's sprawling novels — and were initially lauded by both critics and fans, who made the show HBO's most watched original series ever. But the divisive six-episode final season that aired in the spring was met with such backlash that the duo backed out of a farewell panel at San Diego Comic-Con in the summer.

To go from Thrones to Star Wars, where fans have bullied actors off social media and taken aim at filmmakers like Johnson? "Who wants to go through that again? Not them," notes another source with knowledge of Benioff and Weiss' thinking. "This was in the 'Life’s Too Short' category."

Whether forces internal or external were in play, Benioff and Weiss wanted out. "It was a hard quit,” says an insider.

It was a different scene when Kennedy brought Benioff and Weiss into the Star Wars galaxy, three months before the underwhelming performance of Solo in May 2018 led Disney and Lucasfilm to re-evaluate its strategy and abandon its stand-alone film ambitions, meaning a number of projects in the pipeline had to be revamped or killed. Abrams' The Rise of Skywalker, with its December release, closes the 40-year saga that began with Lucas' Star Wars: A New Hope in 1977.

Earlier this year, Kennedy met with Benioff, Weiss and The Last Jedi director Johnson — whose own trilogy will explore new realms in the Star Wars universe — to plot the next decade of films. With half those plans now blown up like the Death Star, sources say the Lucasfilm head is actively looking to enlist new filmmakers.

Although Disney and fans might hope for Feige's touch to come to Star Wars sooner rather than later, it's unlikely the Marvel executive's feature will be moved into that December 2022 slot that was once carved out for Benioff and Weiss. Feige, who was recently promoted to expand his oversight to include television as well as film and other creative parts of the comic book powerhouse, will next launch a massive slate of MCU TV spinoffs for Disney+, which launches Nov. 12.

The question many are asking is if Lucasfilm will look beyond white male talent for its film future. Disney+ series The Mandalorian, created by Jon Favreau, boasts a more inclusive roster of behind-the-screen talent than the franchise's big-screen installments have so far, and Kennedy has said she's dedicated to being inclusive behind the camera as well as in front.

One underlying problem Benioff and Weiss' exit illustrates, one source notes, is that there is still no consensus as to what Star Wars is and what Star Wars should be. Disney CEO Bob Iger said there would be a "slowdown" of Star Wars on the big screen, and Lucasfilm shelved a planned Obi-Wan Kenobi movie in favor of making it a Disney+ streaming series, while a planned Boba Fett movie from filmmaker James Mangold was also put on ice. For now, the immediate future of Star Wars will be on the small screen, with Disney+ launching The Mandalorian as its flagship show. In addition to an Obi-Wan series, a Diego Luna-led Rogue One prequel is also in the works.

Unlike Marvel, which has had a clear vision of its cinematic universe, Star Wars has had trouble finding its footing. Johnson took big swings with the mythos in The Last Jedi, and while the film was welcomed by critics and some fans, he was batted down by a vocal portion of the Star Wars community.

“This stuff needs to be sorted before it gets to a cataclysmic point,” says the source.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby daikaijusaurus » Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:10 pm

It's not toxic fandom that is the problem, it's toxic filmmakers and toxic executives in Hollywood. Unfortunately these people have such big egos, that they have to blame their audience instead of themselves.

The below videos explains this perfectly:

phpBB [media]
User avatar
daikaijusaurus
Godzilla Jr.
 
Posts: 442
Joined: Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:05 pm

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mr.negativity » Mon Nov 04, 2019 12:37 pm

Complex:
David Benioff and D.B. Weiss Were Reportedly Removed From 'Star Wars' Following 'Game of Thrones' Finale (UPDATE)

Midnight's Edge:
Before Star Wars: Benioff and Weiss falling out with Martin over Game of Thrones
phpBB [media]
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8481
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby mbozzo » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:13 am

I'm a firm believer that Star Wars should have a 10 years nap after Episode 9. Let's someone else create a a new science fantasy series for the movie screen. :idea:
mbozzo
Godzilla
 
Posts: 876
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2003 11:19 pm

Re: Star Wars: A Game of Clones (Dec. 16, 2022)

Postby Gentleman » Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:58 am

I think their quote about when Lucas built Star Wars, he built them, too explains a lot about what happened to GoT
I'm not a hero. I'm not a savior. Forget what you know.

I'm just a man whose circumstances went beyond his control.
User avatar
Gentleman
Godzilla Jr.
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Sun Apr 27, 2014 5:23 pm


Return to Sci-Fi, Horror, and Fantasy Films and Television

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests