Disney News Thread

King Kong! Star Trek! The Lord of the Rings! Hellraiser! Star Wars! The Marvel Cinematic Universe! The Universal Monsters! Freddy and Jason! The Dead Trilogy! The DC Cinematic Universe! Battlestar Galactica! Hammer Films! Gorgo! The range of Western Sci-Fi, Horror, and Fantasy Movies and Television programs span the scope of the imagination; this is the forum to discuss them!

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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Feb 14, 2019 4:53 pm

Deadline February 14, 2019:
Disney’s ‘Pirates’ Reboot Uncertain As ‘Deadpool’ Writers Jump Ship
Geoff Boucher wrote:EXCLUSIVE: Disney film production chief Sean Bailey’s effort to retool and relaunch the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise is back in uncertain waters after the defection of Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick, the hot-shot writing team behind Fox’s mighty Deadpool franchise.

Disney insiders say Reese & Wernick are no longer working on a sixth installment in the swashbuckler series that has grossed $4.5 billion in worldwide box office and $2.5 billion more in global merchandise since it first set sail in 2003. The films have all been built around Johnny Depp’s antics as the bleary buccaneer Jack Sparrow, but the actor’s recent travails and steep salary prompted Bailey to consider a new course for Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures and its flagship brand.

Bailey’s new direction began with the October hiring of Reese & Wernick, who are viewed as tone-savvy specialists in subversive action comedy after the success of the Deadpool series (which has posted the two largest opening weekends by R-rated films in Hollywood history) and Sony’s Zombieland (which celebrates its 10th anniversary with a sequel this October).

Bailey has been vocal in his excitement about the hiring, telling reporters and colleagues that the scribes were going to “make Pirates punk rock again” and give the franchise a much-needed “kick in the pants” that would revive the off-kilter charisma the brand exuded in its early days. Those high hopes faded in recent weeks.

Disney insiders are divided about what happens next. Some say a search is already underway for viable replacement options, others say the once-proud flagship of Disney’s live-action fleet may be headed to dry-dock for good.

The glory days for the swashbuckler series were more than a decade ago. The franchise matched The Lord Of The Rings series by finishing back-to-back years with the No. 1 film in global box office (At World’s End in 2006, Dead Man’s Chest in 2007), each taking in north of $950 million. The plunder has been more modest in recent years. The latest release was in 2017 with Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man Tell No Tales, a $230 million production that showed the brand’s international traction ($622 million in foreign markets) is far stronger than its domestic standing ($173 million).

Interestingly, there has been some spitball discussions about revamping the property for a Pirates of the Caribbean television series, but the budgetary and logistical challenges of a seafaring series may be too daunting. That small-screen tack wouldn’t be of any help to Bailey, whose moviemaking division needs major firepower just to keep up with its in-house competition (Marvel, Pixar, Lucasfilm and Walt Disney Animation Studios). Since taking the reins in 2010, Bailey’s division has delivered one $1 billion-dollar performer (2017’s live-action Beauty and the Beast).


What Made the Disney Renaissance Era so Special?
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Mar 12, 2019 10:26 am

THR 3/12/2019:
Disney's Fox Acquisition Expected to Close Next Week

Deadline March 12, 2019:
Disney Sets March 20 Closing Date For 21st Century Fox Acquisition
Denise Petski and Dade Hayes wrote:Disney has set a March 20 closing date for the acquisition of 21st Century Fox.

The date was included in a release in which Disney indicated that the company has received the last major approval for the deal from regulators in Mexico. According to Disney, 21st Century Fox shareholders will have until Thursday to choose the amount of cash and Disney stock to receive in the $71.3 billion transaction.

Disney said the acquisition is expected to become effective at 12:02 a.m. Eastern Time on March 20, 2019. 21st Century Fox shareholders will receive a mix of cash and stock valued at $38 a share in the deal.

The $71.3 billion price increased considerably from the $52.4 billion Fox had originally accepted in December 2017. Comcast, whose CEO, Brian Roberts, has never forgotten having his unsolicited offer for Disney spurned back in 2004, forced Disney to raise its bid when it came in with a higher offer for Fox. At the same time they were jockeying over the Fox assets, the companies were also battling for European pay-TV giant Sky, with Comcast ultimately prevailing in a $40 billion consolation prize once it bowed out of the Fox bidding.
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Mar 12, 2019 12:13 pm

Forbes Mar 12, 2019:
Every Single Disney Movie Will Be Available For Streaming On Disney+
Anna Ben Yehuda Rahmanan wrote:As previously announced, Disney is gearing up to launch its very own streaming service, Disney+, by the end of this year. The launch will be accompanied by the official opening of the famous "Disney vault."

Since the 1920, the company has released all their productions as home videos available for purchase for a limited time only before putting them back "in the vault" until a re-release date years later. That will no longer be the case.

During a recent investor meeting in St. Louis, Walt Disney Company CEO Bob Iger announced the end of the marketing gimmick, letting the public know that Disney's entire library of offerings will be readily available for streaming on the new service.


"The service, which I mentioned earlier is going to launch later in the year, is going to combine what we call library product, movies, and television, with a lot of original product as well, movies and television," said Iger. "And at some point fairly soon after launch it will house the entire Disney motion picture library, so the movies that you speak of that traditionally have been kept in a 'vault' and brought out basically every few years will be on the service. And then, of course, we’re producing a number of original movies and original television shows as well that will be Disney-branded." All new films by Disney, including the recent Captain Marvel, will also be available for streaming within a year of their release in theaters.

Of course, the new scheme will ensure that folks looking to gain access to the likes of Dumbo, Snow White and The Little Mermaid will subscribe to Disney+. The network's ability to retain those subscribers will likely fall on the quality of the original programs on offer.
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby canofhumdingers » Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:16 pm

I wonder if e really means what he says when he speaks of the “entire Disney motion picture library”... I’m looking at you Song of the South!
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby O.Supreme » Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:53 pm

canofhumdingers wrote:I wonder if e really means what he says when he speaks of the “entire Disney motion picture library”... I’m looking at you Song of the South!


I'm not sure if it was in the UK, or Australia, but that film was officially released somewhere...it is the source for pretty much all bootleg copies in existence. Also I'm probably one of few members here who can actually remember seeing that in the theater in 1980. Apparently it had one final release in 1986, but I don't remember seeing it then, This was about the time when Disney started releasing films on VHS for the first time. It was probably intended for a VHS release in 87 or 88, but its problematic nature ensured that it never happened, at least in North America. But Disneyland got a super-cool theme park ride out of it :wink:
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Re: The Disney-Fox Acquisition

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:31 am

/film Tuesday, March 19th, 2019:
The Disney-Fox Acquisition Has Been Completed, Announces 21st Century Fox
Hoai-Tran Bui wrote:Nearly two years after Disney’s multi-billion dollar deal to acquire key entertainment assets from 21st Century Fox was announced, the Disney-Fox acquisition has been completed to the tune of $71.3 billion. The acquisition wil become effective at 12:02 a.m. Eastern Time March 20, 2019.


21st Century Fox announced that the long-standing deal for the Walt Disney Company to acquire its key assets, including the 20th Century Fox film and TV studio, Fox’s entertainment cable networks, and its international assets, has been completed. Read 21st Century Fox’s statement below:


21ST CENTURY FOX:
21ST CENTURY FOX ANNOUNCES COMPLETION OF DISTRIBUTION IN CONNECTION WITH DISNEY ACQUISITION
NEW YORK, New York, March 19, 2019 – Twenty-First Century Fox, Inc. (“21CF”) (NASDAQ: TFCFA, TFCF) announced that it has today completed the distribution of all issued and outstanding shares of Fox Corporation (“FOX”) common stock to 21CF stockholders (other than holders of the shares held by subsidiaries of 21CF) on a pro rata basis (the “Distribution”). 21CF and FOX are now each a standalone, publicly traded company. FOX Class A common stock and FOX Class B common stock are now listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market (“Nasdaq”) under the symbols “FOXA” and “FOX,” respectively. 21CF Class A common stock and 21CF Class B common stock, which were formerly listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “FOXA” and “FOX,” respectively, are now listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “TFCFA” and “TFCF,” respectively.

The Walt Disney Company’s (“Disney”) acquisition of 21CF will become effective at 12:02 a.m. Eastern Time tomorrow, March 20, 2019.

Cautionary Notes on Forward Looking Statements
This communication contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the federal securities laws, including Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. In this context, forward-looking statements often address expected future business and financial performance and financial condition, and often contain words such as “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “seek,” “see,” “will,” “would,” “target,” similar expressions, and variations or negatives of these words. Forward-looking statements by their nature address matters that are, to different degrees, uncertain, such as statements about the consummation of the proposed transaction and the anticipated benefits thereof. These and other forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future results and are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements, including the failure to consummate the proposed transaction or to make any filing or take other action required to consummate such transaction in a timely matter or at all, are not guarantees of future results and are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. Important risk factors that may cause such a difference include, but are not limited to: (i) the risk that the anticipated tax treatment of the transaction is not obtained, (ii) an increase or decrease in the anticipated transaction taxes (including due to any changes to tax legislation and its impact on tax rates (and the timing of the effectiveness of any such changes)) to be paid in connection with the separation prior to the closing of the transactions could cause an adjustment to the number of shares of TWDC Holdco 613 Corp. (“New Disney”), a new holding company that will become a parent of both Disney and 21CF, and the cash amount to be paid to holders of 21CF’s common stock, (iii) potential litigation relating to the proposed transaction that could be instituted against 21CF, Disney or their respective directors, (iv) potential adverse reactions or changes to business relationships resulting from the completion of the transactions, (v) risks associated with third party contracts containing consent and/or other provisions that may be triggered by the proposed transaction, (vi) negative effects of the consummation of the transaction on the market price of 21CF’s common stock, Disney’s common stock and/or New Disney’s common stock, (vii) risks relating to the value of the New Disney shares to be issued in the transaction and uncertainty as to the long-term value of New Disney’s common stock, (viii) the potential impact of unforeseen liabilities, future capital expenditures, revenues, expenses, earnings, synergies, economic performance, indebtedness, financial condition and losses on the future prospects, business and management strategies for the management, expansion and growth of New Disney’s operations after the consummation of the transaction and on the other conditions to the completion of the Acquisition, (ix) the risks and costs associated with, and the ability of New Disney to, integrate the businesses successfully and to achieve anticipated synergies, (x) the risk that disruptions from the proposed transaction will harm 21CF’s or Disney’s business, including current plans and operations, (xi) the ability of 21CF or Disney to retain and hire key personnel, (xii) adverse legal and regulatory developments or determinations or adverse changes in, or interpretations of, U.S., Australian or other foreign laws, rules or regulations, including tax laws, rules and regulations, that could delay or prevent completion of the proposed transactions or cause the terms of the proposed transactions to be modified, (xiii) as well as management’s response to any of the aforementioned factors.

These risks, as well as other risks associated with the proposed transactions, are more fully discussed in the updated joint proxy statement/prospectus included in the registration statement on Form S-4 of New Disney that was filed in connection with the transaction. While the list of factors presented here and in the updated joint proxy statement/prospectus included in the Form S-4 are considered representative, no such list should be considered to be a complete statement of all potential risks and uncertainties. Unlisted factors may present significant additional obstacles to the realization of forward looking statements. Consequences of material differences in results as compared with those anticipated in the forward-looking statements could include, among other things, business disruption, operational problems, financial loss, legal liability to third parties and similar risks, any of which could have a material adverse effect on 21CF’s, Disney’s or New Disney’s consolidated financial condition, results of operations, credit rating or liquidity. Neither 21CF, Disney nor New Disney assume any obligation to publicly provide revisions or updates to any forward looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, should circumstances change, except as otherwise required by securities and other applicable laws.

Media Contacts:

21st Century Fox:

Nathaniel Brown
nbrown@21cf.com
(212) 852-7746

Investor Contacts:

21st Century Fox:

Reed Nolte
rnolte@21cf.com
(212) 852-7092

Mike Petrie
mpetrie@21cf.com
(212) 852-7130
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Re: The Disney-Fox Acquisition

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Mar 19, 2019 5:47 pm

Deadline March 19, 2019:
Disney-Fox Deal: Per-Share Value Set, Bob Iger Hails “Historic Moment”
Dade Hayes wrote:Hours before their asset combination closes, Disney and Fox released the per-share value of the deal and offered a final blessing by Disney CEO Bob Iger, who called the deal “an extraordinary and historic moment for us.”

Disney’s $71 billion acquisition of most of 21st Century Fox becomes official at 12:02AM ET. Today, the slimmed-down, TV-centric concern officially known as Fox Corp. began trading on the NASDAQ, slipping 3% in its first outing.

After the close of trading, the two companies announced the per-share value of the merger will be $51.572626. That means each share of 21st Century Fox common stock will be exchanged for $51.572626 in cash or 0.4517 shares of common stock of the holding company that will own both Disney and the Fox assets being acquired.

isney’s stock price, which was steady through the day, plunged in the final hour of trading to finish at $110, down nearly 3%. It has largely remained steady in the months since Disney and Fox shareholders approved the transaction last July 27. After proposing the deal in December 2017, stunning many observers who had no inkling that the Murdochs would consider selling off Fox entertainment assets, Disney then outdueled Comcast in a bidding war for Fox. Comcast wound up with full control of pay-TV giant Sky.

“This is an extraordinary and historic moment for us—one that will create significant long-term value for our company and our shareholders,” said Robert A. Iger, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, The Walt Disney Company. “Combining Disney’s and 21st Century Fox’s wealth of creative content and proven talent creates the preeminent global entertainment company, well positioned to lead in an incredibly dynamic and transformative era.”

Disney is also acquiring approximately $19.8 billion of cash and assuming approximately $19.2 billion of debt of 21st Century Fox in the acquisition.

The acquisition is expected to be accretive to Disney earnings per share before the impact of purchase accounting for the second fiscal year after the close of the transaction. It will yield at least $2 billion in cost synergies by 2021 from operating efficiencies realized through the combination of businesses, the company predicts.
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Re: The Disney-Fox Deal

Postby mr.negativity » Wed Mar 20, 2019 11:54 am

THR MARCH 20, 2019:
Disney Closes $71.3 Billion Fox Deal, Creating Global Content Powerhouse

THR MARCH 20, 2019:
With Fox Deal Closed, Disney Now Has TV Studio Filled With All-Stars

THR MARCH 20, 2019:
Disney-Fox's Combined Film Calendar Is a Box Office Death Star
Pamela McClintock wrote:Just like that, Disney's movie studio has doubled its calendar for 2019.

In closing its historic $71.3 billion acquisition of a large swatch of 21st Century Fox, the House that Walt built has inherited 20th Century Fox film, Fox 2000 and Oscar powerhouse Fox Searchlight. The deal was finalized just past midnight ET on Wednesday.

The merger gives Disney dominion over James Cameron's Avatar franchise, the Kingsman series and the X-Men universe, which will now be guided by Kevin Feige's Marvel Studios. Avatar 2 has a plum year-end release date of Dec. 18, 2020.

The nuptials also give Disney — known for all-audience tentpoles — access to a diverse slate of adult dramas and specialty titles, including James Mangold's untitled Ford v. Ferrari film, starring Christian Bale and Matt Damon, and Joe Wright's The Woman in the Window, starring Amy Adams and Julianne Moore.

Taking over the marketing and distribution of the various Fox movies will be a complicated task. Disney has 10 movies dated for release between now and New Year's Day — many believe it will be the studio's biggest year ever — while Fox likewise has 10 (and that doesn't include Searchlight titles).

Don't be surprised if some Fox titles move. James Gray's sci-fi epic Ad Astra, starring Brad Pitt, is set to fly into theaters May 24, the same date that Disney's Aladdin debuts. Nearly two months out, almost no marketing materials have been released for Astra. That's in sharp contrast to Pitt's other summer movie, Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

Fox's Call of the Wild, starring Harrison Ford and Dan Stevens, is slotted to sled into theaters Dec. 25, just five days after Disney and Lucasfilm's untitled Star Wars: Episode IX blasts off Dec. 20. While there's certainly room for more than one movie at Christmas, opening two movies so near to each other that are from one studio could prompt a switch for Call of the Wild.

"How will Disney treat marketing for films which launch near each other," asks Wall Street analyst Eric Handler of MKM partners, "especially if they go after similar demographics?"

Mangold's Ford v. Ferrari movie, set to open in the heart of awards season on Nov. 15, is among the films that 20th Century film vice chair Emma Watts is taking with her to Disney, where she'll keep the same title. Peter Chernin's Chernin Entertainment, a producer on the film, is shifting its film deal to Disney as well.

The Woman in the Window (Oct. 4), produced by Scott Rudin, is from Fox 2000, headed by Elizabeth Gabler, who is joining Disney. Fox 2000 has The Art of Racing this year as well on Sept. 27.

Searchlight — whose co-chiefs, Steve Gilula and Nancy Utley, are likewise going to Disney — has only one film dated so far for 2019, Tolkien (May 10), and hasn't yet announced the release plans for Lucy in the Sky, starring Natalie Portman.

Disney's remaining calendar for the year includes Dumbo (March 29), DisneyNature's Penguins (April 17), Avengers: Endgame (April 26), Toy Story 4 (June 21), The Lion King (July 19), Artemis Fowl (Aug. 9), Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (Oct. 18) and Frozen 2 (Nov. 22).

Fox's 2019 slate includes the faith-based film Breakthrough (April 17), X-Men spinoff Dark Phoenix (June 7), Stuber (July 12) and New Mutants (Aug. 2), which could also be relocated, and the animated pic Spies in Disguise, voiced by Will Smith and Tom Holland (Sept. 13).

Disney has yet to announce exactly when it will begin marketing and distributing Fox movies (it wasn't allowed to rearrange scheduling until the merger closed). It's also unclear whether some movies will directly go to Disney+, the new streaming service that launches later this year.

In regard to Fox's 2020, Matthew Vaughn's Kingsman prequel was recently pushed back from November 2019 to Feb. 14, 2020, while 20th Century Fox's Ryan Reynolds comedy Free Guys has been dated for July 3. (Reynolds is also developing the next iteration of the Deadpool series.) And Fox's Murder on the Orient Express follow-up Death of the Nile is set for Oct. 3, 2020.

High-profile Fox projects that are likely to be ready for 2020 include Steven Spielberg's West Side Story, which is set to begin shooting this year. And Cameron's next three Avatar movies following the 2020 sequel have release dates of Dec. 17, 2021, Dec. 20, 2024, and Dec. 19, 2025, respectively.

In 2018, Disney commanded 26 percent of market share at the box office. That's sure to zoom past last year, based on the strength of the studio's slate and the acquisition of Fox.
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Re: The Disney-Fox Deal

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Mar 21, 2019 1:06 pm

THR 3/21/2019:
Disney Film Chief Alan Horn Tells Fox Staff to Expect "Quite a Bit of Change"
Pamela McClintock wrote:More than 3,000 people work at the Fox film studio, and widespread layoffs are expected.

Walt Disney Studios chairman Alan Horn and his top lieutenant, Alan Bergman, sent a note early Thursday morning to all of their new employees working across the 20th Century Fox film empire.

"Although there is much to look forward to, we know this integration will entail quite a bit of change across our organizations. We want to acknowledge that and assure you we are committed to engaging in this process thoughtfully and communicating changes as we are able – most importantly with respect for all involved," the duo wrote.

The memo came a day after Disney's historic acquisition of much of 21st Century Fox closed, giving Horn purview over the film labels that make up 20th Century Fox.

More than 3,000 people work at the Fox film studio, and widespread layoffs are expected.

On Wednesday, Horn and Walt Disney Studios president Alan Bergman traveled to the Fox lot in Century city to meet with 20th Century Fox film vice chairman Emma Watts, Fox 2000 chief Elizabeth Gabler and Fox Searchlight co-chairmen Steve Gilula and Nancy Utley, all of whom have joined Disney.

Horn and team will now going about the complicated task of taking over the Fox film slate, which has 10 titles set for release this year (don't be surprised if some titles move.)


Read Horn and Bergman's memo in full below.

With the announcement that the Disney-Fox deal is officially complete, we begin an exciting new chapter in the history of both our companies and the industry. This is a major piece of the bold strategy Bob Iger has set for The Walt Disney Company as our business rapidly evolves.

It’s astounding and humbling to consider the rich, dynamic legacies of these storied studios and the endless possibilities ahead as we unite them. It’s not something we take for granted as leaders, and we are looking forward to working together to build a team of unparalleled creativity and innovation.

We’ve learned a lot in meetings held prior to deal close, yet there are many things that could not be discussed for regulatory reasons. We are happy to now have the chance to really understand and share how we operate at the ground level – and we realize we are only at the beginning of the process.

Although there is much to look forward to, we know this integration will entail quite a bit of change across our organizations. We want to acknowledge that and assure you we are committed to engaging in this process thoughtfully and communicating changes as we are able – most importantly with respect for all involved.

We’ll be making announcements very soon about our senior leadership structure. It will take some time to reach our future fully integrated state. Day-to-day, our top priorities remain the same: to support the great content we’re creating and deliver a superb experience to our consumers, and to continue to build an inspiring, inclusive environment where employees can bring their best to work every day.

As we start this journey of bringing together the combined might of Disney and 21st Century Fox to create the best entertainment studio, we’d like to thank you all for everything you’ve done to bring us to this point and for your continued focus, support, and patience as we proceed.

Sincerely,

Alan Horn

Chairman, The Walt Disney Studios

Alan Bergman
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby Benjamin Haines » Thu Mar 21, 2019 6:08 pm

It begins...

Deadline, 03/21/2019:
Elizabeth Gabler’s Fox 2000 To Shutter As Disney Takes Over
Mike Fleming Jr wrote:EXCLUSIVE: In a surprise move, sources said that Disney will be shuttering the Fox 2000 label run by Elizabeth Gabler. It was believed that Gabler, who made a slew of mid-budget elegant tastemaker films, would continue to lead the executive team who make up her label, but sources said that isn’t going to be the case.

Gabler’s division would seem a strong fit for a hybrid making pictures for theatrical and streaming. Her highlights include Hidden Figures, The Fault In Our Stars, The Devil Wears Prada, Marley & Me, Love, Simon and The Hate U Give.

This is a surprise, given that Disney announced Gabler’s label would continue. Things looked less rosy this week, when the Disney execs held a meeting with the various Fox film presidents and Gabler wasn’t included in that meeting. Fox 2000 has six executives under her as well as assistants.


Deadline, 03/21/2019:
Fox International Distribution President Andrew Cripps Also Out As Part Of Disney-Fox Merger

Deadline, 03/21/2019:
Fox Worldwide Film Marketing Chiefs, Chief Content Officer Out Amid Disney Layoffs

Deadline, 03/21/2019:
Fox Television President Greg Meidel Out As Disney-Fox Layoffs Continue

Deadline, 03/21/2019:
Fox Domestic Distribution Boss Chris Aronson Among First Post-Merger Exec Layoffs; EVP Spencer Klein Also Out
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Re: The Disney-Fox Deal

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Mar 21, 2019 7:33 pm

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Deadline, 03/21/2019:
Fox Film Team Faces Rocky Disney Future; Paul Feig Moves Label To Universal
Mike Fleming Jr wrote:EXCLUSIVE: The beleaguered film staff of the various divisions of Fox had to know they would be in for a hellish Thursday when they walked through the gold doors of Building 88 to their offices and noticed something different. The 20th Century Fox logo stenciled on the doors was gone. It was replaced by the blue Fox logo that signifies the part of the company that was kept by Rupert Murdoch and led by his son Lachlan. Talk about an omen.

Now, the Murdochs own the lot and they control the space even if they did lease office space to Disney because the Mouse House isn’t big enough to absorb those film and TV staffers who will be left after the bloodletting that began today. And Fox execs couldn’t help but notice that lady who came to those offices awhile ago with a tape measure, sizing up the place. I’m told that Lachlan and James Murdoch feel sentimental toward Building 88 because that was where they played when their father Rupert had offices there when he was in town.

But for movie purists, Building 88 also has some serious film roots that go all the way back to Daryl Zanuck and David O. Selznick. Like with everything else today, it was hard to get definitive answers on anything, but many felt that Fox film execs might well be shunted elsewhere on the lot.

The day would only get worse, especially when Fox 2000 surprisingly was shuttered, this after Disney previously affirmed that Elizabeth Gabler was going to continue to run her tastemaker label, whose output ranged from The Devil Wears Prada to The Fault In Our Stars and Hidden Figures. Throw in the layoffs of well-respected distribution head Chris Aronson, consumer products head Jim Fielding and several others, and this was on course to become an exceptionally "OH GODZILLA! WHAT TERRIBLE LANGUAGE!" day at the studio.

There has to be some solace, that the bad news started to be delivered so soon after this week’s lot visits by Disney’s Alan Horn and Alan Bergman. But it has been awful for those who run or are part of the film staffs of the 20th Century Fox, Fox 2000, Fox Family, Blue Sky and Fox Searchlight labels. Everyone knows that by the time the bloodletting is over, upwards of 5000 might be gone as Disney tries to meets its stated goal to pare $2 billion in consolidation costs. The question is how that will impact the executives and producers who’ve been putting together movie slates under the Fox label for years.

Particularly since the output of films is expected to be low. For instance 20th, which has been making a full-size slate of pictures since The Depression, might only be able to make four theatrical films and four streaming films per year, if the rumors I am hearing are true.

The Fox 2000 shocker was a torpedo blow and it’s inevitable that the cultures of those Fox divisions built by Emma Watts (Logan and Planet of the Apes), Steve Gilula/Nancy Utley (The Shape of Water), Vanessa Morrison (Bob’s Burgers) and Blue Sky’s Andrea Miloro and Robert Baird (Ice Age) will be challenged if not destroyed. Disney doesn’t make a lot of first-look deals but Fox certainly did. It’s an open question how many of those will be needed, or even how many production executives will be necessary once Disney is done cherry picking assets to supplement its already booming theatrical slates and to feed its streaming services Hulu and Disney+. Disney-based producers already had a hard time in securing the few slots that aren’t devoted to Marvel, Pixar, Star Wars and family-friendly live-action remakes of animated classics. Imagine trying to crack the slate if you are an outsider. Some execs left Fox over the past few months while others hung in hoping they can continue their careers or else receive generous settlements that will give them time to find new jobs.

20th alone has six production executives and a slew of producer deals that include Chernin Entertainment, Scott Free, Ben Affleck & Matt Damon’s Pearl Street, Noah Hawley, DeVon Franklin, Boom! Studios, Hutch Parker, 21 Laps, Simon Kinberg and Lauren Shuler Donner’s The Donners Company, and James Mangold. Given that Fox itself is expected to be truncated to as little as four theatrical and that many streaming titles, how many execs and producers will be needed to manage that output? And will the talent in films designed to be theatrical releases with back-end potential be satisfied with being relegated to Hulu, where the upside on such films won’t be nearly as attractive?

One tenured Fox filmmaker who is moving on is Paul Feig, who years ago signed a deal to develop R-rated comedies for Fox — those won’t fly at family friendly Disney — and where he made comedy blockbusters The Heat and Spy. I’ve confirmed that Feig’s deal has lapsed and he is in the process of moving his FeigCo label from Fox to Universal. The move isn’t a shock, as Feig just wrapped a film for Uni, the Emma Thompson- and Byrony Kimmings-scripted Last Christmas with Emilia Clarke and Henry Golding. He’s also developing a few other projects at the studio including one with Eva Longoria called 24-7, a workplace comedy he’s producing with Kerry Washington and Ben Spector, and the comedy False Alarm, which he’s producing with Dylan Clark and Sam Esmail.

Fox’s loss is Universal’s gain. Universal Pictures president Peter Cramer confirmed the deal: “Paul is one of the most distinctive and versatile filmmakers working today, and we are thrilled to welcome him, Jessie Henderson, and the FeigCo team back to Universal. We know they will add to their impressive track record of creating successful films for global audiences that are full of Paul’s signature joy, wit, and heart, starting with Last Christmas in November.”

While uncertainty abounds, other producers seem a firmer fit into Disney. Chernin seems secure; 21 Laps makes Disney-esque movies like Free Guy, the Ryan Reynolds-starrer that is expected to be a Disney tentpole for 2021. Ridley Scott’s Scott Free seems also a good bet to stay: beyond the next Aliens installment that he’s working on, Scott is expected to next direct Merlin, a live-action movie on the formative years of the wizard, for Disney.

Whether it is the current acrimony between the Writers Guild and the agencies, or how the future of Disney has been calculated, Hollywood is ruled by television. For a film guy like myself, it has been cruel, watching Fox’s TV heads be an inclusive part of the discussions of the future, while the feature folks who used to puff out their chests on the lot have essentially been forced into the position of being told their fate.

We’ve known for some time that film chief Stacey Snider won’t be part of the Disney future, even though she has been in her office this week. Watts has long been known as a very strong executive, and several have said she is about the only one there who has been clued in on the Disney plans. Does she have the clout to prevent Fox film properties from being repurposed as TV projects or as streaming projects on Hulu and Disney+ with low budgets and no back-ends? Sources said that in the recent past she fended off an attempt by Hawley and FX to take the Aliens franchise and turn it into a miniseries, and when Searchlight once wanted to do something with The Omen, she held fast because who wants to give up your franchises? She did that before the Disney deal, when it was a whole different ballgame.

What will happen to inventive projects like the three-picture reinvention of Alien Nation with director Jeff Nichols, or the drama that Affleck was going to direct and Damon to star in, based on the true story of the ex-cop who rigged the McDonald’s Monopoly game and allegedly stole $24 million, with a script by Deadpool‘s Rheese & Wernick? The decision on all of these will come down to Disney’s Horn, who will hold the greenlight power going forward.


CBR Dec 08, 2017:
Disney Could End Up Owning A Piece of Batman History
Tim Webber wrote:If Disney's Fox acquisition goes through, the exact status of Batman '66 becomes somewhat unclear. Since the full details of any deals between Fox and the WB aren't common knowledge, there's no telling what kind of clauses could direct Batman's future from the depths of fine print. Before or after the acquisition actually happens, Fox or Disney might be interested in selling Batman back to the WB to avoid future rights headaches. For the WB, Batman would certainly be an attractive piece of content to have on its upcoming DC Entertainment streaming service, if they don't already own the show's streaming rights.

From Disney's point of view, there's probably not much it can do with the Batman rights without the WB's cooperation. Since Disney would presumably inherit Fox's syndication rights and the rights to Batman: The Movie, the corporation could probably squeeze a little bit of money out of the show. Depending on whether or not Disney ends up with the digital distribution rights to Batman and Batman: The Movie, that could, ironically, give Batman a digital home alongside Marvel's heroes on Disney's much-hyped upcoming streaming service.

If Fox or Disney decide to hold on to the Batman rights, it's not necessarily the end of the world for the WB. In the decades that DC downplayed Adam West's Batman, the Dark Knight overtook Superman to become pop culture's most prominent superhero. Depending on the nature of the licensing agreement between Fox and the WB, the Batman '66 toys and comics could come to an end after a Disney acquisition. Since younger generations have stronger connections to later incarnations of Batman, it wouldn't be too surprising if the groovy Caped Crusader of the 1960s already had an increasingly less meaningful role in the WB's future plans for Batman.

It's also worth noting that Disney, Fox and Warner all have stakes in the streaming service Hulu. Regardless of whether or not Disney's Fox acquisition happens, all of Batman's rights-holders already have a vested interest in the service. If the show comes to streaming anytime in the immediate future, Hulu could be well-positioned to become Batman's streaming home.

Even though the Fox broadcast network isn't part of the Disney deal, the Batman TV rights that include Gotham could come into play too. If Fox wants or needs to sell its claim to the 1960s Batman show, the Batman TV rights could be included as a way to make it more enticing for the WB. On the other hand, the live-action Batman rights could become one of the biggest assets the Fox Broadcasting Company has left after Fox's acquisition. In that case, Gotham and any other potential Batman shows could take on a new prominence in the network's future schedules.

Assuming that Disney's Fox acquisition goes through, the future of a long-canceled Batman show is a small piece of an impossibly large, complex puzzle that could dramatically change the entertainment landscape. From its early days as an unlikely pop culture phenomenon to its long-awaited home release, Batman has beaten the odds. If Batman's TV rights force Disney and the WB to come to the table, it could open up a line of dialogue that makes crossovers between Marvel and DC's superheroes a possibility in comics or on film. While that's admittedly unlikely, Batman has already distinguished itself as the little show that could do seemingly impossible things, no matter who owns it.
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby The Shadow » Fri Mar 22, 2019 11:36 pm

It's like the House of Mouse just had to carry out their own version of the Black Dinner ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Douglas#Black_Dinner ) (It's the historical event that the Red Wedding was based on).
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:14 pm

Benjamin Haines wrote:It begins...

Deadline, 03/21/2019:
Elizabeth Gabler’s Fox 2000 To Shutter As Disney Takes Over
Mike Fleming Jr wrote:EXCLUSIVE: In a surprise move, sources said that Disney will be shuttering the Fox 2000 label run by Elizabeth Gabler. It was believed that Gabler, who made a slew of mid-budget elegant tastemaker films, would continue to lead the executive team who make up her label, but sources said that isn’t going to be the case.

Gabler’s division would seem a strong fit for a hybrid making pictures for theatrical and streaming. Her highlights include Hidden Figures, The Fault In Our Stars, The Devil Wears Prada, Marley & Me, Love, Simon and The Hate U Give.

This is a surprise, given that Disney announced Gabler’s label would continue. Things looked less rosy this week, when the Disney execs held a meeting with the various Fox film presidents and Gabler wasn’t included in that meeting. Fox 2000 has six executives under her as well as assistants.



THR 3/27/2019:
Fox 2000's Elizabeth Gabler Courted by Paramount, Sony
Tatiana Siegel wrote:On the afternoon of March 20, Fox 2000 president Elizabeth Gabler was summoned to a conference room on the Fox lot, where Walt Disney Studios chairman Alan Horn and president Alan Bergman delivered the news: There would be no future for her 20-year-old label now that Disney's $71.3 billion acquisition of Fox had closed.

Sources tell The Hollywood Reporter she was blindsided and had been assured that Fox 2000 would have a home within the Magic Kingdom. Now, a tug-of-war likely will ensue for Gabler's services, pitting former Fox film co-chiefs Jim Gianopulos and Tom Rothman against each other.

Both Gianopulos, who heads up Paramount Pictures, and Rothman, chairman of Sony's Motion Picture Group, are said to be interested in luring the executive behind such breakouts as The Fault in Our Stars, The Devil Wears Prada and Walk the Line.

Gabler, 63, has not yet decided her next move and enjoys a long professional relationship with both men. Rothman, who attended her recent farewell party on the lot, approached Gabler in spring 2015 to run Sony's TriStar label but was rebuffed.

At least one other major studio and one of the streamers also are expected to throw their hats in the ring given Gabler's track record ushering female-skewing midbudget films (consider that Fault was made for $12 million and earned $307.2 million worldwide).

Though technically Gabler still has a job at Disney, she is not expected to stay given that she lost the ability to greenlight two films per year, as was her setup at Fox. The Kevin Costner dog pic The Art of Racing in the Rain (Sept. 27) and the Amy Adams-led thriller The Woman in the Window (Oct. 4) will mark the final films to be released under the Fox 2000 label before it shutters.

As for why Disney decided to close shop, a studio source says that unlike Oscar magnet Fox Searchlight, there wasn't a clear lane for the Fox 2000 brand (the Fox acquisition nearly doubled the number of film banners Disney manages). It didn't help Gabler's cause that the most recent film from Fox 2000 — the YA police brutality drama The Hate U Give — lost millions after earning just $35 million worldwide.

It is unclear whether Gabler's staff will follow her out the door. One thing is certain: The dozens of projects that make up her development slate will stay behind or be put in turnaround.

Regardless of where she lands, Gabler is one of the most liked execs among authors and screenwriters. Says Michael H. Weber, who adapted John Green's Fault with Scott Neustadter, "Elizabeth loves books and has an innate understanding of what makes them special and how to preserve that feeling when translating them to the big screen."
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Re: Disney+

Postby mr.negativity » Thu Apr 11, 2019 10:21 pm

THR 4/11/2019:
Disney+ Launch Date, Price and Additional Details Revealed
Natalie Jarvey wrote:From the stage inside the Stage 2 on Disney's Burbank campus, executives revealed that Disney+ will launch Nov. 12 and be available for $7 per month or $70 for the whole year.



THR 4/11/2019:
Marvel's Kevin Feige Promises "Major Storylines" for Disney+ Shows
Aaron Couch wrote:The studio boss on Thursday said series such as 'WandaVision' and 'Falcon & Winter Soldier' will have "ramifications that will be felt" throughout the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:38 pm

canofhumdingers wrote:I wonder if e really means what he says when he speaks of the “entire Disney motion picture library”... I’m looking at you Song of the South!

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THR 4/22/2019:
'Song of the South,' 'Dumbo's' Jim Crow Scene Will Not Be on Disney+
Disney plans to open up its vault for Disney+ and release several classic films on the direct-to-consumer streaming service, but one title is staying locked away.

There are no plans to make Song of the South available on the $7-per-month offering.

That is consistent with Disney's previous policy regarding the 1946 film, which has been criticized for its portrayal of African-Americans following the end of the Civil War. The film, which won a best original song Oscar for "Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah" and inspired the Disneyland ride Splash Mountain, has not been released on home video in the U.S.

Disney CEO Bob Iger spoke about the decision during the company's 2011 annual meeting, saying that, after a rewatch of the film, he felt parts of it "wouldn't necessarily sit right or feel right to a number of people today" and that "it wouldn't be in the best interest of our shareholders to bring it back, even though there would be some financial gain." Boardwalk Times first reported the movie's absence.

The company also doesn't plan to include a scene from the 1941 animated film Dumbo featuring a crow named Jim Crow, a reference to a 19th century blackface character that later became the name of the segregation laws enacted following the Reconstruction era. The scene also does not appear in Tim Burton's live-action remake of the original animated pic. Boardwalk Times also first reported the scene's absence.

Disney+, which is designed to be a family-friendly service, is set to launch Nov. 12 with an expansive library of programming, including the Disney classics 101 Dalmatians, Bambi, Fantasia, Mary Poppins, The Sword in the Stone, Steamboat Willie and Sleeping Beauty. In addition to the some 7,500 TV episodes and 500 movies available, the platform will also be home to original programming including The Mandalorian, High School Musical: The Musical: The Series and the live-action remake of Lady and the Tramp.
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby canofhumdingers » Tue Apr 23, 2019 5:56 pm

So I haven’t seen Dumbo since I was a kid and had to go read up on the Jim Crow scene. Now I can remember it (and even remember the tune of the song they sing) and have to wonder; how does the film even work without it? The crows are the ones who teach him to fly!
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Wed Apr 24, 2019 9:21 am

Spoiler Below:
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Screen Rant:
Disney+ Ends The Disney Vault (And Physical Media With It?)
ALEX LEADBEATER wrote:After years of false harbingers, Disney+ could finally signal the end of home media. The new streaming service from the Mouse House is beginning to take shape, with a raft of enviable original content - Star Wars' first live-action TV series, multiple Marvel Studios shows, live-action remakes - and incredibly competitive price-tag. Although it's what we've all seen before that may be the most important.

Over the past ten years, how we watch movies - at home and at the theater - has changed massively. Streaming services like Netflix and its many inheritors and imitators have altered viewing habits, possibly forever, making it easier to watch a massive selection of movies at home over the internet.

This revolution has a two-fold impact. On the one hand, it's given theaters yet another battle with the living room; after TV in the 1950s and home video in the 1980s, streaming has shifted audiences' priorities and what they'll go out and pay to see, leaving behemoth blockbusters ruling and smaller movies struggling (and heading straight to digital as a result). But on the flipside, it's also pinching the now well-established physical media market. The progression of VHS to DVD to Blu-ray has felt like natural progression (give or take a Betamax or Laserdisc), but as 4K becomes close to standard, the unimaginatively 4K Blu-ray doesn't look to have a substantial impact.

Today, as a culture, we buy fewer movies. Instead of purchasing a new DVD or Blu-ray to get a new release at home, we wait for it to stream. And when it comes to catching up on legacy titles, checking whether it's on Netflix/Prime/Hulu (delete as appropriate) is the new normal. And now tech giants have started to pull the plug; Samsung announced it would stop making Blu-ray players earlier this year, suggesting the future is niche and high-end. Yet physical media still clings on. Ease of access and competitive pricing - Amazon Prime means the wait for getting a new title isn't that inconvenient to instant access, and is often cheaper than a rental if not available via subscription - as is the fact that the splintering (or cable-ification) of streaming services means a lot of desirable movies aren't available.

Disney+ begins that change. To understand why, we must first understand how Disney's approached physical media and the Disney Vault.
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby lhb412 » Wed Apr 24, 2019 6:39 pm

canofhumdingers wrote:So I haven’t seen Dumbo since I was a kid and had to go read up on the Jim Crow scene. Now I can remember it (and even remember the tune of the song they sing) and have to wonder; how does the film even work without it? The crows are the ones who teach him to fly!


Why not redub the Crows with non-stereotypical voices? They did so with the 'mammy' character in the Tom and Jerry cartoons I grew up with.
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby canofhumdingers » Wed Apr 24, 2019 7:53 pm

That would be a more palatable choice than excising the scene altogether, but I’d rather just have the film as it was made. I’m a fan of preserving history rather than changing it to suit modern tastes. It frustrates me that people are too dumb to understand that a film (or any artwork) is a time capsule from when it was originally released and may present ideas to which we no longer adhere. It’s something to learn from; not ban, hide away, or forget (unless you WANT to repeat that ugly aspect of history). Perhaps the best option would be to offer viewers the option of the original version or a sanitized version at their own choice.
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby lhb412 » Wed Apr 24, 2019 8:21 pm

^ I think there's a difference though when it comes to streaming media. I think streaming is just a substitute for cable or renting movies, so it makes sense, for instance, to remove the racist bits from Tom and Jerry cartoons because the primary audience is intended not to be adult fans but rather children. I also think unedited versions should be available for purchase for hardcore fans and the like and otherwise be preserved. Unfortunately, major studios don't seem to favor this extensive availability of their properties, which I feel is the actual problem.
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Thu May 02, 2019 8:40 am

THR 5/1/2019:
Alan Bergman, Alan Horn to Share Co-Chairman Title at Disney Studios
Borys Kit wrote:In a move that bolsters its longtime, box office-dominating leadership structure, Walt Disney Studios has promoted Alan Bergman, the studio’s president since 2005, to co-chairman of the company’s entertainment division.

Bergman, who is known for his business acumen and was a key player in the $71.3 billion acquisition of most 21st Century Fox assets, will now work side-by-side with Alan Horn, who has been chairman since 2012, with the two now acting as co-chairmen. Horn, known for his focus on the screenplay process and talent relations, takes on the additional role of chief creative officer.

As co-chairmen, Bergman and Horn will jointly oversee Disney’s film, music and theater groups, as well as the studio's global marketing, distribution, communications and human resources.

Bergman will continue to oversee the studio's business groups including operations, technology, business and legal affairs, labor relations and finance.

"Seven years ago, I had the good fortune of hiring Alan Horn as chairman of our studios, and since then, our studio entertainment group has delivered creative excellence and tremendous box office success," Walt Disney Company chairman and CEO Bob Iger said Wednesday in a statement.

Added Iger, "Alan Bergman’s leadership has also been key to making our studios the gold standard of the industry. The new ‘co-chair’ structure formally recognizes the powerful partnership behind one of the most successful eras in our studios’ history and ensures we remain focused on creating extraordinary entertainment experiences for audiences around the world."

The promotions come as Disney is enjoying the massive $1.2 billion bow of Avengers: Endgame, made by the company's Marvel Studios division. The studio's upcoming release slate includes the tentpoles Aladdin (due out May 24), Toy Story 4 (June 21), The Lion King (July 19), Artemis Fowl (Aug. 9), Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (Oct. 18) and Frozen 2 (Nov. 22), as well as Star Wars: Rise of Skywalker (Dec. 20).

As president, Bergman led Disney’s integration of Marvel when it acquired the comic book entertainment company in 2009, and the earlier integration of Pixar Animation Studios. Horn and Bergman oversaw the assimilation of Star Wars producer Lucasfilm, and the two are now handling the incorporation of Fox’s film labels, such as 20th Century Fox, Fox Family, Fox Searchlight and Blue Sky Studios.

Since the 2012 arrival of Horn, the veteran who previously led the film division at Warner Bros., Disney has enjoyed perhaps the most stable executive stewardships in the film business. Under Horn and Bergman's aegis, the studio became the first and only to cross the $7 billion mark at the global box office in a year, first in 2016, reaching $7.6 billion, and again in 2018 with $7.3 billion, when it also set an industry record of $3.09 billion domestically. A Disney release has led the box office domestically and globally every year since 2015.

Some are comparing the Horn-Bergman combination to the partnership of Terry Semel and Bob Daly, the co-chairmen who made Warner Bros. the dominant studio in the 1990s.

"When I joined the Walt Disney Studios as chairman in 2012, I was fortunate to gain an immensely talented, passionate, and dedicated leadership team, chief among them Alan Bergman, who has been a trusted partner and friend ever since," said Horn.

He continued, "We’ve worked in close consultation throughout my tenure, and the success we’ve had over the past several years would not have been possible without him. As The Walt Disney Studios has grown to encompass not only Disney but Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm, and now the Fox film division, I’m thrilled to acknowledge how Alan’s role has likewise expanded by naming him to lead the studios alongside me as co-chairman."

Added Bergman, "The Walt Disney Studios team is the best in the business, and I’ve been inspired to do my best every day because of the extraordinary group of people I’m fortunate enough to work with. I’m so proud of what we’ve accomplished together, and it’s a great honor to be asked to serve as co-chairman alongside Alan as we look forward to the years ahead."
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Re: Ad Astra

Postby mr.negativity » Wed Jun 05, 2019 6:50 am

Ad Astra | Official Trailer [HD] | 20th Century FOX
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Jul 30, 2019 8:51 am

/film:
Disney Made More Than $7 Billion From Remakes in the Last 9 Years
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby Henry88 » Tue Jul 30, 2019 10:31 pm

is there any scenario where Disney as a company be broken up into smaller pieces?
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Re: Disney News Thread

Postby lhb412 » Wed Jul 31, 2019 8:36 am

^ You need a Roosevelt for that!
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