the career of: George Lucas

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Re: the career of: George Lucas

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Nov 24, 2015 3:52 am

George Lucas says if he could be any 'Star Wars' character, he'd be Jar Jar Binks
Anjelica Oswald wrote:Of all the characters in "Star Wars," creator George Lucas says he'd be Jar Jar Binks in a video for Vanity Fair.

"I like all the characters," he said when posed the question of which character he'd want to be, before making his unusual choice.

In the interview, Lucas gives his thoughts on the new "Star Wars" film, and he says that he doesn't enjoy being criticized for making the movies he wants to make.

"You go to make a movie and all you do is get criticized, and people try to make decisions about what you're going to do before you do it, and it's not much fun," he says. "You can't experiment. You can't do anything. You have to do it a certain way. I don't like that; I never did.";

He'd rather make experimental films.

"I started out in experimental films, I want to go back to experimental films, and of course, nobody wants to see experiemental films."
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Re: the career of: George Lucas

Postby O.Supreme » Tue Nov 24, 2015 11:53 am

If by "experimental films" he means original ideas/stories, that is sad, but true. I only go to see about 5-6 movies in a given calendar year, most of which are between May & July. But most of these will be sequels to established franchises, or based on existing material I am already a fan of.
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Re: the career of: George Lucas

Postby jellydonut25 » Tue Nov 24, 2015 3:18 pm

That's all just...LIES. It's lies. If George Lucas REALLY wanted to make experimental movies, he would. He's a billionaire ($5.1 billion net worth). He could afford to self-fund a small little experimental movie. He doesn't WANT to, if he did, he'd have done it by now. His recent, non-Star Wars movies (with varying levels of involvement) are:
Indiana Jones 4
Red Tails
Strange Magic

That's in 10 years. And NONE of those are experimental movies.
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Re: the career of: George Lucas

Postby O.Supreme » Tue Nov 24, 2015 5:01 pm

Not trying to defend him, I know he is caught up in his own thinking but... Other than Indy 4, I have never heard of those other two films. If they are not original or "Experimental" films, perhaps in his skewed since they are, and if they failed, he doesn't want to try.

If I had Billions, I'd make films for both myself (where I didn't care what anyone thought), and also other films for fans (assuming I had any :wink: ). Sure nobody likes to be negatively criticized, but if the films are "for you" then who cares? I think he wants to be liked, which is only natural, much more so than he lets on, which is sad.
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Re: the career of: George Lucas

Postby tbeasley » Wed Dec 16, 2015 2:54 am

I'm having a Lucas/Star Wars marathon before The Force Awakens. What really struck me for the first time is the pseudo-documentary tone THX, American Graffiti and the original Star Wars have. Graffiti I feel is his best film, and it makes me curious for the first time to check out the sequel More American Graffiti.

With Lucas out of the director's chair for Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, those movies have a more traditional cinematic feel to them. Which is quite fine and everything, Empire is about as classy and well made as a big movie like this can get. It moves in ways no other Star Wars films does. It's remembered as the 'dark' one, but it's also quite funny in places to balance this out. I think a lot of modern movies (especially sequels) forget about this.

As for Jedi, I don't think it balances light and dark as well as Empire. The teddy bear-like Ewoks really clash with the heavier Luke/Vader/Emperor scenes. I wish Lucas wasn't as intent on having primitive beings help defeat the Empire, I would have much preferred Wookiees.
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Re: the career of: George Lucas

Postby O.Supreme » Wed Dec 16, 2015 12:12 pm

tbeasley wrote:I wish Lucas wasn't as intent on having primitive beings help defeat the Empire, I would have much preferred Wookiees.


I think we all did, including Lucas, who was limited to the technology of the early 1980's. He could not get several dozen 7 foot people to act as Wookiees, so he decided to go with midgets (for whatever reason), and they would not have been technologically advanced as shown in Episode III. Don't get me wrong, I tink Empire is an amazing film, but I have always like Jedi better. Yes the ewoks are a huge deterrent, and the film would have been much better with Wookiees, or another setting altogether, but the Space Battle and scenes between Luke, Vader, and the Emperor are amazing.
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Re: the career of: George Lucas

Postby The Shadow » Thu Dec 17, 2015 1:34 am

I'm not sure if this has been mentioned before, I only stumbled across it somewhat recently but I think that especially with SW: The Force Awakens just about to go into full release that folks here might find Mike Klimo's Star Wars Ring Theory interesting and worthwhile reading.

http://www.starwarsringtheory.com/

RING THEORY: The Hidden Artistry of the Star Wars Prequels.

How George Lucas used an ancient technique called “ring composition” to reach a level of storytelling sophistication in his six-part saga that is unprecedented in cinema history.

By Mike Klimo


I've only just started reading it myself (kept putting it off) and find it pretty interesting and well presented. Klimo presents what ring composition is and pulls examples from the six Star Wars movies of how Lucas used ring composition to tell the story in episodes 1-6. So far, I've found Klimo's theory compelling, and it makes me wonder if J.J. Abrams understood Lucas's ring composition and if Abrams worked to preserve and continue the ring composition for SW:TFA.
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Re:

Postby mr.negativity » Thu May 16, 2019 10:16 am

swfreakjpb wrote:Oh Yeah Howard the Duck :? :shock: :puke:

Screen Rant:
Spoiler Below:
Endgame Officially Makes Howard The Duck an AVENGER


VARIETY DECEMBER 30, 2015:
George Lucas Says He Sold ‘Star Wars’ to ‘White Slavers’
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COLLIDER MAY 16, 2019:
Should the ‘Star Wars’ Prequels Be Remade?
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Re: 'Blockbuster'

Postby mr.negativity » Thu May 16, 2019 10:20 am

THR APRIL 11, 2019:
Steven Spielberg, George Lucas Early Years Detailed in New Podcast Series
Ryan Parker wrote:"We've created a time capsule to go back to the most exciting period of reinvention in Hollywood history and highlight the friendship that inspired it," says 'Blockbuster' series creator Matt Schrader.

Just in time for Star Wars Celebration, a new podcast is being released by the team of documentarians behind the award-winning Score: A Film Music Documentary that will tell the story of the iconic collaborative path between directors Steven Spielberg and George Lucas.

Blockbuster is a six-part series (a true story in scripted, biopic audio form) releasing Tuesday on Apple, Spotify and other podcast platforms.

"We've created a time capsule to go back to the most exciting period of reinvention in Hollywood history and highlight the friendship that inspired it," said filmmaker and series creator Matt Schrader.

Blockbuster is about the friendship and rivalry between a young Spielberg and Lucas, between 1973 and '77, when they both failed spectacularly in their careers before achieving monumental successes with Jaws and Star Wars and before their work together on Raiders of the Lost Ark, Schrader explained.

"Blockbuster shows the more intimate moments with George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, who kind of emerged fully formed onto the national scene in the 1970s," said Ray Chase, who voices George Lucas. "Their struggles as young people are really relatable to artists. It wasn't a done deal; there were a lot of setbacks that came into it. Every single episode of this series it seems like the whole thing is going to fall apart."

The team behind Blockbuster previously made the music doc Score (2016) and then the follow-up, Score: The Podcast.

"This is a true story, reconstructed from hundreds of sources and archival materials, and more than six months of research," said producer Kenny Holmes, who also voices Sylvester Stallone in the series.

Blockbuster will also highlight the directors' experience with up-and-coming composer John Williams after the sudden death of his wife, and his transformation that followed. The podcast will feature new music by award-winning composers Ryan Taubert and Benjamin Botkin, which weaves in original themes and stylings of Williams' earlier work, according to Schrader.

"It's a powerful story of following and fighting for dreams," Schrader said. "What struck me most: It taps all the same high points and devastating lows of a great mythological adventure. And based entirely on thousands of articles, books, documents and more, it's 100 percent true. Every detail references facts never before reconstructed to tell a narrative story of inspiration, failure and redemption."



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Hear George Lucas' First Screening of Star Wars as Recreated in a New Narrative Podcast Called Blockbuster
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Re: the career of: George Lucas

Postby mr.negativity » Sun May 19, 2019 9:44 pm

THR 11/30/2014:
'Star Wars: The Phantom Menace': THR's 1999 Review
On May 19, 1999, George Lucas unveiled his long-awaited prequel to his Star Wars trilogy in theaters. At the time, to call Episode I — The Phantom Menace highly anticipated would be doing a disservice to the concept of anticipation itself. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below:

By this point, there are few people left on the planet who won't experience a shiver of excitement upon seeing movie screens light up with the phrase "A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away," followed by the opening fanfare of John Williams' thrilling theme music. The promise of a new chapter in George Lucas' groundbreaking sci-fi saga has been greeted, by fans and the industry, with a rapturous fervor of near-religious proportions.

Sixteen years after Return of the Jedi comes the first installment of the new trilogy, for which expectation are nothing less than cosmic. Lucas, directing his first effort since the original Star Wars, has delivered a brilliant technical achievement, light years ahead of its forerunners in its computer-generated special effects, but a less emotionally resonant exercise likely to appeal most to younger viewers.

Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace seems designed more as a promotion for Lucasfilm's billion-dollar merchandising concerns than a meaningful chapter in the Star Wars canon. Hardcore fans are likely to be the most disappointed, but that won't stop them from lining up to see it again and again. While the film will do mega-blockbuster business — Lucas could perform the saga with shadow puppets and gross a few hundred million — it may not match its predecessors' long-term commercial appeal.

For those who just emerged from a coma and missed the massive publicity blitzkrieg, Phantom Menace takes place years before the original Star Wars and spotlights young Anakin Skywalker (Jake Lloyd), who will grow up to become Darth Vader. The complicated plot, which incorporates many themes and philosophical bromides of the first trilogy, centers on a conflict between the giant Trade Federation and small, peaceful planet Naboo, ruled by young Queen Amidala (Natalie Portman).

Attempting to restore peace are two Jedi Knights, master Qui-Gon Jinn (Liam Neeson) and his apprentice, young Obi-Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor). When Qui-Gon meets Anakin, who lives with his mother (Pernilla August) as a slave on planet Tatooine, he senses that the boy, to use Star Wars parlance, has the Force with him and is destined for great things. Qui-Gon resolves to train Anakin as a Jedi Knight, against the wishes of the Jedi Council; ever-wise Yoda (voice of Frank Oz), in particular, sees the troubles that lie ahead.

The new villain is shadowy Darth Maul (Ray Park), who displays an athletic style of fighting, and the primary alien sidekick is computer-animated Jar Jar Binks (voice of Ahmed Best), a cutesy, floppy-eared, amphibian-type creature who speaks in a thick, Caribbean-style patois.

Although fans are bound to debate the film's fine points ad infinitum, the story line ends up being less important than the set pieces. The opening credits have barely ended before the first lightsabers have been drawn, and the next two hours are filled with high-octane, intergalactic action.

Lucas and his crew at Industrial Light & Magic have outdone themselves in production design and special effects. Nearly every shot contains a complicated computer-generated effect, supplemented by the usual model work. The film displays one dazzling visual after another, from what seem like hundreds of types of photorealistic creatures to a multitude of elaborate scenic designs.

A lengthy pod-racing sequence uses many of the same techniques as the celebrated forest chase in Jedi, only more elaborate and skillful. And the climactic scenes, including an extended spaceship battle and a duel to the death between the two Jedi Knights and Darth Maul, are beautifully executed.

Williams' music, so important to the success of the original films, is suitably soaring, incorporating familiar themes as well as new elements like a haunting choral background during the final battle.

Less impressive are the human elements. Perhaps because Lucas' creation has been elevated to such pop-culture deification, Phantom Menace doesn't come close to the original trilogy's witty, self-consciously ironic tone. Instead, it vacillates between ponderous solemnity and a distressing tendency towards silly schtick. The original characters, not to mention the actors who played them, are sorely missed, with no one displaying the personality and flair of Luke, Han Solo or Princess Leia.

Rather, everyone seems oddly muted, as if overwhelmed by the pressure of their soon-to-be-iconic status. Neeson's Qui-Gon is a solid but semi-boring paternal figure, more a visual than emotional presence. McGregor, who possesses no shortage of charisma, is barely given anything to play, though he provides a skillful suggestion of the young Alec Guinness' vocal quality. Portman, as the Queen and her look-alike handmaiden, plays the former with Kabuki makeup and an undefinable accent and the latter in a conventional, not particularly enthralling fashion.

Lucas seems to have miscalculated placing so much emphasis on Lloyd, whose Anakin is a central figure; he even commandeers a fighter plane during the climactic space battle. Designed as an alter-ego for millions of children wishing to project themselves into the Star Wars universe, the character is unlikely to interest anyone much older than 13, and the child actor, though cute, isn't up to the task of carrying so much of the film.

For all of its years in gestation, Lucas' screenplay seems oddly underdeveloped and lacks the earlier trilogy's strong plot line and genuine wit. Whereas the original characters engaged in often-amusing, self-reflective banter, most of the humor here is infantile, revolving around the antics of aliens who use phrases like "big doo doo" and aren't shy about expelling gas. Jar Jar Binks, more suitable for Toys R Us than the big screen, is particularly egregious and far more irritating than endearing.

Truly damaging to the overall impact is the lack of a compelling villain. Darth Maul, whose black and orange visage seems ready-made for a Halloween mask, plays like Darth Vader lite. His is notable for his elaborate, kung fu-style moves while fighting with his dual-sided lightsaber.

The biggest audience response came with the reappearance of several familiar, beloved characters from the originals, including R2-D2 and C-3PO, the latter seen in a skeletal stage; a younger, more vibrant Yoda, who apparently developed his backward-speaking style earlier; and ever-popular Jabba the Hutt. We get to see the original meeting between the two beloved droids, but it's handled in decidedly low-key fashion. Cameo performances are delivered by Terence Stamp as a Senate head and a bald Samuel L. Jackson as a Jedi Council member.

Ultimately, it's hard to avoid feeling that Lucas has placed so much emphasis on outdoing himself technically that he lost sight of what made his original films so much fun. There will be those who respond enthusiastically to the stunning technical wizardry, but what has made Star Wars resonate so long in the public imagination is not its visual style — important as that is — but its ability to transport us to another dimension, to inform its imaginative, fantastic environments with rich humanism.

For his next two chapters, the supremely talented filmmaker may wish to spend less time working with computers and more dealing with the heart and soul of the mythical creation that has proven so seminal to today's pop culture. — Frank Scheck, originally published on May 10, 1999.



THR 11/30/2014:
'Star Wars: Attack of the Clones': THR's 2002 Review


THR 11/30/2014:
'Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith': THR's 2005 Review


THR MAY 19, 2019:
Why 'The Phantom Menace' Need Not Divide 'Star Wars' Fans
Richard Newby wrote:Sunday marks 20 years since George Lucas first returned to Star Wars with his first prequel Episode I: The Phantom Menace. Twenty years of criticism, hostility, and malice directed at a film said by many to be the lowest-point in the Star Wars franchise.

Twenty years of coming to terms with the fact that the film did not meet the lofty expectations that many fans of the original trilogy held onto for 16 years. Twenty years of fiercely protective love and community built around a film that’s director, principal performers, and fans have faced their share of blaster burns. Undoubtedly, the 20th anniversary of a film so divisive begets all kinds retrospectives tackling where the film went wrong and why it’s actually a misunderstood classic. But after 20 years of searching for answers behind the reaction, and arguing over the response to the film, those topics have been thoroughly wrung out. So what’s left to say on the 20th anniversary of one of pop culture’s most frequently discussed and hotly debated films? I can’t confidently argue that the film isn’t the weakest entry of the franchise. Nor would I say that it’s a film that fails to live up to the expectations that come with Star Wars. What I can say is that I got to experience Episode I: The Phantom Menace at the perfect age, and my reaction to fan-dominated stories, not just for Star Wars, was sealed because of it. This is how I stopped worrying and learned to love The Phantom Menace.

I was nine years old when The Phantom Menace was released, an age where there was no possibility of encountering spoilers, where trailers could only be seen in movie theaters, and reviews were moot. I was well acquainted with Star Wars at this point, having thoroughly watched and rewatched my VHS copies of A New Hope (1977), The Empire Strikes Back (1980) , and The Return of the Jedi (1983). I only became aware that a new Star Wars film was coming a few months prior to release when my mom brought home a copy of Time magazine that covered the film. It was there that I learned the term prequel, and that The Phantom Menace would begin a new trilogy following Anakin Skywalker’s descent into Darth Vader. For as often as I rewatched the VHS copies, I re-read that Time magazine, waiting for that May release date. I had no expectations for The Phantom Menace, no feelings about how Darth Vader’s story should be told, or what design or linguistic elements should be retained for the OT, all of those things that older fans became consumed by. For me, The Phantom Menace was simply another entry in a series I loved, a series that I’d only been aware of its existence for a few years. There was no sense of ownership, of being owed, of waiting for something to recapture the feeling of childhood. I was a child and Star Wars was Star Wars.

There was no disappointment felt after witnessing The Phantom Menace for the first time. I was in love with it. From the sheer awesomeness of Darth Maul and his double-bladed lightsaber, to seeing younger versions of familiar characters like Anakin Skywalker (Jake Lloyd), Obi-Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor), Yoda (Frank Oz), and the Emperor (Ian McDiarmid), the prequel film was a film experience unlike any I’d encountered before, a narrative building towards a story that had already been told. And the elements that have created so much of the negativity surrounding the film? Pod racing? Loved it. The over-use of CGI? Loved it. Jar Jar Binks? I bought the action figure. You couldn’t tell me The Phantom Menace was bad. I bought the toys, the video games, the VHS copy, the novelizations, and the guide books. I studied the film, compared it to A New Hope and looked for similarities between the two films. It would be years until I realized that the film had held a place of contempt for a different generation of Star Wars fans.

This is the part where I could tell you I was swayed by those voices of an older generation, that I came to recognize the disappointment The Phantom Menace represented. But that never happened. Yes, as a teenager and young adult I became aware of certain flaws – dialogue, tonal issues, and an over-reliance on green screen. But, coupled with the releases of Attack of the Clones (2002) and Revenge of the Sith (2005), I also became aware of the interesting political POV that Lucas had incorporated and the fallibility of the Jedi Order. The prequels were made by a filmmaker uninterested in repeating what he had already done, and as a result it expanded the Star Wars Universe in a way that kept me invested. I never learned to dislike The Phantom Menace for all of its flaws, because I had the opportunity to grow up with it, it’s sequels, and it’s footprint on the whole multimedia franchise. I valued Star Wars while recognizing that this was someone else’s story, one that’s telling I always took as a gift but never a possession.

Not for the first time, and surely not the last, the notion that the prequels films should be remade has risen again in the form of a petition. It comes in the midst of other unfortunately thought out petitions to remake Game of Thrones season eight, and recast the unofficially cast Robert Pattinson as Batman. These extreme reactions are silly, but they no doubt have their origins in the idea that The Phantom Menace should serve our fandom. There is a possessive nature to fandom’s response to these fictional worlds, these stories gifted to us by their tellers, that only stunts authorship and creativity. But no matter how many signatures exist on a petition, or how hard social media will try to convince us that something is universally hated, there is a whole generation of fans of who do and will see these stories differently, will embrace their flaws, and learn from them in order to tell better stories. Twenty years and maybe it’s time to let go of what The Phantom Menace could have or should have been, and view it as a story that belongs to the teller. Maybe that’s something all of fandom could consider.
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Re: Re:

Postby mr.negativity » Sat Oct 05, 2019 11:26 am

VARIETY DECEMBER 30, 2015:
George Lucas Says He Sold ‘Star Wars’ to ‘White Slavers’
Spoiler Below:
phpBB [media]



THR, SEPTEMBER 24, 2019:
Bob Iger Reveals George Lucas Felt "Betrayed" by Disney's 'Star Wars' Plans
Graeme McMillan wrote:While Disney's revival of the Star Wars franchise has been met with widespread success, one particularly influential figure wasn't on board with the creative choices made in creating the story of Rey, Kylo Ren et al: George Lucas, the man who created the franchise more than four decades ago.

The extent of Lucas' disappointment in the direction of the Star Wars franchise under Disney's control has been revealed via Disney CEO Bob Iger's memoir, The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned From 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company.

In the book, Iger explains that Disney purchased Lucas' outlines for three new movies when it made a deal to acquire Lucasfilm in 2012 — although that purchase was, in part, made out of a sense of obligation, it's suggested; "[W]e decided we needed to buy them," the chief exec writes of the decision made with studio head Alan Horn, "though we made clear in the purchase agreement that we would not be contractually obligated to adhere to the plot lines he'd laid out."

As it turned out, Disney and Lucasfilm didn't follow Lucas' lead for the new movies, a decision Lucas discovered when Lucasfilm head Kathleen Kennedy and Star Wars: The Force Awakens writers J.J. Abrams and Michael Arndt met to discuss the new trilogy, and specifically the 2015 installment.

"George immediately got upset as they began to describe the plot and it dawned on him that we weren't using one of the stories he submitted during the negotiations," Iger writes. "George knew we weren't contractually bound to anything, but he thought that our buying the story treatments was a tacit promise that we'd follow them, and he was disappointed that his story was being discarded. I'd been so careful since our first conversation not to mislead him in any way, and I didn't think I had now, but I could have handled it better."

Added the CEO: "George felt betrayed, and while this whole process would never have been easy for him, we'd gotten off to an unnecessarily rocky start."

Things didn't improve when Lucas saw the finished movie. Following a private screening, Iger recalls, Lucas "didn't hide his disappointment. 'There's nothing new,' he said. In each of the films in the original trilogy, it was important to him to present new worlds, new stories, new characters, and new technologies. In this one, he said, 'There weren't enough visual or technical leaps forward.' He wasn't wrong, but he also wasn't appreciating the pressure we were under to give ardent fans a film that felt quintessentially Star Wars."

The problem, Iger suggests, is that Lucas didn't fully appreciate what Lucasfilm and Disney were trying to do with the new trilogy, and specifically The Force Awakens. "We'd intentionally created a world that was visually and tonally connected to the earlier films, to not stray too far from what people loved and expected," Iger explains, "and George was criticizing us for the very thing we were trying to do."

In retrospect, Lucas' complaints mirror some of those from the vocal minority of Star Wars fandom upset about the direction the franchise has taken since Disney's purchase. While Iger stays away from agreeing with the criticisms in the book, in promoting its release, he has accepted that Disney's plan of releasing a new Star Wars movie every year might have hurt the property.

"I just think we might've put a little bit too much in the marketplace too fast," he told The New York Times in a profile published over the weekend, while adding, "I think the storytelling capabilities of [Lucasfilm] are endless because of the talent we have at the company, and the talent we have at the company is better than it's ever been, in part because of the influx of people from Fox."

A rep for Lucas told The Hollywood Reporter that the Star Wars creator had no comment on Iger's book.

The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned From 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company is available now from Random House.

io9, 12/31/15:
A Not-So-Brief History of George Lucas Talking **** About Disney’s Star Wars

Screen Rant:
Star Wars: Everything Revealed About George Lucas’ Opinion On The Disney Era
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Re: George “Maclunkey” Lucas

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Nov 14, 2019 5:59 pm

Vanity Fair, NOVEMBER 12, 2019:
George Lucas Himself Gave Greedo the Last Word in Controversial New Star Wars Edit
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COLLIDER:
That Disney+ “Maclunkey” Edit to ‘Star Wars’ Came Courtesy of George Lucas
VINNIE MANCUSO wrote:What even is Maclunkey, besides a fantastic name for a band who only plays ska covers of Mos Eisley Cantina songs? (Dibs.) Writer Bryan Young might have cracked the case by diving back into Lucas’ Star Wars prequels, where he noticed "OH GODZILLA! WHAT TERRIBLE LANGUAGE!" podracer Sebulba appears to have spoken the line to Anakin Skywalker (Jake Lloyd) in The Phantom Menace. Translated from Sebulba’s Huttese, it means “This’ll be the end of you.”
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Re: the career of: George Lucas

Postby lhb412 » Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:10 am

MACLUNKEY! MACLUNKEY! MACLUNKEY!
(The girl who's hard to get)
MACLUNKEY! MACLUNKEY! MACLUNKEY!
(But you can win her yet)
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