Box Office Discussion

King Kong! Star Trek! The Lord of the Rings! Hellraiser! Star Wars! The Marvel Cinematic Universe! The Universal Monsters! Freddy and Jason! The Dead Trilogy! The DC Cinematic Universe! Battlestar Galactica! Hammer Films! Gorgo! The range of Western Sci-Fi, Horror, and Fantasy Movies and Television programs span the scope of the imagination; this is the forum to discuss them!

"Come get some..."

Moderator: Controllers

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Sun Nov 06, 2016 3:50 am

Box Office: 'Doctor Strange' Heads for Huge $80M-Plus Weekend After $32.6M Friday
Combined, Benedict Cumberbatch's supherhero movie, 'Trolls' and Mel Gibson's 'Hacksaw Ridge' are chasing away the blues at the U.S. box office. One reason? They all earned an A CinemaScore.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Nov 10, 2016 7:27 pm

‘Ben-Hur’ Leads to $48 Million Write-Down at MGM
“Ben-Hur” was one of the summer’s biggest box office flops and the failure of the religious epic depressed profits at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer during the third quarter.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby The Shadow » Fri Nov 11, 2016 7:49 pm

I was surprised that MGM released this during the summer, especially this year when even the big movies were seeing lower BO takes. It always seemed to me that releasing Ben Hur over Christmas would have been a better route.
Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?
User avatar
The Shadow
Burning Godzilla
 
Posts: 2172
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2004 5:25 pm
Location: Kansas

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Sat Dec 03, 2016 7:32 am

‘Your Name’ Becomes Third-Highest-Grossing Japanese Film of All Time
Director Makoto Shinkai’s hit anime feature has earned $196 million at the Japanese box office, passing Studio Ghibli’s ‘Princess Mononoke’ to become the third-highest-grossing film of all time.
Jennifer Wolfe wrote:Director Makoto Shinkai’s hit anime feature Your Name (Kimi no Na wa) has become the third-highest-grossing Japanese film of all time, according to a report by The Hollywood Reporter. Produced by CoMix Wave, the film has earned a whopping $196 million at the domestic box office, surpassing Studio Ghibli’s Princess Mononoke to become the third-highest-grossing film of all time behind Hayao Miyazaki’s Howl’s Moving Castle ($190 million) and Spirited Away ($300 million).

Topping the box office for 12 of its 14 weeks in theaters since its August 26 release, Your Name is the first anime feature outside of Studio Ghibli to gross more than $100 million in Japan. Now the sixth-highest box-office earner in Japan -- imported or domestic -- the film is reportedly on track to overtake Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, which brought in $200 million in 2001, to put it at fourth on the all-time list behind Spirited Away, Titanic and Frozen.

Garnering a nomination in the newly-created Independent Animated Feature category for the 44th Annual Annie Awards, Your Name is currently on the Oscar consideration list in the Best Animated Feature category that will be voted on for the 89th annual Academy Awards. The film had its world premiere at the Los Angeles Anime Expo on July 3, and is set to be released in international territories, including the U.S., where it is being distributed by FUNimation, on Friday.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion: Makoto Shinkai's 'your name'

Postby mr.negativity » Mon Dec 12, 2016 12:07 pm

ANN:
Shinkai's 'your name.' Surpasses 1st Harry Potter Film as Japan's #4 Film of All Time



Japan Box Office: ‘Monster Strike,’ ‘Fantastic Beasts’ Dispute Top Spot
Mark Schilling wrote:This week also saw the release by Toei of the latest feature entry in the long-running “Masked Rider” action series. It made $2.4 million, 24% better than the opening by the previous series installment, in December last year.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion: Makoto Shinkai's 'your name'

Postby mr.negativity » Sun Dec 18, 2016 9:59 am

Shinkai's 'your name.' Becomes #1 Japanese Film in China of All Time
Earns 533 million yuan (US$76.6 million) to surpass Stand By Me Doraemon
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Guy Ritchie's 'King Arthur'

Postby mr.negativity » Thu May 11, 2017 4:30 am

Variety :
Box Office: ‘King Arthur’ Looks Like an Epic Flop
Seth Kelley wrote:In only the second weekend of the summer box office, the first ice-cold front approaches.

“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” looks to continue its reign over the box office this weekend, but it’s far from the most interesting story. That title goes to “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword,” which is anticipating an opening weekend flop of epic proportions for Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow. Off of a $175 million production budget, not taking into account marketing costs, Guy Ritchie’s take on the medieval legend should make $25 million from over 3,600 locations.

Ritchie has seen box office glory in the past with 2009’s “Sherlock Holmes” ($209 million domestic and $524 million worldwide) and its 2011 sequel, “A Game of Shadows” ($187 million, $545 million). But more recently, the director saw a similar fate with his 2015 outing for Warner Bros., “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” The film ended its run with nearly $110 million worldwide off a $75 million budget, despite receiving generally positive reviews from critics.

The same cannot be said for “King Arthur,” which was sliced and diced by the critical community, and currently holds a doleful 23% on Rotten Tomatoes. Variety‘s Peter Debruge panned the movie — which tells the story of Arthur who draws the sword Excalibur from the stone and is confronted with its power — as “just a loud, obnoxious parade of flashy set pieces, as one visually busy, belligerent action scene after another marches by, each making less sense than the last, but all intended to overwhelm.”

Perhaps some of the inevitable blame for the film’s anticipated draw can be shoved onto its star, Charlie Hunnam, who is best known for his role on FX’s “Sons of Anarchy,” and relatively untested as a movie star. The most thought-provoking point of comparison might be 2013’s “Pacific Rim,” which Hunnam anchored. The big-budget action film was widely considered a domestic bummer ($102 million by the end of its run), but scored overseas, leading to a worldwide total of over $400 million. Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow are most likely hoping for similar international traction since there seems to be little stateside.

Not to be confused with Ritchie’s 2000 Brad Pitt-starrer “Snatch,” Fox’s “Snatched” is also opening this weekend. Despite being a mid-budget R-rated comedy, the movie should give “King Arthur” (a big-budget action flick) a run for its money. Amy Schumer and Goldie Hawn star in “Snatched” as a mother and daughter whose exotic vacation goes wildly and dangerously wrong. With an early estimate in the $15 million to $17 million range, some are predicting that it will make more on faith that female-driven comedies like Kristen Wiig’s “Bridesmaids” and Schumer’s own feature debut, “Trainwreck,” are routinely underestimated at the box office. The Chernin Entertainment and Feigco Entertainment production was directed by Jonathan Levine from a script by “Ghostbusters” writer Katie Dippold.

All this to say, Disney’s “Guardians 2” should pummel its new competition on the way to a second weekend on top of the domestic box office. Even if it sees a 60% drop from its opening weekend grosses of $145 million, the sequel to 2014’s surprise hit should more than double the newcomers with around $60 million. In its first 13 days (two weekends overseas and one in the U.S.), James Gunn’s group of unlikely heroes grossed $428 million. The only race for the film now is between itself and the billion-dollar mark.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Jul 07, 2017 3:42 pm

Henry88 wrote:Spider-Man Comes to Sony's Rescue, Looks to Shake Sequel Fatigue
Anousha Sakoui and Reade Pickert wrote:Sony Pictures Chairman Tom Rothman downplays forecasts that the new “Spider-Man” movie will open with sales of $100 million or more this weekend. But it sure needs to.

The Culver City, California-based unit of Sony Corp. is in seventh place at the box office, a lowly spot the studio hasn’t occupied since 2000. And “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” Sony’s sixth film about the Marvel superhero, represents the company’s best chance to create a mega hit and lay the foundation for action films scheduled out to 2019.

“It’s as important as any film they have released in the past 10 years,” said Jeff Bock, senior box office analyst at Exhibitor Relations Co. “It is the last major franchise they have.”

After starting 2017 with a $1 billion write-off and the departure of Michael Lynton, who led the Tokyo-based company’s U.S. film, TV and music businesses, Sony’s entertainment unit needs to start making hit films again. Last year’s “Ghostbusters” revival failed and was followed by disappointments including the star-studded “Passengers.” Rothman, 62, came in more than two years ago after a hacking scandal toppled former studio chief Amy Pascal.

“Spider-Man: Homecoming” marks a chance to get back in the right direction. The picture starring 21-year-old Tom Holland could debut with sales of $122 million in North America this weekend, analysts at BoxOfficePro.com said. Sony is offering a more conservative $80 million.

The movie generated $15.4 million from its night of previews, according to the studio, shy of the $15.6 million “Iron Man 3” registered, to be the sixth-biggest tally for Marvel from early Thursday showings. Sony shares slid 0.3 percent to close at 4,245 yen in Tokyo on Friday.

Rothman, who came to Sony from 20th Century Fox, has reason to be cautious. Many studios’ well-known series have failed to meet expectations this year and U.S. moviegoers are showing signs of fatigue with superhero sequels. While “Spider-Man” has been one of the most popular film characters from the comic book world, the most recent movies haven’t measured up.

The first “Spider-Man” in 2002, starring Tobey Maguire and directed by Sam Raimi, was an unqualified hit, garnering upbeat reviews and global sales of $822 million on a production budget of $139 million, according to Box Office Mojo. By the last picture in 2014 -- the second featuring Andrew Garfield -- reviews had turned mixed, the budget had swelled past $265 million, according to the Hollywood Reporter, and ticket sales totaled $709 million.

Marvel’s Role

For this go-round, Sony turned to Walt Disney Co., recruiting the president of its successful Marvel division, Kevin Feige, as a producer. The company agreed to weave Spider-Man into a larger Marvel storyline featuring many superheroes, while Disney won rights to use the character in movies of its own. Disney retained merchandising rights and could benefit from toy sales linked to the movie.

And costs have come down: the budget for the new film was $175 million, according to Sony.

“It was very much run like a Marvel Studios production,” Feige told reporters in April.

Success would put future Sony superhero films on firmer ground. These include a 2018 release based on the character “Venom,” featuring Tom Hardy, along with an animated Spider-Man. The studio also plans a feature with female leads based on Black Cat and Silver Sable. As part of the deal with Disney, Feige will produce a Spider-Man sequel due out in 2019. Pascal, a producer on “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” will be part of that effort, too.

The new Spider-Man continues a story introduced in last year’s Disney movie “Captain America: Civil War,” which brought in $1.15 billion in worldwide. It will extend through next year’s “Infinity Wars” and possibly another Avengers movie.

Holland’s introduction “began a trajectory of excitement that started over a year ago,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior analyst at ComScore Inc.

Peter Parker

“Homecoming” finds Spider-Man’s alter-ego Peter Parker in high school in Queens, living with Aunt May, played by Marisa Tomei. Joined by Robert Downey Jr. as billionaire Tony Stark/Iron Man, Spider-Man takes on the evil villain Vulture, played by Michael Keaton. “Spider-Man: Homecoming” generated 93 percent positive reviews, according to aggregator Rottentomatoes.com, the second best in the series.

That will be good news to Sony Chief Executive Officer Kazuo Hirai, who has been at the Culver City studio a lot this year after naming Anthony Vinciquerra to replace Lynton as Rothman’s boss. Hirai has been publicly emphatic Sony is committed to its entertainment group.

Sony’s Slate

While stuck in seventh place, Sony has had a modest success this year with the heist movie “Baby Driver” and could have a hit with the “The Emoji Movie,” due July 28. The first of a new series of Stephen King adaptations, featuring Idris Elba and Matthew McConaughey in the “Dark Tower,” is scheduled for next month. Other remakes are also on the horizon, such as “Flatliners” and “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.”

And the studio is contending for future rights to the “James Bond” movie series. Sony generated $3.17 billion in worldwide box-office sales with the previous four spy films, going back to 2006’s “Casino Royale.”

With parent Sony Corp.’s diverse businesses spanning electronics and video games, as well an entertainment, a single movie won’t make or break the company. But “they really need a win here,” said Paul Sweeney, Bloomberg Intelligence analyst.

To compete in the global film market, Sony will “have to have a recurring number of tentpole franchises that you can bring out every year,” Sweeney said. “Two or three bankable franchises that you can go back to every couple years and you try to get lucky with some of the other ones.”


Deadline July 7, 2017:
‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Swinging Toward $105M-$112M+ Weekend Opening
Anthony D'Alessandro wrote:4th Update, Midday Friday: “It’s definitely going over $100M, there’s no way the wheels are falling off this one.” Those are the words of a wise rival distribution executive on the expected results for Sony/Marvel’s Spider-Man: Homecoming which on the low end is looking at a three-day of $105M. That’s bound to be the third best debut for both a Sony release and a Spider-Man movie following 2007’s Spider-Man 3 ($151.1M) and the original 2002 film ($114.8M). Some even see Homecoming busting past $112M, possibly even hitting $120M, but it’s still too early to call those figures. Today alone, Homecoming looks to clear between $42M-$45M with last night representing 34%-37% of that figure.

We hear that Homecoming won’t face the slowdown that impacted Despicable Me 3 last weekend where Friday numbers were high then fell off. A lot of that had to do with families being distracted by the July 4th holiday. And it’s for that very reason why the sixth Spider-Man is opening here, and why Marvel has slotted Ant-Man and The Wasp post Independence Day next year: To avoid any July 4th monkey wrenches. Homecoming is a fanboy film, with some potential family audience built in during matinees. It will be interesting to see how frontloaded business is on this Marvel title. Homecoming is running about 5% ahead of Wonder Woman at the same time and slowly widening the gap (she ended day 1 with Thursday previews at $38.2M). Plus Homecoming had $4.4M million more in previews than her $11M. Sony is seeing $99M, but we hear that there’s too much love out there from audiences for Homecoming.

This Spider-Man cost before P&A a similar amount as other titles in the Marvel Cinematic Universe: $175M. That’s over a third cheaper than Sony’s previous title in the franchise, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 which even with combined theatrical P&A and production costs of $430M saw a profit of $70M-plus after all global TV and home entertainment monies were counted.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Jul 07, 2017 3:48 pm

SUMMER MOVIE SEASON MID-TERM REPORT: FRANCHISE FATIGUE — IT’S REAL, AND IT’S SPECTACULAR
Neil Turitz wrote:So, we’re halfway through the Summer Movie Season, and, as mentioned last week whilst discussing the virtues and benefits of Edgar Wright’s little slice of cinematic cotton candy, we’re stuck in the doldrums here. The box office is lackluster at best, with major, proven entities coming up lame, and poorly marketed comedies not picking up the slack.

Sure, there are a couple bonafide winners here, like the aforementioned Baby Driver, and the two superhero movies, Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2, and Wonder Woman, and Pirates 5 did enough foreign business to potentially lead to a sixth installment, thus carrying on the tradition of letting us see Johnny Depp’s slow, gradual slide into irrelevance played out on a grand scale every third summer or so, but those aside, disappointment abounds.

If this is the midterms section of the season, we’re looking at a D, and that grade is right on the precipice of a D-minus. Maybe even an F. And do you know why?

Because we’re bored. We are bored to tears of the same old, same old. The studios keep shoving these giant tent poles down our throats and, while the foreign audiences still seem to be digging them (especially China), more and more we’re responding with a giant shrug. I wouldn’t say we’re madder than hell, and we’re not going to take this anymore, but we certainly are indifferent as heck, and we’re only going to do this for another little while before we throw up our hands, say, “Meh!” and stop showing up entirely.

It’s why the lesson of Baby Driver is an important one: we do want original content that isn’t necessarily tied to the same old IP’s. Shared Universes are a great idea in theory, but less so in actual practice. That’s one of the reasons why The Mummy failed, because it was so busy building a reality that it didn’t spend enough time telling a cohesive story. Which is why it’s going to lose almost $100 million for Universal.

It’s also why nobody really cares about a Transformers universe and a Bumblebee origin story, or whatever, especially since so few people showed up for the new Transformers flick, which was a solid disappointment. So, too, was Cars 3, as was this past weekend’s Despicable Me 3, both of which came in well under expectations. We’ve got a new Spider-Man movie coming out this weekend which should do some solid business, but if we’re going to make any predictions, I think it’s probably prudent to come in a few million lower than whatever the highest projections might be.

It’s worth mentioning again that there are only five movies thus far to clear $100 million domestically this summer, and while Despicable Me 3 will get there next week, and Spidey will do it pretty quickly, too, this summer’s total is going to be less than last summer’s 15. A lot less. We can come back in a couple months and see what the final total is, but taking a peak at the release schedule, I’ll go on a limb and say that War for the Planet of the Apes, Dunkirk, and Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets all have legitimate shots to join the club, with anything else being something of a shock. That makes 10.

The last time there were that few $100 million films in a summer? That would be 2005. Yikes.

Now, I know what you’re going to say: “But, Neil, Bubby, what about the original studio comedies that have failed, like Snatched, and Rough Night, and The House? All of those were original content films, all studio movies, what happened there, Mr. Smart Guy?”

Well, in order, Amy Schumer is talented, but — as we have previously discussed in this space — not a movie star draw, and there’s no reason to spend $42 million on a comedy starring her and Goldie Hawn. Spend half that amount, and that movie breaks even. Rough Night comes from Columbia Pictures, which has been on a rough spell and has been so focused on launching Spider-Man: Homecoming, that this movie got lost in the marketing shuffle, while The House is a New Line film that — as we have also discussed previously in this space — Warner Bros.’ publicity department had little interest in pushing. (Also, there’s the fact that Will Ferrell is not the draw he used to be, but that’s less important for these purposes than pointing out the failures of the studio which released the movie and, essentially, allowed it to fail.)

Also important, pointing out the success of films like 47 Meters Down, Megan Leavey, and It Comes at Night, not to mention indies like Beatriz at Dinner, The Big Sick, The Lovers, The Hero, and The Beguiled, most of which have not cleared $5 million domestically, but all of which are judged on an entirely different scale than the studio flicks at the top of the box office grosses list.

All of which is to say that the audience on whom the studios have been counting for so much of its overblown tent pole fare just isn’t showing up, because it is suddenly aware that these things being offered as new and exciting are really all stuff that we’ve seen before. Over and over again, in fact, and we’re exhausted. We are suffering from Franchise Fatigue, and it’s not like the prescription is more cowbell.

This isn’t just starting this summer, either. Go back to last year, and there are plenty of lower cost, original content films that came out and did outstanding business, like Central Intelligence, Bad Moms, Sausage Party, Don’t Breathe, Lights Out, and The Shallows.

Yes, last summer’s blockbusters did better business than this year’s, but the trend was at least in sight a year ago, so it’s not like anyone can say this snuck up on us. It didn’t. It’s been coming for a while now. People like me have been talking about this and warning the studios about it for ages, but the studios haven’t been paying attention because they’ve been too busy burying their heads in the sand and saying, “No, no, no, no, no, no, no, no! It’s not true because I don’t want it to be true because this is the way we’ve been doing it for so long that we don’t know how to do it any other way and don’t want to relearn how even if it kills us and destroys the business we’re in because we’re just that stubborn!”

It’s possible that the second half of the summer could surprise us and come up with enough hits to balance things out, but don’t count on it. Truth be told, it’s just too late to save 2017. It might even be too late to save 2018, in fact, what with release schedules and slates set so far in advance. That’s a shame, but all hope isn’t lost quite yet. There is still 2019, 2020, and beyond, all of which are still redeemable. All the studios have to do is look at what’s happening and adjust course. Rethink a couple of those questionable IP choices and replace them with interesting and engaging original ideas from talented filmmakers who know how to tell entertaining stories. Let the audience know that it is being heard, that its desires to see things it hasn’t actually seen before will be met, that its patronage is not only key, but also the very lifeblood of the industry, and its will is not being ignored.

The question is, are we actually going to learn anything from this? One can hope, of course, but then we remember exactly with whom we are dealing, and that the studios don’t take lessons nearly as well as the rest of us do.

Still, hope does spring eternal. Ideally, it will be rewarded, but I’m not holding my breath.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby O.Supreme » Fri Jul 07, 2017 5:01 pm

I'm not going to go on the bandwagon about "franchise" fatigue, or Universe Building fatigue. I like most movies associated with these, but I'll acknowledge it exists. But I do agree there are simply too many big movies. I was blown away to hear that most American families only go to the theater on average ONCE per year...I mean growing up in the 80's my family only went 2-3 times and I thought we were pretty conservative considering it seemed my friends were going all the time.

But if you go back 20 years, when Titanic had that insane 15 week run at #1 (Granted for the longest time Feb-memorial day was usually the worst season for movies) , there were only a few major big budget blockbusters per year. A film could easily stay at #1 for over a month.

Going back to December 2015, The Force Awakens was the last movie to stay #1 for 4 full weeks. 2016 had 7 films that topped the charts for 3 consecutive weeks, five of those were Disney owned films. (Zootopia, Jungle Book, Finding Dory, Moana, and Rogue One). the others were Deadpool and Suicide Squad.

Looking at 2017 so far only 2 films have topped the charts for 3 consecutive weeks, and they aren't what you might think. Split (which benefitted from lack of competition in Jan/Feb), and Furious 8 (which also had no competition in April). Since then almost every week a new Major film has come out and even films that in the past would be staples of summer are getting buried by other films in most instances 2 weeks or less, which I think actually hurts the whole industry. Oddly enough it seems there is such a thing as having too many choices.

Looking at the current trend beginning in June

Wonder Woman had 2 weeks at #1
Cars 3 had 1 week
TF 5 had 1 week
DM 3 will have 1 week

Now here's where it gets interesting...

War For the Planet of the Apes comes out on 7/14/17. These films are so well received critically, and have a solid fan-base, but I think it might actually open in 2nd place if Spider-Man performs well

In either case both those films will fall to (2 and/or 3 respectively) When Dunkirk comes out on 7/21.

7/28 has The Emoji Movie, which will be fun for kids, but I think it will open at #2 behind a strong positive reaction to Dunkirk.

In fact Dunkirk's timing may win it the summer...as 8/4 offers its only competition in The Dark Tower, which may again get buried. In fact traditionally there has always been one late summer offering in August that won crowds over. I actually see nothing in August that screams overwhelming favorite. Dunkirk may win the summer simply by being the LAST big movie, which I didn't expect at all.

I wonder if this will cause studios to rethink their strategy. We've already seen them break tradition and go as early as February to dominate that sweet February-Memorial Day spot that was so lacking before. I know studios want as many people as possible to see their films. I wonder if they may considering putting off their releases until late August or even September, another time when traditionally big movies are sorely lacking due to *back to school* syndrome, and before the fall horror fest.
There are no more good TV Shows, only ones that haven't disappointed me yet.
O.Supreme
Burning Godzilla
 
Posts: 3414
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2006 6:02 pm
Location: Born in the Bay Area, but stuck in Sacto

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby Benjamin Haines » Thu Jul 13, 2017 2:52 pm

Franchise fatigue is definitely a thing but it's not an overarching trend. It's not like moviegoers have ever collectively decided to shun every sequel that comes along, as big-budget franchise sequels are always among the top earners every year. Franchise fatigue happens on a case-by-case basis. Every franchise has a fluctuating shelf life and it's all about maintaining cultural relevance to keep audiences coming back.


O.Supreme wrote:But if you go back 20 years, when Titanic had that insane 15 week run at #1 (Granted for the longest time Feb-memorial day was usually the worst season for movies) , there were only a few major big budget blockbusters per year. A film could easily stay at #1 for over a month.

Going back to December 2015, The Force Awakens was the last movie to stay #1 for 4 full weeks. 2016 had 7 films that topped the charts for 3 consecutive weeks, five of those were Disney owned films. (Zootopia, Jungle Book, Finding Dory, Moana, and Rogue One). the others were Deadpool and Suicide Squad.

Looking at 2017 so far only 2 films have topped the charts for 3 consecutive weeks, and they aren't what you might think. Split (which benefitted from lack of competition in Jan/Feb), and Furious 8 (which also had no competition in April). Since then almost every week a new Major film has come out and even films that in the past would be staples of summer are getting buried by other films in most instances 2 weeks or less, which I think actually hurts the whole industry. Oddly enough it seems there is such a thing as having too many choices.

Looking at the current trend beginning in June

Wonder Woman had 2 weeks at #1
Cars 3 had 1 week
TF 5 had 1 week
DM 3 will have 1 week

Now here's where it gets interesting...

War For the Planet of the Apes comes out on 7/14/17. These films are so well received critically, and have a solid fan-base, but I think it might actually open in 2nd place if Spider-Man performs well

In either case both those films will fall to (2 and/or 3 respectively) When Dunkirk comes out on 7/21.

7/28 has The Emoji Movie, which will be fun for kids, but I think it will open at #2 behind a strong positive reaction to Dunkirk.

In fact Dunkirk's timing may win it the summer...as 8/4 offers its only competition in The Dark Tower, which may again get buried. In fact traditionally there has always been one late summer offering in August that won crowds over. I actually see nothing in August that screams overwhelming favorite. Dunkirk may win the summer simply by being the LAST big movie, which I didn't expect at all.

I wonder if this will cause studios to rethink their strategy. We've already seen them break tradition and go as early as February to dominate that sweet February-Memorial Day spot that was so lacking before. I know studios want as many people as possible to see their films. I wonder if they may considering putting off their releases until late August or even September, another time when traditionally big movies are sorely lacking due to *back to school* syndrome, and before the fall horror fest.


The glut of movies at the multiplex is taking a toll on certain releases and it's affecting overall box office in a number of ways. That being said, weekend chart rankings are mostly a big red herring. A movie's level of success can't be measured by how many weekends it spends at #1 on the box office chart.

Titanic's 15-weekend run in the #1 spot in 1997-1998 was a wholly unique phenomenon. No other 1997 release spent more than three weekends at #1, and the only 1998 release that held the top spot for four weekends was Saving Private Ryan. There was another wholly unique phenomenon on the opposite end of the spectrum from Titanic that was just as remarkable. My Big Fat Greek Wedding opened in April 2002 in just 108 theaters and ranked #20 in its debut weekend. Thanks to very positive word of mouth and growing consumer demand, the movie expanded at a leisurely pace while its weekend box office takes mostly went up! It didn't play in over 1,000 theaters until its 18th weekend and it never reached #1 in the weekend box office ranking. It peaked at #2 in its 20th weekend, which was Labor Day weekend and also the single largest weekend gross of the movie's entire run ($11m 3-day, $14m 4-day holiday). It continued to hold up all the way into 2003 and its next under-$1m weekend haul didn't come until Valentine's Day, the movie's 44th weekend in theaters! It eventually wrapped up in mid-April 2003 with a $241m domestic total after playing successfully for one whole year. And it never ranked #1 on the weekend charts! It actually held the record for the highest-grossing movie never to hit #1 until Sing topped it this past winter.

If we only look at how many weekends each movie spends at #1, then Wonder Woman looks like just another movie that spent two weekends at #1 and that's it, but that doesn't measure how remarkably well Wonder Woman is performing. Just look at the film's grosses and weekend-to-weekend percentage drops compared to the prior DC Extended Universe entries:

Image

Wonder Woman had the lowest opening weekend of any of these four DC films, a still-excellent $103m debut, but since its second weekend the film has consistently posted higher weekend grosses than its predecessors. The movie's outstanding box office legs made it the top domestic earner of the DC Extended Universe within just five weeks. Even when Spider-Man: Homecoming launched with $117m this past weekend, Wonder Woman still only dropped -37.5% for a $9.8m sixth weekend. The film's current $371m domestic cume is already 3.59x its opening weekend figure after just 40 days of North American play, which would be a great multiplier for any movie but is absolutely fantastic for a high-profile tentpole that opens big from the outset, and it's not even done yet! Wonder Woman is on track to top Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 as the biggest domestic hit of the summer.
Image
User avatar
Benjamin Haines
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 5436
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2004 3:38 pm
Location: North Carolina

Re: 'Despicable Me 3' Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Jul 14, 2017 6:35 am

User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Jul 21, 2017 3:29 pm

Collider July 21,2017:
Fox Reportedly “Reassessing” Future of the ‘Alien’ Franchise in Wake of ‘Alien: Covenant’

Collider July 21,2017:
Universal Eyeing Channing Tatum to Star in ‘Van Helsing’

THR JULY 21,2017:
Hollywood Rethinks Key Movie Franchises Amid a Mixed Summer at the Box Office
Rebecca Ford, Borys Kit, and Carolyn Giardina wrote:Humdrum numbers leave some brands in question, with lower budgets and younger casts likely for those that return.

The mixed box-office bag for this summer's tentpole films is forcing studios to revisit their strategies for keeping individual franchises going.


Spider-Man
Even before Homecoming hit theaters, Sony ordered a sequel for July 5, 2019, with Jon Watts now in negotiations to return as director.

The sequel will spin out of the events that unfold in Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War (May 4, 2018), which also will star Holland.

But the real test will come as Sony expands its Spider-Man universe without Marvel's help. Venom (slated for release on Oct. 5, 2018) shoots this fall with director Ruben Fleischer and star Tom Hardy; and the female-superhero-led Silver & Black (which doesn't have a release date yet) will be directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood. The studio is convinced that emphasizing Homecoming's high school setting was key to the reboot.

"It’s a trap to mistake extra bombast for heightened emotion,” says Sony Pictures Motion Picture Group chairman Tom Rothman. "Even huge spectacle, absent of great characters, is ultimately numbing. Making the audience care is a lot harder than making things blow up."


Transformers
The fifth installment, The Last Knight, opened to a series low ($69.1 million in its domestic debut over the Fourth of July holiday weekend). While it has seen more action abroad for an international gross of $392.4 million, it is still expected to be the lowest-grossing entry in the Transformers franchise to date, and has only earned $517.3 million worldwide in four weeks.

Now, Paramount is cutting costs. Its Bumblebee spin-off is pegged at $70 million-plus (according to sources), compared to Last Knight's $217 million.

A younger cast, headed by Hailee Steinfeld, 20, will be directed by Travis Knight when filming starts in August. The story, centered on the yellow bot, will be set in 1987.

"We are trying to please the fans and also give them a new experience," says producer Lorenzo di Bonaventura. "Plus, there’s a new audience introduced to the franchise every 10 years, and we have an obligation to that new audience."


Wonder Woman
By waving a feminist flag, director Patty Jenkins breathed new life into the DC universe. Wonder Woman has earned $765 million to date, and not only earned critical praise, but, eight weeks in, boasts the best hold of any superhero film in more than 15 years at the North American box office.

Warner Bros. quickly started negotiations with Jenkins for a sequel (star Gal Gadot already has signed on for multiple DC films), which it will officially unveil July 22 at Comic-Con.


Alien
Ridley Scott's Alien: Covenant dropped 71 percent in its second weekend, and has earned $232 million worldwide. Sources say Fox will have to reassess two intended sequels Scott has pitched while he is off helming Getty kidnapping movie All the Money in the World and then drug lord drama The Cartel.


The Mummy
Despite the film's lackluster performance ($389.6 million worldwide to date), Universal is moving forward with its monster-filled Dark Universe, but slowly, to allow for more script development. The stories will be tied together by Russell Crowe’s Dr. Jekyll.

Convinced Tom Cruise saved Mummy from being a bigger flop, the studio is betting on names, prepping an offer to Angelina Jolie for Bride of Frankenstein (slated for release on Feb. 14, 2019) and polishing the script for Van Helsing, aimed for Channing Tatum. Johnny Depp is attached to star in The Invisible Man.


Planet of the Apes
The current trilogy has run its course as War for the Planet of the Apes opened lower domestically ($56 million) than its predecessor. But while director Matt Reeves has moved on to Warners' The Batman movie, he is still interested in returning for a spin-off based on one of the other apes.

"The whole idea of Bad Ape is that there are other apes out there, and those apes don’t have the benefits of Caesar's leadership. The conflicts of the future are not going to be humans and apes, they will be apes and apes," Reeves told THR. "I wanted to seed that idea because I thought there were a lot more stories and there are characters that I have grown to love."


Cars
Cars 3's $54 million domestic opening was a franchise low, and there are no official plans for a sequel, though Disneytoon Studios (which made the Planes films), planning an untitled movie about fighter jets for 2019, isn't giving up on anthropomorphic transport. At the D23 convention on July 14, the studio debuted some early footage that had a feel similar to Top Gun.


Fast & Furious
With The Fate of the Furious' $1.2 billion worldwide gross, the franchise appears impervious to fatigue. So it’s no wonder that the studio is chugging ahead with the ninth (April 19, 2019) and tenth (April 2, 2021) installments and exploring a spin-off movie that would star Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham.


Despicable Me
Although Despicable Me 3, which opened on June 30, is trailing behind Despicable Me and Despicable Me 2 in box-office revenue (at press time it had earned $191 million in North America and $625 worldwide), Illumination Entertainment is already well on its way to extending its popular, $3.3 billion franchise with Minions 2, which is slated to arrive July 3, 2020.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: The Despicable Me Franchise

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:35 am

/Film August 7th, 2017:
‘The Dark Tower’ Underperforms as ‘Despicable Me’ Becomes the Highest-Grossing Animated Franchise of All Time
Jack Giroux wrote:One movie that found its audience right off the bat is Despicable Me 3. It made close to $900 million this summer. Following the major success, Illumination Entertainment’s series is now the most successful animated franchise of all time. The Despicable Me and Minions movies have grossed over $3.528 billion at the worldwide box-office, surpassing Shrek‘s $3.51 billion. The fact Minions is Universal’s most profitable movie in studio history certainly helps. According to Deadline, before its theatrical run, Despicable Me 3 should make a few more millions of dollars for Universal execs to swim in come Labor Day.


Deadline August 6, 2017:
‘Despicable Me’ Becomes Top-Grossing Animated Film Franchise Ever Worldwide


Box Office Mojo: Despicable Me 3
Domestic Total as of Aug. 6, 2017: $240,920,645
Foreign Total as of Aug. 6, 2017: $640,707,151
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Aug 29, 2017 1:12 am

THR 08/28/2017:
Summer Box Office Suffers Historic Decline in U.S.
Pamela McClintock wrote:The sequelitis virus that first invaded Hollywood last year only grew worse this summer. A number of franchise installments underperformed domestically, including Transformers: The Last Knight ($132 million), The Mummy ($80.1 million) and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales ($172 million). While Pirates 5 certainly fared the best, it paled in comparison to the previous installments.

The good news for a worried Hollywood? The international box office — which is up more than 3 percent year-to-date — helped save a number of summer event films that underperformed in the U.S. Pirates 5 has grossed $618 million overseas for a global total of $790 million, while Transformers 5 stands at $604 million globally after earning $474 million offshore. And The Mummy scared up $328 million abroad for a worldwide cume of $407.8 million.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby lhb412 » Tue Aug 29, 2017 10:21 pm

^It was a crappy year for the box office, but a good year for movies. I probably see five new films in theaters a year on average, but this year we still have four months left and I've seen *thinks for a moment* : Get Out, Your Name, Colossal, GotG2, Spider-Man, Wonder Woman, Skull Island, Baby Driver, and John Wick 2. Kong and Baby Driver I saw multiple times.

Later this year we have Shape of Water, Thor, Star Wars, and even Mary and the Witch's Flower is supposed to get a theatrical run.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 15503
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby klen7 » Wed Aug 30, 2017 9:31 am

lhb412 wrote: Mary and the Witch's Flower is supposed to get a theatrical run.

Ohh! Is that going to be dubbed by any chance?
User avatar
klen7
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 7295
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:34 pm
Location: beyond your peripheral vision

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby lhb412 » Wed Aug 30, 2017 9:35 am

^I don't know. Saw the trailer before the screening of Castle in the Sky this Monday and it was the Japanese trailer with Japanese audio with some added English titles.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 15503
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Aug 31, 2017 8:06 am

THR 8/31/2017:
Movie Theater Chain Stocks Collapse During Dismal Summer
Paul Bond wrote:Regal Entertainment has seen shares plunge 28 percent while AMC Entertainment dropped a dramatic 45 percent.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby lhb412 » Thu Aug 31, 2017 8:43 pm

Wait, how wide a release is Magnolia giving this movie?!

phpBB [media]


I mean, sometimes they only do the big cities and other times they do practically a wide release. If this plays anywhere near me I'm going!
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 15503
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:32 pm

VARIETY NOVEMBER 16, 2017:
Can Warner Bros.’ Expensive, Long-Awaited ‘Justice League’ Deliver the Hit That DC Needs?
Ricardo Lopez wrote:Warner Bros. is holding its breath as the studio prepares to unveil “Justice League” this weekend.

The costly superhero team adventure carries a production budget of more than $250 million, according to several sources, and with it, the hope that DC’s interconnected cinematic universe of comic book heroes and villains can deliver huge audiences around the globe.

When tens of millions of dollars in worldwide marketing and distribution costs are added in, “Justice League” would have to bring in a lofty sum of around $600 million from ticket sales alone and additional revenue from ancillaries like pay-TV and home entertainment in order to turn a profit.

Warner Bros. executives are already concerned that the movie’s debut this weekend — projected to be $110 million — is less than what they had hoped for. In comparison, last year’s “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” opened to $166 million. The film will also face some competition over the upcoming holiday weekend from another big release, Disney/Pixar’s “Coco,” though the animated film skews younger. So far, early reaction to “Justice League” has been mixed both among critics and fans. Some have panned it, while others have praised its lighter tone.

Also weighing on the picture is whether audiences will embrace new characters, the Flash, Cyborg and Aquaman, all of whom appear on the big screen for the first time. The trio will get their own standalone films, starting with Aquaman in December 2018. The Flash and Cyborg films are set for release in 2020.

DC’s cinematic universe has had a bumpy roll-out in recent years. While last year’s “Suicide Squad” and “Batman v Superman” collectively grossed $1.6 billion worldwide, they drew poor reviews and scorn by some comic book fans. Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman,” however, provided a much-needed jolt of success to the DC franchise, bringing critical acclaim, as well as $822 million at the global box office.

A “Justice League” dud would be sure to deflate DC’s sails and renew efforts at the studio to focus on individual films rather than on continuity between movies and characters.

“When you have iconic characters like this and a brand like ‘Justice League,’ and even the individual brands of those characters, there’s pressure on the movie to deliver,” said the film’s producer Chuck Roven. “We were really happy with the response creatively, critically and financially on ‘Wonder Woman.’ It would be great if this film could deliver some level of the same kind of response in those same areas. The fans are going to have to tell us.”

“Justice League” has a lot to live up to as 2017 has featured a slew of well-reviewed superhero films like Marvel’s “Thor: Ragnorok” and “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” both of which had Rotten Tomato scores above 90%. Rotten Tomatoes, which delayed releasing its score of reviews of “Justice League” until Thursday, reported a score of 40%. Rotten Tomatoes delayed the release of the score to reveal it on its new Facebook show, “See It/Skip It,” early Thursday morning. The movie ratings site, which is part-owned by Warner Bros., also recently held back the score for “A Bad Moms Christmas” to reveal it on the new Facebook program.

“The pressure is on to keep the perfect 2017 superhero track record alive,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior analyst for ComScore. “There’s a lot of pressure on many fronts. (“Justice League”) is a key building block of the future of DC.”

In promoting the film, Warner dealt with the conundrum of Ben Affleck as Batman. Affleck’s turn as the Caped Crusader has not been received with the same enthusiasm as past Batmans. Warner Bros. has instead focused its marketing on Gal Gadot, capitalizing on her newfound popularity from “Wonder Woman.” Speculation persists that Affleck’s appearance in future Batman films will end with “The Batman,” the Matt Reeves-directed film that was originally set to be directed by Affleck. Studio insiders say privately that they are ready to cast a new Batman, and in a recent interview with USA Today Affleck said he would like to find a “graceful and cool” way to exit.

“It doesn’t take a genius to figure out why ‘Wonder Woman’ is front and center in all of the marketing,” Deragarabedian said, adding: “Any time you’re changing casting, it always presents challenges. While we’ve always seen iconic characters change casting, it is always tricky because you like to have a consistency there.”

The almost decade-long effort to bring “Justice League” to bear comes amid an evolution in style and tone for the superhero genre as a whole. It seems that sometime during the making of “Justice League,” the ground shifted beneath the feet of DC. “Guardians of the Galaxy” and “Deadpool” started to bring a levity to films that had previously seen superheroes take themselves too seriously.

Fast-forward to “Ragnarok,” the Marvel entry that dialed up the funny with slapstick humor and witty writing, becoming the best-reviewed Marvel film to date.

DC films are adjusting, too, starting with Jenkins. “Wonder Woman” teemed with themes like love, hope and friendship – a stark contrast to the “Dark Knight” trilogy, as well as “Batman v Superman,” which explored far more darker views of humanity.

This past summer, Warner brought in Joss Whedon, known for his wry writing style, to take on “Justice League” after director Zack Snyder stepped away in May to deal with the death of his daughter. Re-shoots, made complicated by the competing schedules of all the actors, lasted two months and cost $25 million. Roven, however, said the film will be an amalgam of Snyder and Whedon’s styles.

“The DNA of the movie was already set, and Joss was working on script re-shoot pages with Zack,” Roven said. “Everybody kind of knew for the most part what was going to be shot. Of course, Joss is his own creative entity so he’s going to put some of his DNA into it also, but the vast majority of it was already set.”

Brent Lang contributed to this report.


THR NOVEMBER 17, 2017:
Weekend Box Office: 'Justice League' Heading For $95M-Plus U.S. Bow
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:12 pm

Deadline November 17, 2017:
‘Justice League’ Currently Stumbling With $97M+ Opening: Are ‘Wonder’ & ‘Thor’ Cutting Into Business?
Anthony D'Alessandro wrote:2ND UPDATE, Friday midday: It’s still early and right now Justice League‘s Friday, including its $13 million last night, is between $36.6M-$38.5M for today. At the top end, that’s $300K higher than Wonder Woman’s Friday, and she was boosted by an $11M Thursday night. This puts Justice League around $97M-plus per industry estimates, far lower than the $110M-$120M on tracking.

Why? Because Justice League‘s morning sales weren’t as robust as many expected.

To avoid such sluggish numbers, DC needs to meet both critical and audience positive sentiment equally, like Marvel — it’s the only way to avoid this roller-coaster ride at the box office. Critics weren’t kind to Justice League with a 39% Rotten Tomatoes score, which is just slightly higher than Suicide Squad and Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice. PostTrak’s overall positive score for Justice League is upbeat at 85% and a high 69% definite recommend.

