The J.J. Abrams Thread

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Postby mrbluehair » Tue May 19, 2009 12:23 pm

Oh yeah....a CGI Clyde....now we can make him talk too...how cool would that be??? I mean it's got to be better than having a live Orangutan trained to punch people, drink beer and flip them the bird....

You know that would happen too....SAD!
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J.J. Abrams, Genndy Tartakovsky & Samurai Jack

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Sep 15, 2009 8:06 pm

J.J. Abrams, Genndy Tartakovsky & Samurai Jack

From the Frederator blog: Lunch with Genndy. September 5th, 2009

[quote]
As we zeroed in on how Frederator Films would approach animated feature filmmaking (D’oh! Put the talent first, the same way we did in TV!) I started hanging with the best talent we knew. And, at the head of the list was Genndy Tartakovsky.

That was a pretty easy decision. I was president of Hanna-Barbera when Genndy came to the studio as a key member of Donovan Cook’s 2 Stupid Dogs team. I greenlit his first Dexter’s Laboratory short, and he delivered one of the great cartoons in recent history. Then there was the DL series, also one of the greats. Samurai Jack and Clone Wars were after my time, but I watched Genndy grow as a filmmaker from afar, and I remembered Genndy as one of the best people I’d worked with in my entire career. Talented, smart, dedicated, relentless, amazing leader, moral, and fun. What a rare guy.

I set up the lunch with no expectations. After all, Genndy had just come out of a multi-year relationship with George Lucas, and had set up The Orphanage Animation Studios to develop his own feature films; what could Frederator offer him at this point? But, on the way I realized there was an opportunity. I immediately called Jim Samples, then-President of Cartoon Network, and right away he agreed to a first in the network’s history, granting of rights to an independent production company. They would grant Frederator Studios the animated movie rights to the hit TV series Samurai Jack, as long as we agreed that Genndy would be intimately involved. Agree?!!! How else could we be interested?

Genndy was thrilled when I delivered the news. He’d been disappointed that CN and New Line Cinema had abandoned the project (both animated and live action films) and felt he’d let his fans down. Here was the chance to finish what he’d started, and reclaim a special set of characters he’d created.

Without going into all the details, the deals took forever (forever!) to close (in fact, some of them still have dangling participles) and by the time we announced the formation of Frederator Films in June 2007 surprise was awaiting all of us. J.J. Abrams, a huge Jack fan, had agreed to be my co-producer on the picture (a 2D/stereoscopic 3D production) through his company Bad Robot Productions at Paramount Pictures. We knew that with JJ and his producing partner Bryan Burk we’d be in more than good hands and improve our chances tremendously of actually seeing the movie on the big screens.

After lunch with Genndy, and the success of starting our company with Samurai Jack, our talent approach to animated movies had a prayer. The unanswered question was “what next?â€
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Postby metal_bryan » Tue Sep 15, 2009 9:34 pm

:eek: Holy crap, I totally gave up on ever seeing Samurai Jack again. This is awesome news!
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Postby Dai » Thu Sep 17, 2009 5:47 pm

All these reboots, rehashes and reimaginings, but still no Dinoriders movie :?
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Postby mr.negativity » Tue Dec 15, 2009 1:18 am

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Postby metal_bryan » Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:06 pm

I'm up for a new Jack Ryan film.
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Postby jellydonut25 » Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:04 pm

none of those tidbits of what he MIGHT be working on sounded all that interesting to me...
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500 Rads

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Dec 22, 2009 6:53 am

From /film:
JJ Abrams to Dose Us With 500 Rads


From Movie Viral:
Abrams’ Secret New Project Could Mean More Viral For Us
Alex Gerage wrote:When folks around here think of viral marketing, they think of Cloverfield. After all, MovieViral recognizes the film as one of the primary inspirations for the website. When folks think of Cloverfield, they probably think of its producer J.J. Abrams. It is necessary then to report any and all news regarding his upcoming projects, especially when they are as secretive as what has emerged. Pajiba released some interesting, albeit unconfirmed, rumors about Abrams’ next film, and how it is drawing comparisons to Cloverfield.

Here’s the skinny: Pajima’s top secret source is reporting that Abrams and his Bad Robot production company are planning to set up shop in an undisclosed European location to film a project called 500 Rads. Plot details are nonexistent, but the source goes so far as to compare it to a Cloverfield and 28 Days Later hybrid of sorts. Like Cloverfield, the film will have a modest budget of around $25 million, and it appears a finished script is all that stands in the way of this project getting started.
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Postby mr.negativity » Wed Mar 17, 2010 5:51 am

From Herald.ie:
Lost's JJ Abrams set to film next hit here

Lost creator JJ Abrams will soon be filming in Ireland, the Diary has learned.

The director has commissioned the rights to the hit novel Let The Great World Spin by Irish writer Colum McCann and has named Ireland as one of his locations for the film with a 2012 release date.

With a string of blockbuster hits under his belt, including Mission Impossible 3 and Star Trek, his latest film acquisition is expected to be another box-office success.

Abrams explained: "I'm working now with Colum McCann, one of the greatest writers alive, and I'm honoured to be collaborating with him on an adaptation on Let The Great World Spin, some of which takes place in Ireland -- so I don't know how much better you can get than that," he said.

One of the main characters in the book, Ciaran, hails from Dublin, fuelling speculation that the film adaptation will also choose the capital city as the setting.

But a representative for the Irish Film Board could not confirm any shooting locations or dates, because the film is still "in development".

And Abrams hasn't been shy about his affinity for all things Irish. The film aficionado visited Ireland last year with his family and said that he can't wait to come back again with his wife, Katie, for another holiday.

"We did go and visit Ireland last year and it was just a spectacular trip," he said.
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Postby mr.negativity » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:58 pm

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Postby jellydonut25 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 10:26 pm

Spielberg...ehhhh...He hasn't been on his game in YEARS
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Postby MouthForWar » Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:31 am

What's this thread even about?
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Postby mr.negativity » Sat May 29, 2010 3:09 pm

From Deadline:

MIKE FLEMING wrote:Travis Beacham also completed a script for Bad Robot's JJ Abrams and Bryan Burk to produce. Details are being kept under wraps, but it's based on an Abrams idea and it is on track to begin production later this year.
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Postby mr.negativity » Sat Jan 22, 2011 3:53 pm

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Postby mr.negativity » Mon Feb 14, 2011 5:18 am

From SPINOFF:
New Chapter Coming for "Fringe"
Showrunners Jeff Pinkner and J.H. Wyman brush off lingering concerns about moving "Fringe" to Fridays, promising great things to come and a new chapter starting at the end of Season three. SPINOFF has the details.
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Postby mr.negativity » Tue Apr 19, 2011 7:49 pm

DEADLINE EXCLUSIVE:

NIKKI FINKE wrote:Warner Bros TV just re-upped Monica Breen and Alison Schapker for a 7-figure deal to keep co-executive producing Fringe for Season 4 under Bad Robot's banner. And the pair with long ties to J.J. Abrams (they also worked on his TV dramas Lost and Alias) will develop another TV series for his banner. But it's what they're doing in the movie arena for J.J. and Bad Robot that interests me. At a time when female writing teams are scarce, and even more so in the sci-fi genre, I've learned they've been hired to do a rewrite on one of J.J.'s top-secret projects at Paramount. With a working title of Zanbato, the script involves Japanese history and robotics: "swashbuckling robots with swords" is how one insider describes it to me. (That's the project which Francis Lawrence is no longer attached to direct.) The female writing team will continue to develop original material with J.J. and Bad Robot. Their "heightened reality" crime drama Pulp was written under their deal last year, and now it may turn into a graphic novel or potential comic book series for Warner's DC Comics. Hard to believe that Breen and Schapker were once showrunners for ABC's relationship melodrama Brothers and Sisters.
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Re: J.J. Abrams, Genndy Tartakovsky & Samurai Jack

Postby mr.negativity » Sun Nov 13, 2011 4:12 pm

What 'Immortals' Director Tarsem Singh Really Wants to Do: Direct a 'Samurai Jack' Movie - Singh revealed his secret wish to THR at the film's Hollywood premiere on Monday, Nov. 7.
[quote="Borys Kit "]
Tarsem Singh is the director behind Relativity’s new Greek god epic Immortals and next year's Lily Collins-Julia Roberts Snow White movie, Mirror, Mirror. What will he do next? At the Monday premiere of Immortals, Singh revealed his secret wish: to helm a live-action version of Samurai Jack.

Jack was an edgy and hyperactive animated show created by Genndy Tartakovsky that ran for three seasons on the Cartoon Network starting in 2001. It centered on a warrior from feudal Japan banished into the future by a shape-changing demon, with the warrior battling aliens and robots as he tries to find a way back. The show was known for its varied art styles, the use of split screens and multi-angles, and for long sequences that were dialogue free, all of which contributed to it winning four Emmys.

Singh told The Hollywood Reporter he has little interest in comic book movies but “I love Samurai Jack. I would love to direct that.â€
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Postby mr.negativity » Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:53 pm

From Variety:

Paramount, Bad Robot developing action pic
Brad Parker to direct untitled film, produced by J.J. Abrams, Matt Reeves

Jeff Sneider wrote:Hot off making his feature directorial debut on FilmNation's Oren Peli-produced "The Diary of Lawson Oxford," Brad Parker has been tapped to direct an untitled action movie for Bad Robot and Paramount.

Matt Reeves will produce with Bad Robot principals J.J. Abrams and Bryan Burk. Michael Gilio ("Carter Beats the Devil") wrote the script, though the logline remains under wraps.

Paramount had no comment.

Parker has a close relationship with Reeves, having served as second unit director on Reeves' vampire pic "Let Me In."

An acclaimed commercials helmer who has directed spots for Nike, Nintendo and Sony, Parker began his career in the early 1990s as an animator and art director at MTV, where he co-founded the company's digital animation lab. He joined Digital Domain in 1998 to work on visual effects for "Fight Club" and "XXX."

Gilio recently wrote "Bitterroot," Annapurna Pictures' drama that's expected to mark the feature directorial debut of veteran music video helmer Chris Milk. Gore Verbinski and Jonathan Krauss will produce through the former's Blind Wink banner along with Scott Aversano via his Aversano Films shingle.

Bad Robot recently produced "Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol," which is on its way to a global gross of more than $500 million. Company is about to start production on the Abrams-directed "Star Trek," sequel, which recently enlisted Benedict Cumberbatch ("War Horse") to serve as its villain.

Parker is repped by Paradigm and attorney Darren Trattner, while UTA reps Gilio.
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God Particle

Postby mr.negativity » Fri Nov 30, 2012 4:55 pm

From Vulture 06/11/2012
J.J. Abrams's Bad Robot Orbiting God Particle at Paramount

Claude Brodesser-Akner wrote:We hear that Paramount Pictures has picked up a script called God Particle for J.J. Abrams's Bad Robot to produce from Oren Uziel — the same screenwriter who penned the macabre zombies, vampires, and humans-versus-invading-aliens action-comedy The Kitchen Sink for Sony Pictures.

A rep for the director declined comment, and while details are scant, the logline seems classic Abrams bait: After a physics experiment with a large hadron accelerator causes the Earth to seemingly vanish completely, the terrified crew of an orbiting American space station is left floating in the middle of now-even-more-empty space. When a European spacecraft appears on their radar, the Americans must determine whether it’s their salvation, or a harbinger of doom.

Still, don’t let your heart beat too fast, for based on what else our spies tell us, it seems unlikely that Abrams would direct God Particle. Paramount’s plan is to shoot the whole film for under $5 million; that means it's likely to be released by its newfound Insurge Pictures micro-budget division, which launched in 2010. Of course, Paramount already knew a bit about wringing big profits from anorexic budgets before then: Its Paranormal Activity franchise has grossed $575 million worldwide from three films whose budgets, even when added all together, don’t even crack $9 million. (Naturally, a fourth is on the way.)

Other studios have been quick to embrace the “nothing ventured, everything gained” model: This year's CBS Films Daniel Radcliffe thriller The Woman in Black, for example, was made for $13 million, but cost just $3 million to acquire and $14 million to market and distribute in the U.S. It went on to make $127 million worldwide. Likewise, Fox's Chronicle cost just $22 million to make and has grossed $126 million worldwide.

But the first film released under the Insurge label, this year’s The Devil Inside, was a truly execrable piece of filmmaking whose only impressive achievement is that despite being made for $1 million, it went on to gross $101 million worldwide. (It is the rare film to receive a CinemaScore of F — almost none do — and even rarer for becoming a hit nonetheless.) Hopefully, the involvement of Abrams’s Bad Robot won’t just guarantee God Particle a ridiculous profit margin should it get made, but also ensure some sort of quality control.
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Postby mr.negativity » Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:49 pm

J.J. Abrams Talks STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS, 3D, MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE 5, the FRINGE Finale, Future Projects, Maintaining Secrecy and More
Christina Radish wrote:Have you seen the Fringe finale?

ABRAMS:
I have not seen it. But, the cut has just come in, apparently. I could go watch it right now. Joel [Wyman] is also furiously working on his pilot and splitting his time between that and the new show, which I also can’t wait to talk to you about. But, it will be great. The script was unbelievable. I think it’s going to be incredibly emotional.

Is it satisfying?

ABRAMS:
If it’s not satisfying, I don’t know what satisfying is. Yes, I think it will be satisfying.
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Postby mr.negativity » Fri Aug 16, 2013 10:46 pm

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Re: What is JJ's secret project?

Postby mr.negativity » Sun Jan 26, 2014 8:33 am

JJ Abrams: Hollywood's Renaissance man
Sci-fi visionary JJ Abrams tells Horatia Harrod about publishing his first novel and breathing new life into 'Star Wars’
Horatia Harrod wrote:JJ Abrams is not an easy man to pin down. When you’re the busiest man in Hollywood, it takes the combined efforts of a publicist, a personal assistant and a scheduling assistant to carve out even half-an-hour from your day.

Aside from the novel, the television programmes (he’s producing three that are currently airing in the United States) and the children (he’s co-produced three of those, too, with his wife, Katie McGrath, and likes to be around to take them to school every day), there’s the minor matter of the three sprawling film franchises he’s overseeing, one of which also doubles up as his next directorial duty: Star Wars.

I’ve just broached that daunting subject, down the line to Abrams in Los Angeles, when he arrives at the offices of his production company, Bad Robot. Abrams is a voluble man, as you’d expect from someone who sold his first script when he was still an English student at Sarah Lawrence College, had a multi-picture deal when he was in his early twenties, and whose first feature film, Mission: Impossible III, had a budget of $150million.

Suddenly, though, the line goes quiet. A moment later Abrams laughs incredulously. “Are you kidding me? My god. My office… I’m working on the Star Wars script today and the people in my office have covered up all my windows with black paper. I guess they wanted to make sure no one could see what I was doing.” He seems lost for words, for the first and last time in our conversation. “It seems rather extreme.”

There is something old-fashioned about JJ Abrams. He’s polite and self-deprecating, for one thing, but his interests are also strangely antiquated. “I’m drawn to typewriters and printing and papercraft, and the idea of actual bookbinding and box-making,” he says.

“I do think there’s something about the digital age that is increasingly dehumanising us. We’re in this very weird place where we’re being pulled into experiences that aren’t really experiences at all. When you’re printing something on a Chandler & Price letterpress, even though it might take a long time and it’s imperfect, isn’t that the point?”

Abrams is a classic geek, then, a tinkerer – something that should hearten those who are hoping for a return to the rough, space Western feel of the original Star Wars trilogy.

Born in 1966, he came of age in the era before the internet. “We’re living in a moment of instant information and a sense of entitlement to that information,” he says. “But I think it’s nice to remember that there’s nothing wrong with a sense of anticipation.”

Late last year, Abrams found time to publish a novel. S is not just a book, of course, but a JJ Abrams production, complete with an enigmatic online trailer and teasing back story (as Abrams tells it, the idea for it came to him 15 years ago, when he found an abandoned novel at Los Angeles airport signed by a mysterious Janet).

The book wasn’t actually written by Abrams: that job was given to a writer named Doug Dorst, who batted ideas back and forth with Abrams chapter by chapter. “It was not unlike working on a film,” says Abrams, “where you could be working on your own idea, or a writer’s idea, or a pre-existing storyline – something along the lines of Star Wars, where obviously you are inheriting something that is bigger than all of us.”

In truth, S is an extraordinary creation, a beguiling fake artefact: the main text is a book apparently printed in 1949, the pages lovingly yellowed and foxed. In the margins, a love story plays out in the alternating annotations of two American college students, and there are also editorial interventions in the footnotes that point to a shadowy global plot centred on the author of the novel. Then there are the ephemera: notes on napkins, telegrams, photographs, photocopies, all perfectly reproduced and inserted between the pages.

These are Abrams’s obsessions – with craftsmanship, with puzzles, with esoteric conspiracies – played out in print. S is that rare novel that comes with a code wheel. “For me, the fun of something like S was taking something that we all know very well,” he says, “that incredibly analogue, simple and ubiquitous object, which is the novel, and saying, what would happen if the novel had another dimension to it?”

Maybe it’s because he grew up in Los Angeles, where both parents worked in television, that the line between reality and fiction seems so thin in the Abrams universe. What starts on screen almost always ends up down some real-world rabbit hole; in the darkest recesses of the internet there are probably still people trying to figure out what happened in Lost, the confounding programme that made Abrams famous.

As a child, Abrams loved magic; he has often spoken about a black box he bought as a teenager from Tannens magic shop in Manhattan. He’s had it for more than 30 years, and never opened it. It represents, he says, “infinite possibility”. “Magic is something that’s informed what I’ve done,” he says. “The magic that works, to me, is the magic that feels completely grounded and real and tangible, and movies and television are extensions of that.”

That’s why Abrams doesn’t like to fumble his big reveal. Which takes us back to Star Wars. The film won’t be released for almost two years, yet, as Abrams’s blacked-out windows attest, it’s already the subject of feverish attention. When we spoke, Abrams was discussing the idea of shooting the films in 3D, a technology about which he seems fairly sceptical. "Yeah, I’m not like a 3D fanatic," he says. "I did feel pressure to do it on Star Trek Into Darkness, but it ultimately I understood why it was important to the studio. I was actually really glad in the long run that we did it that way, and I think it worked all right."

Before the release of last year’s Star Trek Into Darkness, Abrams tried to keep secret the identity of the villain played by Benedict Cumberbatch – something he now regrets. “We were trying to preserve the unexpected for the audience, but it came across as if we were trying to be too clever,” he says.

“Star Wars is in every way a different animal. It’s always been a more open, fan-engaged universe than I’ve been used to, so I’m sure there’ll be some sort of compromise. But it feels to me like there’s a purity in not knowing every little thing.”

Sci-fi visionary JJ Abrams :roll:
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Re: God Particle

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Mar 29, 2016 10:28 pm

David Oyelowo and Gugu Mbatha-Raw to Lead J.J. Abrams Sci-Fi Thriller ‘God Particle’
Is this another 'Cloverfield' movie?

mr.negativity wrote:From Vulture 06/11/2012
J.J. Abrams's Bad Robot Orbiting God Particle at Paramount

Claude Brodesser-Akner wrote:We hear that Paramount Pictures has picked up a script called God Particle for J.J. Abrams's Bad Robot to produce from Oren Uziel — the same screenwriter who penned the macabre zombies, vampires, and humans-versus-invading-aliens action-comedy The Kitchen Sink for Sony Pictures.

A rep for the director declined comment, and while details are scant, the logline seems classic Abrams bait: After a physics experiment with a large hadron accelerator causes the Earth to seemingly vanish completely, the terrified crew of an orbiting American space station is left floating in the middle of now-even-more-empty space. When a European spacecraft appears on their radar, the Americans must determine whether it’s their salvation, or a harbinger of doom.

Still, don’t let your heart beat too fast, for based on what else our spies tell us, it seems unlikely that Abrams would direct God Particle. Paramount’s plan is to shoot the whole film for under $5 million; that means it's likely to be released by its newfound Insurge Pictures micro-budget division, which launched in 2010. Of course, Paramount already knew a bit about wringing big profits from anorexic budgets before then: Its Paranormal Activity franchise has grossed $575 million worldwide from three films whose budgets, even when added all together, don’t even crack $9 million. (Naturally, a fourth is on the way.)

Other studios have been quick to embrace the “nothing ventured, everything gained” model: This year's CBS Films Daniel Radcliffe thriller The Woman in Black, for example, was made for $13 million, but cost just $3 million to acquire and $14 million to market and distribute in the U.S. It went on to make $127 million worldwide. Likewise, Fox's Chronicle cost just $22 million to make and has grossed $126 million worldwide.

But the first film released under the Insurge label, this year’s The Devil Inside, was a truly execrable piece of filmmaking whose only impressive achievement is that despite being made for $1 million, it went on to gross $101 million worldwide. (It is the rare film to receive a CinemaScore of F — almost none do — and even rarer for becoming a hit nonetheless.) Hopefully, the involvement of Abrams’s Bad Robot won’t just guarantee God Particle a ridiculous profit margin should it get made, but also ensure some sort of quality control.
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Re: God Particle

Postby mr.negativity » Tue Apr 12, 2016 9:44 pm

John Krasinski in Talks to Join J.J. Abrams' Sci-Fi Thriller 'God Particle'
'The Office' alum will join David Oyelowo and Gugu Mbatha-Raw in the film.
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Re: God Particle

Postby mr.negativity » Thu May 26, 2016 8:02 pm

Ziyi Zhang Joins J.J. Abrams' Sci-Fi Thriller 'God Particle' (Exclusive)
Zhang is part of the international team of astronauts and scientists up in space.


CHRIS O’DOWD JOINS GROWING CAST OF J.J. ABRAMS SCI-FI THRILLER “GOD PARTICLE”
Chris O’Dowd is the latest actor to join the cast of GOD PARTICLE. Paramount’s J.J. Abrams-produced sci-fi thriller will be directed by Julius Onah.
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