BvS got a B CinemaScore and Suicide Squad earned a B+. We’ll see what that crowd has to say tonight. Hopefully for WB and DC good word of mouth clicks in.

Warner Bros execs truly aimed to make this title lighter and funnier than the gloom of Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice and definitely shorter (2 hours vs. 2 1/2 hours), and anything under $100M would likely make Warner Bros brass unhappy: That’s not what they planned for here given how this film has been in development over the past 10 years. I, mean, this is DC’s Avengers. It’s the zenith of the DC universe. Should Justice League rebound into Wonder Woman territory ($103.2M), it will still be hard to jump up and down since Justice League before P&A cost double what Wonder Woman did ($149M) with the Joss Whedon reshoots, etc.

Fanboys and critics have dinged Justice League and BvS for being of a visualist versus a Kubrickan cinematic bent, the latter of which Christopher Nolan delivered to the Dark Knight franchise. There was promise when Whedon stepped in, but as one rival studio executive told me, “I’ve never heard of a director completely changing the DNA of a movie when he’s called in for reshoots. That’s inherent in the script from the onset.”

I hear though that if the film clears $700M global, after ancillaries, it will turn a profit, but not much. Overseas including China is currently at $42.4M.

Also, realize that the Gal Gadot quotient could be slow to show up here. Older women were there for Wonder Woman during opening weekend, with PostTrak showing females 25+ (37%), followed by guys over 25 (34%), females under 25 (17%), and men under 25 (12%). However, the share of women grew over time for Wonder Woman. Gadot’s Wonder Woman does have her moments in the movie.

For Justice League last night, PostTrak showed men over 25 in bulk (41%), men under 25 (25%), females over 25 (21%) and females under 25 (14%).

Disney/Marvel’s Thor: Ragnarok is also cutting into Justice League‘s business, hence the possible danger of putting another DC mega superhero film too close to a well-received Marvel rival; Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 and Wonder Woman were spaced out by a month. Ragnarok is currently estimated to have a third Friday of $5.9M-$6.5M and a three-day of $20M in third place.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby lhb412 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:18 pm

^Wow.... so Wonder is doing well, eh? Good. I'm glad for that little film.
User avatar
lhb412
Millennium Godzilla
 
Posts: 15503
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:11 pm

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:18 am

FORBES NOV 19, 2017:
$51M China Debut For 'Justice League' Says Forget 'Avengers' -- 'A Dog's Purpose' Is Now The Target
Rob Cain wrote:Here’s the list of Hollywood movies that had bigger opening weekends than Justice League in China this year:

Fate of the Furious - $193 million

Transformers: The Last Knight - $124 million

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter - $94 million

Kong: Skull Island - $72 million

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales - $66 million

Spider-Man: Homecoming - $66 million

Despicable Me 3 - $64 million

xXx: The Return of Xander Cage - $62 million

War For the Planet of the Apes - $58 million

Thor: Ragnarok - $54 million

Add to that list the four Chinese films that bettered Justice League’s debut, and you’ve got 14 movies that opened stronger in 2017 than the Warner/DC superhero tent-pole.

As far as I know, not one of those pictures cost as much, took as long to develop, or had more valuable IP behind it than Justice League. Certainly none of them had as much riding on their success, because Justice League was supposed to be not only the crown jewel of the DC empire, it was also supposed to be the springboard for the success of future pictures like Aquaman, Cyborg, and Justice League 2.

To all of which China has yawned and said, “Meh.”

Justice League opened with $51 million in China this weekend, slightly below Thor: Ragnarok’s numbers, and has trailed further behind the MCU picture—which released two weeks ago—with each successive day. Its 32 percent Saturday-to-Sunday drop is bigger than the 27 percent Thor experienced in its first weekend. Thor: Ragnarok has collected $106 million in the PRC through Sunday, and should finish up at around $112 million. Because Justice League isn’t holding as well, the $51 million that it has earned so far is indicative of a probable sub-$100 million total.

When the Warner Bros. and DC Entertainment executives who oversaw Justice League received their import approval for China, they probably looked at the $240 million PRC gross earned by Avengers: Age of Ultron in 2015, licked their lips and thought “Great!” Maybe they even considered this year’s Fate of the Furious and its $381 million with anticipation, thinking of it as a target.

But no one, I’m certain of this, no one could have dreamt even in their deepest, darkest nightmares that the target now would be the $88 million earned in China this past April by A Dog’s Purpose. A humble little movie with no stars, no meaningful IP, little prior audience awareness, a picture that focuses mainly on the thoughts inside the head of a reincarnated dog, now stands as Justice League’s Mt. Everest.

Justice League now needs a 1.73x multiple on its opening weekend gross to move past A Dog’s Purpose and become one of China’s 25 top-grossing movies this year. It’s an achievable goal, but by no means a certainty. Resident Evil's multiple was 1.70x, and it finished at $158 million in China. Transformers 5’s was 1.75x, which took it to $224 million.

Forget about Avengers, Fate of the Furious, and Wolf Warriors. Thor: Ragnarok. Forget about Ant-Man or Spider-Man or Thor: Ragnarok. In China, Justice League is now in the dog house.

Kapow! China Clobbers $1 Billion Global Hopes For 'Justice League' With $16M Opening Day
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

Re: Box Office Discussion

Postby mr.negativity » Sun Dec 17, 2017 11:10 pm

Box Office Mojo December 17, 2017:
'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' Delivers Second Largest Opening Ever
Brad Brevet wrote:With an estimated $220 million, Star Wars: The Last Jedi delivered the second largest opening weekend ever behind only Star Wars: The Force Awakens, which debuted with $247.9 million back in 2015. Last Jedi got off to a strong start on Thursday night with the second largest preview gross ever of $45 million and became only the second film to ever gross over $100 million on opening day resulting in the second largest opening day ever, second largest single day, second largest Friday and joins Force Awakens as the fastest films to reach $100 million.
User avatar
mr.negativity
Meltdown Godzilla
 
Posts: 8483
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:27 am
Location: The Negative Zone

PreviousNext

Return to Sci-Fi, Horror, and Fantasy Films and Television

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests